Floor nursing vs ICU nursing - page 4

Do you think ICU nursing is as STRESSFUL (crazy, hectic, etc) as med/surg floor nursing? I realize ICU nursing takes a great deal of knowledge and the patients are more critical, . . . .I need an... Read More

  1. by   dfk
    Quote from geekgolightly
    ?? but why does that have you enjoying ICU? i really dont get it.

    i happen to be ACLS, but that's only because i am interested. it certainly doesn't make me a better nurse on the floor. they "freeze" because really, they know better than to pretend to know how to do something, but they do know how to keep track of seven patients and everything going on with them. its a very very very difficult dance, and most critical care nurses would fall flat on their faces. i dont think knowing ICU nurses would utterly fail at being a floor nurse is what makes floor nurses enjoy being floor nurses.
    i guess i'm being unclear.. i enjoy ICU.. much better than med/surg - i've done it.. i've taken care of six of my own pt's, monitored 16 on a wing, kept track of 2 lpn's and did all IV meds on 16 pts.. so i hear what your saying.. i went to icu for several reasons, one being i didn't want or like to do med/surg any longer than i had to (which is probably why MANY nurses go to ICU), and two, to get into anesthesia school.. it is what you make of it -
    and i can't completely agree that icu nurses can't handle floor.. it's been done and will continue.. but by choice, they don't usually want to..
    sort of like "going backwards" in time.. but throw a floor nurse into an icu, they're more likely to "fall flat" as you so eloquently put it..
  2. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from dfk
    i guess i'm being unclear.. i enjoy ICU.. much better than med/surg - i've done it.. i've taken care of six of my own pt's, monitored 16 on a wing, kept track of 2 lpn's and did all IV meds on 16 pts.. so i hear what your saying.. i went to icu for several reasons, one being i didn't want or like to do med/surg any longer than i had to (which is probably why MANY nurses go to ICU), and two, to get into anesthesia school.. it is what you make of it -
    and i can't completely agree that icu nurses can't handle floor.. it's been done and will continue.. but by choice, they don't usually want to..
    sort of like "going backwards" in time.. but throw a floor nurse into an icu, they're more likely to "fall flat" as you so eloquently put it..
    I agree, most Med/Surg RNs would have trouble floating to an ICU & taking care of Mech Vent patients on multi cardiac drip infusions.
  3. by   geekgolightly
    Quote from Corvette Guy
    I agree, most Med/Surg RNs would have trouble floating to an ICU & taking care of Mech Vent patients on multi cardiac drip infusions.
    I've done it and didn't fall flat on my face and I have read post after post here from ICU nurses who ended up after one shift on the floor a walking wreck who couldn;t keep up.
  4. by   geekgolightly
    Quote from dfk
    i guess i'm being unclear.. i enjoy ICU.. much better than med/surg - i've done it.. i've taken care of six of my own pt's, monitored 16 on a wing, kept track of 2 lpn's and did all IV meds on 16 pts.. so i hear what your saying.. i went to icu for several reasons, one being i didn't want or like to do med/surg any longer than i had to (which is probably why MANY nurses go to ICU), and two, to get into anesthesia school.. it is what you make of it -
    and i can't completely agree that icu nurses can't handle floor.. it's been done and will continue.. but by choice, they don't usually want to..
    sort of like "going backwards" in time.. but throw a floor nurse into an icu, they're more likely to "fall flat" as you so eloquently put it..
    what youre describing i do now exactly that, but with no transportation team. and like i responded to corvetteguy, i have taken care of an ICU pt (and one tele) who was multiple drips and stable vent. made no adjustments to the vent, but did monitor with abg's. its not rocket science and frankly speaking, its easier for me to care for two than who knows how many on floor. with two, i can KNOW them and keeping everything straight is much easier.

    im not saying that it would be easier for everyone, my brain is just set up like that. "going backwards" tacks on a caste system to nursing, which i dont get and never will. prestige is pretty important to some people i guess.
  5. by   JazzyRN
    Quote from geekgolightly
    what youre describing i do now exactly that, but with no transportation team. and like i responded to corvetteguy, i have taken care of an ICU pt (and one tele) who was multiple drips and stable vent. made no adjustments to the vent, but did monitor with abg's. its not rocket science and frankly speaking, its easier for me to care for two than who knows how many on floor. with two, i can KNOW them and keeping everything straight is much easier.

    im not saying that it would be easier for everyone, my brain is just set up like that. "going backwards" tacks on a caste system to nursing, which i dont get and never will. prestige is pretty important to some people i guess.
    I think taking care of a couple stable ICU pts once in awhile is not going to give you an accurate idea of what an ICU nurse goes through. It may have been easier for you to take care those two on that day, than a floor of pts. However its important to keep in mind that things are not always running smoothly in the ICU and things can go disastrously wrong quickly, and with 2 pts or even 1, you can be running nonstop with no lunch from 7am to 7pm to keep them alive.
  6. by   dfk
    Quote from Corvette Guy
    All men who are nurses are male nurses, LOL! I fail to understand why some male nurses refuse to be proud of the title of Male RN?
    sorry corvette guy,
    rn is just that. no sex label or whatever. and sorry again, but i get perturbed when addressed as a male nurse. i am proud of being a nurse, but don't need the pretext.
  7. by   dfk
    Quote from geekgolightly
    what youre describing i do now exactly that, but with no transportation team. and like i responded to corvetteguy, i have taken care of an ICU pt (and one tele) who was multiple drips and stable vent. made no adjustments to the vent, but did monitor with abg's. its not rocket science and frankly speaking, its easier for me to care for two than who knows how many on floor. with two, i can KNOW them and keeping everything straight is much easier.

    im not saying that it would be easier for everyone, my brain is just set up like that. "going backwards" tacks on a caste system to nursing, which i dont get and never will. prestige is pretty important to some people i guess.
    alright... i'm not arguing here. merely stating what my experiences have been. you perhaps are not the majority, so embrace that. i think we've beaten this to death. so long...
  8. by   Corvette Guy
    Quote from dfk
    sorry corvette guy,
    rn is just that. no sex label or whatever. and sorry again, but i get perturbed when addressed as a male nurse. i am proud of being a nurse, but don't need the pretext.
    dfk - No problem at all, nor apologies needed. We could spend hours upon hours discussing such a topic. I think, your line of thought is a nurse is a nurse, no matter the gender, which I can appreciate. My line of thought is the title of Male RN takes some of the feminine [constituting the gender that includes most words referring to females] connotation out of the word nurse. In fact, some folks [some males, but not all] have expressed an interest in finding a replacement name for the word nurse, which I think is silly. We could continue this discussion via email if you like.

    Back to the topic [since it is my fault we went off topic]- IMHO, most nurses that work in Med/Surg do so by choice & most nurses that work in ICU/CCU/MICU/etc. do so by choice, as well. Never should one's area of nursing be considered more significant than another. ALL phases of nursing care are extremely important in a patient's path to recovery.
  9. by   dfk
    Quote from Corvette Guy
    dfk - No problem at all, nor apologies needed. We could spend hours upon hours discussing such a topic. I think, your line of thought is a nurse is a nurse, no matter the gender, which I can appreciate. My line of thought is the title of Male RN takes some of the feminine [constituting the gender that includes most words referring to females] connotation out of the word nurse. In fact, some folks [some males, but not all] have expressed an interest in finding a replacement name for the word nurse, which I think is silly. We could continue this discussion via email if you like.
    yea, the best one i've heard is murse.. come to think of it, i believe it's the only one i know. but i do agree, the term nurse is definitely connotated as being "feminine".. even the spanish word for nurse is enfermera.. if you know your masculine and feminine endings, notice the "a" ... yep, feminine once again
    face it, it is what it is and we are what we are...

    me: "hi, my name is bif. i'll be your nurse tonight."
    old lady: "oh, how nice. a male nurse!"
    me: :angryfire :angryfire "yes. that's me. call me if you need anything. "
  10. by   eiznekrs
    i agree that most nurses are in their respective units by their own choice. i am a newly grad and i decided to be in ICU because i think i can take care of two high acuity patients better than six less acute ones. how on earth can someone juggle an average of six patients per shift? unbelievable!!!

    i have a tunnel vision. i can only concentrate on a few things... so i can only handle two patients at a time.

    also, i want to attend a CRNA program. it's best then that i start my ICU experience right off graduation.

    lastly, the ratio of men to women RN's in my hospial is 1:10. but in my ICU i would say it's probably 4:10 or bigger. i don't really know why. i don't even know if this is a trend.
  11. by   smile123
    Quote from eiznekrs

    also, i want to attend a CRNA program. it's best then that i start my ICU experience right off graduation.

    lastly, the ratio of men to women RN's in my hospial is 1:10. but in my ICU i would say it's probably 4:10 or bigger. i don't really know why. i don't even know if this is a trend.
    Here's my observation: Most CRNA programs require 2 years of ICU experience. More men attracted to the CRNA program (they can make more money) so they choose the ICU right after graduation for that reason. This is a general observation.

    BTW, you may want to look into the IMC (Intermediate Care). They take care of 2 or 3 patients max; those patients are not nearly as acute as ICU patients. They generally need a little more care before they are transferred to the general floor. They are usually awake and not intubated, so you can talk to them and they can respond. I didn't want to take care of 7 or 8 patients on the general floor but I didn't feel like working with ICU patients who were critically ill. So the IMC made a lot of sense for me.
  12. by   dfk
    Quote from smile123
    Here's my observation: Most CRNA programs require 2 years of ICU experience. More men attracted to the CRNA program (they can make more money) so they choose the ICU right after graduation for that reason. This is a general observation.
    ummm, don't think that's accurate.
    first, more men go into critical care, such as ICU and ER, as a general observation, CRNA or not.
    second, if you look at the statistics, there are way more women than men in, and going into, CRNA programs.
    and third, yea, more money, for anyone who enters that field, but it is NOT the major motivating factor for entry. there can be more money made in the same field, and others as well.
    it would be great if people would do a little researching before sounding off about something they are obviously not too aware of.
  13. by   smile123
    Quote from dfk
    ummm, don't think that's accurate.
    first, more men go into critical care, such as ICU and ER, as a general observation, CRNA or not.
    second, if you look at the statistics, there are way more women than men in, and going into, CRNA programs.
    and third, yea, more money, for anyone who enters that field, but it is NOT the major motivating factor for entry. there can be more money made in the same field, and others as well.
    it would be great if people would do a little researching before sounding off about something they are obviously not too aware of.
    I was talking about my observations, not statistics. Most people go into nursing because they want to provide care. However, it is a known fact that CRNAs do make good money. Yes, there are more women in general who go into nursing no matter what specialty because that's the makeup of the students right now. I was just talking about how among the male nurses/nursing students I know, there seem to be more men who are gravitating to the ICU/CRNA path now rather than going into general floor nursing. It was my observation, which I stated at the begnning of my post. So please don't start attacking posters; it is not good etiquette. Thanks.

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