NVRN vs CNRN

  1. Hello all,


    I am a new nurse. Last week, my employer scheduled me for a mandatory stroke education. The list was comprised of only 12 nurses. The majority Neuro ICU nurses/ charge nurses. A few were charge nurses and long term RNs from my floor (Neuro Intermediate and/or Step down), I was the only newbie (yay!)


    Anyway, I was informed at the education session that the purpose of it is to prepare all of us for our SCRNs and/ or CNRNs, which ever we choose to do. Suddenly, the NP and the Stroke Coordinator realized that I have only been a nurse for 5 months and told me that I am unable to do either of the certifications, they are correct.
    However, I ordered "Fast Facts for Stroke Care Nursing: An Expert Guide in a Nutshell" by Kathy Morrison. The author mentioned that there are two more certifications related to stroke: NVRN (Neurovascular RN) and CRRN (Certified Rehabiliation RN).

    I am interested in the NVRN-BC by the Association of Neurovascular Clinicians because the requirement is 1,000 clinical hours, as opposed 4,160 hours for the CNRN. I have noticed that the NVRN is not as popular as the CNRN.

    My goals are to enter an ICU and obtain a more in depth knowledge of strokes, as well as other neurological disorders, which is why I'm interested in only the NVRN and CNRN because they cover more than SCRN.

    Do you think taking the NVRN is a good idea, even though it is less popular?

    Thanks in advance!
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   MurseJJ
    NVRN looks interesting, yes it does seem to be less popular than the CNRN and SCRN. I would go for it, as studying for the exam will increase your knowledge base. I may also take this as well (i'm 7 months in on a neurosurgery stepdown). Linkedin turns up a good number of nursing clinicians with this credential, along with the typical CCRN, PCCN, CNRN, and SCRN.

    Good luck!
  4. by   MurseJJ
    Quick update, I bought the review guide from ANVC, got it yesterday. I also bought the SCRN book from AANN to supplement, since it seems like there's content overlap. Hoping to take the exam in December.
  5. by   NeuroNurse101
    Thanks for posting an update! Did you order the book the 8th and receive it the 11th? I wanted to order the guide from ANVC but the fact that they could not guarantee arrival or include a tracking number made me a bit wary. How is the book so far, do you think it is worth it or do you recommend the SCRN book? Are they similar in content? So many questions lol. Whenever you have a chance to answer, I'd greatly appreciate it!
  6. by   MurseJJ
    Quote from NeuroNurse101
    Thanks for posting an update! Did you order the book the 8th and receive it the 11th? I wanted to order the guide from ANVC but the fact that they could not guarantee arrival or include a tracking number made me a bit wary. How is the book so far, do you think it is worth it or do you recommend the SCRN book? Are they similar in content? So many questions lol. Whenever you have a chance to answer, I'd greatly appreciate it!

    I ordered it the 8th and got it the 10th, pretty quick. It's basically in outline format, just like the SCRN book, however I think the SCRN has a little more detail. With both I think having a textbook to go along to read further in depth is helpful (I have the Hickey neuroscience textbook). The ANVC book has some radiologic images, I'm hoping those are just examples and not that the exam will have images on them (I doubt it).
  7. by   NeuroNurse101
    Which book did you purchase: AANN Comprehensive Review for Stroke Nursing or AANN Core Curriculum for Neuroscience Nursing, Sixth Edition? Did you purchase them from the AANN or elsewhere? Would you recommend one of these instead of the ANVC book? My hospital is not going to reimburse me for this certification, so I'm trying to save as much as I can because the books and exam are pricey.
  8. by   MurseJJ
    Quote from NeuroNurse101
    Which book did you purchase: AANN Comprehensive Review for Stroke Nursing or AANN Core Curriculum for Neuroscience Nursing, Sixth Edition? Did you purchase them from the AANN or elsewhere? Would you recommend one of these instead of the ANVC book? My hospital is not going to reimburse me for this certification, so I'm trying to save as much as I can because the books and exam are pricey.
    The Stroke Nursing book. I bought it from the AANN website (I believe members get a discount, I can't remember). It makes sense to get the ANVC book since that's the exam you plan on taking, so you should get the review book from the organization that's making the exam. The Stroke Nursing book seems to cover similar content, and provides a little more detail (both are in outline format), so I figured I could use both to review, and supplement certain topics with my neuro textbook (the Hickey textbook, you can search on Amazon, that's where I got that one).

    Hope that helps!
  9. by   Uniden
    Quote from NeuroNurse101
    Anyway, I was informed at the education session that the purpose of it is to prepare all of us for our SCRNs and/ or CNRNs, which ever we choose to do. Suddenly, the NP and the Stroke Coordinator realized that I have only been a nurse for 5 months and told me that I am unable to do either of the certifications, they are correct.
    I don't understand why you say there are correct. I think you should be eligible for the SCRN exam. Unless your hospital will not reimburse you for it. Like you, I am a new Neuro nurse progressive care unit in a level 1 hospital, and I am trying to get certified.


    I called the American Board of Neuroscience nursing who are over the exam and they say that it's suggested a candidate has 2 years experience but it is not required.


    Now the CNRN has a ridiculous hour requirement of 4160hr (so 2 years). The SCRN says it is suggested for a nurse of 2 years but doesn't explicitly say it has to be 2 years. THE NVRN has a 1000 hr requirement, which would be around 7 months as an RN.


    Best of luck!
  10. by   MurseJJ
    Quote from Uniden
    I don't understand why you say there are correct. I think you should be eligible for the SCRN exam. Unless your hospital will not reimburse you for it. Like you, I am a new Neuro nurse progressive care unit in a level 1 hospital, and I am trying to get certified.


    I called the American Board of Neuroscience nursing who are over the exam and they say that it's suggested a candidate has 2 years experience but it is not required.


    Now the CNRN has a ridiculous hour requirement of 4160hr (so 2 years). The SCRN says it is suggested for a nurse of 2 years but doesn't explicitly say it has to be 2 years. THE NVRN has a 1000 hr requirement, which would be around 7 months as an RN.


    Best of luck!
    Thanks for the info, and yeah, just looked at the website (I had just assumed SCRN would be the same as CNRN), and the CNRN says "must" have the 2 years, while SCRN doesn't have that language (just saying that the test is designed for those with 2 years and may not be appropriate for someone just entering the specialty).

    Thanks again!

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