A few Neuro Q's....

  1. 0 Can you guys tell I have a Neuro test coming up that is either going to make or break me???

    1) If you are assesing a comatose Pt, who is a 1 on the Glasgow chart for Eye response, do you open the lid and check the pupil response or not? If yes, is this how u would chart it....Glasgow Eye 1, pupils Pearl...or...if they don't react...Glasgow eye 1, pupils not PERLA? Or maybe u don't even open the eye?

    2) How do u chart that u did a Glasgow? Do u write out each test, i.e., Eye 2, Speech 2, Motor 2. Hmmm.

    3) What Pt's absolutely can't have a spinal tap?

    4) If someone comes into the ER with a suspected neck and/or spinal cord injury, and they have a brace on, the HOB is to be up 30 degrees, right? The only time they are to be flat is if they aren't stabilized, but if they are, the HOB should be up, for both types of injuries?
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  3. Visit  raindrop profile page

    About raindrop

    From 'Scranton, PA'; 37 Years Old; Joined Dec '04; Posts: 493; Likes: 178.

    14 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  NurseyBaby'05 profile page
    0
    Quote from raindrop
    Can you guys tell I have a Neuro test coming up that is either going to make or break me???

    1) If you are assesing a comatose Pt, who is a 1 on the Glasgow chart for Eye response, do you open the lid and check the pupil response or not? If yes, is this how u would chart it....Glasgow Eye 1, pupils Pearl...or...if they don't react...Glasgow eye 1, pupils not PERLA? Or maybe u don't even open the eye?

    2) How do u chart that u did a Glasgow? Do u write out each test, i.e., Eye 2, Speech 2, Motor 2. Hmmm.

    3) What Pt's absolutely can't have a spinal tap?

    4) If someone comes into the ER with a suspected neck and/or spinal cord injury, and they have a brace on, the HOB is to be up 30 degrees, right? The only time they are to be flat is if they aren't stabilized, but if they are, the HOB should be up, for both types of injuries?
    Hey Rain-

    We just got done with ours, so let me see if I retained anything.

    1-chart left and right eye instead of one and two. Indicate pupil size and perrla + or - and note specifics. Definitely open they eye.

    2-Not sure what instructor is after on Glasgow. Usually there is a form broken into categories where you can score each individually. I would get clarification from the instructor or fellow classmates on that one.

    3-Any pt. who is at risk for increased ICP. In particular, intercrainial bleeders.

    4-Right on about HOB being up 30 degrees. Also, keep posture aligned and head in neutral position. Don't have arms and legs flexed too far. All of these things increase ICP.

    So, how did I do?:chuckle
  5. Visit  raindrop profile page
    0
    Quote from NurseyBaby'05
    Hey Rain-

    We just got done with ours, so let me see if I retained anything.

    1-chart left and right eye instead of one and two. Indicate pupil size and perrla + or - and note specifics. Definitely open they eye.

    2-Not sure what instructor is after on Glasgow. Usually there is a form broken into categories where you can score each individually. I would get clarification from the instructor or fellow classmates on that one.

    3-Any pt. who is at risk for increased ICP. In particular, intercrainial bleeders.

    4-Right on about HOB being up 30 degrees. Also, keep posture aligned and head in neutral position. Don't have arms and legs flexed too far. All of these things increase ICP.

    So, how did I do?:chuckle
    It makes sense!

    Now, about the spinal tap being restricted with anyone who has ICP, that would incude anyone who has had a stroke, been in a MVA, etc, etc? It seems (to me) that if one is at risk for getting IICP, you would WANT to get rid of some by a ST, otherwise it will just keep building up. That's what I don't get.
  6. Visit  NurseyBaby'05 profile page
    0
    Yes! You're absolutely correct about wanting to rid the pt. of excess fluid in skull. Now,to monitor ICP, drain fluid if need be, collect a CSF sample and administer meds (be sure they're preservative free) they do a vertriculostomy. It is a form of invasive monitoring that also has a closed CSF drainage system attached. As far as CVA patients go, they are not usually at risk for increased ICP. I'm still digging for the "why" for not doing the lunbar puncture for a patient, but I figured I'd put this up for now.
    Last edit by NurseyBaby'05 on Mar 21, '05
  7. Visit  NurseyBaby'05 profile page
    0
    Now don't quote me on this, but see if this makes sense to you. I think where they are going with nixing the lumbar puncture on these patients has to do with the pressure within the spinal column. I couldn't find in my notes where she said to never do a lumbar puncture on pts with increased ICP, but here's what a I found in my critical care book:

    Reduction of ICP by CSF drainage: Accomplished only by using intraventricular or ventriculostomy systems. To prevent herniation when draining CSF, drainage collection bags must be maintained at the level of the tragus of the ear or higher, thereby preventing excessive CSF flow caused by higher-to-lower pressure gradient.

    I'm pretty sure she mentioned herniation in her lecture when she was on her soapbox about not doing the lumbar puncture. It makes sense to me.

    Now, wouldn't the same principal apply with the lumbar puncture? It's well below the ventricle of the brain and if there's a lot of pressure (intracranial bleed for example) on the brain tissue above the ventricle, it could force the cerebral tissue into the space against the mid brain (aka CNS control center)as a result from a vacuumlike suction from the pressure being released from below. This would result in a herniation (central, I want to say).

    Sorry, if this wasn't too organized. I was trying to think "aloud" on paper. I definitely think this is where they are going with regard to not wanting to do a lumbar puncture on these patients.

    When is your test? I'm actually shadowing on a Neuro floor tomorrow and I definitely want to ask this. I'll have a for sure answer tomorrow. Good luck on your test too!
  8. Visit  Elenaster profile page
    0
    Quote from NurseyBaby'05
    Now, wouldn't the same principal apply with the lumbar puncture? It's well below the ventricle of the brain and if there's a lot of pressure (intracranial bleed for example) on the brain tissue above the ventricle, it could force the cerebral tissue into the space against the mid brain (aka CNS control center)as a result from a vacuumlike suction from the pressure being released from below. This would result in a herniation (central, I want to say).
    Good thinking NurseyBaby - that's why we make sure the EVD is leveled properly every hour and with any movement of the patient. Also you wouldn't want to LP a patient with a suspected or confirmed spinal cord injury because it's very important to maintain alignment until the spine has been surgically fixated.

    To answer your question about charting Glasgow, you do it like this:

    GCS=15 (E=4, V=5, M=6) or whatever your assessment reveals.
  9. Visit  NurseyBaby'05 profile page
    0
    Awesome! Thank you! I was fortuante to get clarification when I shadowed today on a Neuro unit. BTW, I loved it!
  10. Visit  candyndel profile page
    0
    The Coma scale is a crude measurement and is only one small part of the neuro assessment. It is very important to assess pupillary response to light (are u really checking accomodation on all your pts... i know not this comatose one...if not, dont write PERLA), so yes open the lids and show them the light!!
    EVM... yes yes yes!!

    No to your longboard question. You can raise the HOB 30 only once they are off the longboard. If they are on a longboard, c collar and CID (as with suspected spinal injury) they have to stay flat (the longboard in about 6 ft long). but if u suspect increased ICP and want the HOB up, you will have to put them in reverse Trendelenberg (sp?) until the longboard is cleared. You should only worry about infants lying flat on a board...


    Quote from raindrop
    Can you guys tell I have a Neuro test coming up that is either going to make or break me???

    1) If you are assesing a comatose Pt, who is a 1 on the Glasgow chart for Eye response, do you open the lid and check the pupil response or not? If yes, is this how u would chart it....Glasgow Eye 1, pupils Pearl...or...if they don't react...Glasgow eye 1, pupils not PERLA? Or maybe u don't even open the eye?

    2) How do u chart that u did a Glasgow? Do u write out each test, i.e., Eye 2, Speech 2, Motor 2. Hmmm.

    3) What Pt's absolutely can't have a spinal tap?

    4) If someone comes into the ER with a suspected neck and/or spinal cord injury, and they have a brace on, the HOB is to be up 30 degrees, right? The only time they are to be flat is if they aren't stabilized, but if they are, the HOB should be up, for both types of injuries?
  11. Visit  raindrop profile page
    0
    Thanks a million you guys! Your responses were clear and simple - just what I needed.

    My test is ttttttttt-tomorrow. I'm sooooo scared.

    The Neuro test tomorrow is the first half. It is going to cover Meningitis, IICP, Cerebral edema, migraines, seizures and possible a few A&P Q's. My instructors tend to hit "initial" signs& symtoms of a disease, "late" s/s of a disease, nursing measures for these people, and of course, pharmacology. Yea me. I'm so scared b/c we only have 2 test left after this one, and being that I'm not doing so well in school right now (thanks to the Renal test), this test could either REALLY drop me, or REALLY bring me up. Stressful!

    I'll keep ya's posted.
  12. Visit  NurseyBaby'05 profile page
    0
    I'm so glad we were able to help. I definitely know how you feel though. Our renal is on the final and the instructor is the one who did the cardiac test that the class did abyssmally as a whole. (Me included.) A lot of her "best" answers seem to be her own personal preferences as a nurse rather than because of patho, nursing process, etc. **Sigh!:angryfire ** Oh, well! I'll suck it up and be ready to move on to my mentorship.

    Some important A&P to go over is which part of the brain controls a particular human behavior or function. Left lobe vs. rt. lobe and how would you tread these patients. A lot of this affects how you care for these patients. For example, a patient with right brain damage is more likely to have problems with impulse control and spatial-perceptual defecits. Safety would be a huge issue with these patients with regard to care. Also, this may not occur to us b/c were able to function, but these people often need to be reminded where their feet are. (Like, "No! don't stand yet! Your feet haven't reached the floor!") Please let us knwo how you did!

    :flowersfo Sending good test wishes!
  13. Visit  raindrop profile page
    0
    Took it, passed it (84%). Am I happy with that score? Yes, considering that test was BS. Class average was 80%.

    It was HORRIBLE. I estimate that half of the Q's weren't from lecture. One of the students asked her, after the test, where some of these Q's came from. She stated "if it's in the book, it's fair game." I see her side, but come one. Our reading assignments were HUGE, and in SEVERAL different books - pharm, MS, Peds. Nobody has time to read through all that info, and retain it.

    Oh well, it's over with and I passed. I was hoping for an A, but I will take what I can get.

    You know what they say....C's get degrees ;-)
  14. Visit  NurseyBaby'05 profile page
    0
    Sorry your test was so bad! At least you know how she gets her questionsfor the next test. Passing is good! The other important thing is learning. A lot of people can spit things back to an instructor after cramming for days straight, but it's really hard to retain info when you study that way. It sounds like you are least at a solid C, which is good. There are a lot of people going into our final tomorrow hanging on by the skin of their teeth with the lowest C possible. talk about your heart being in your throat. I'm okay this semester, I have a B and that's just fine with me. Only a few more weeks to go! You too!!!!!
    :icon_hug:
  15. Visit  nurse lucky profile page
    0
    Quote from raindrop
    Can you guys tell I have a Neuro test coming up that is either going to make or break me???

    1) If you are assesing a comatose Pt, who is a 1 on the Glasgow chart for Eye response, do you open the lid and check the pupil response or not? If yes, is this how u would chart it....Glasgow Eye 1, pupils Pearl...or...if they don't react...Glasgow eye 1, pupils not PERLA? Or maybe u don't even open the eye?

    2) How do u chart that u did a Glasgow? Do u write out each test, i.e., Eye 2, Speech 2, Motor 2. Hmmm.

    3) What Pt's absolutely can't have a spinal tap?

    4) If someone comes into the ER with a suspected neck and/or spinal cord injury, and they have a brace on, the HOB is to be up 30 degrees, right? The only time they are to be flat is if they aren't stabilized, but if they are, the HOB should be up, for both types of injuries?
    People who are on anticoags can't have spinal taps as they may develop a hematoma which could cause paralysis!

    No one does well on a neuro test in school, because they texts are outdated as the theorys and care change rapidly. I would probably fail the test as we do things differently than that taught in the book. Thank god it's over! Don't feel bad. You're all done with it and on to the rest!!!


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