Latest Comments by oinch97

oinch97 2,210 Views

Joined Sep 10, '08. Posts: 24 (25% Liked) Likes: 21

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    Wow, I wish we could use Posey beds where I work now. Our facility only uses them in psych areas

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    nursel56, Altra, JustBeachyNurse, and 7 others like this.

    Were you called by the ARC to assist with the disaster? I understand due to your previous work as a firefighter, you felt the need to help out, and I do commend you for your willingness to help, but I have to agree with the other posters here. Not knowing the attendance policy of your facility, or your personal attendance history, I couldn't really make a judgement whether you should have actually been written up or not. I am sure you are not being disciplined FOR helping with the disaster, but for laying aside one responsibility (your job) for another (your skills and personal desire to help in a time of need).

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    Last I heard MSHA (the company operating Johnson City Med Center) starts new grads at $18/hr. This is low compared to some other areas, but the cost of living is very fair here. I'm not sure what the other systems in the area pay though.

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    Never heard of it...can you elaborate a bit on what's involved?

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    As far as actually improving your credit (which is what I have started to work on), you can try getting a "secured" credit card, where you pay a deposit which would then relate to your credit limit for the card. Only use it once every 1-2 months for something minor like gas or something else maybe $40 or less, and pay it off as soon as you get each bill. Keep an eye on your credit report and slowly you will notice things beginning to improve.
    As for the old debts.... follow your conscience as you consider making payment on them. If you do pay, make sure you have documentation of payment, especially if you have paid in full or take a "settlement" offer. Ask them to provide something in writing that the debt is paid in full. Oh, and some collection agencies can be, shall we say less than honest, so never provide them with bank account info or anything that could give them access to your paycheck. Be sure of what the laws are in your state as far as debt collection and the statute of limitations for the type of debt you have.
    It can be a really rough road, but regaining your financial integrity can be nearly priceless.

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    CarribeanDreamin' likes this.

    I use the organizing utility tote from Thirty-One. It's got pockets all around the outside, and the pockets on each end have elastic and can hold a water or drink bottle. It was only about $25 and comes in lots of cute patterns. They have embroidery too but it costs a little extra.

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    Depends mostly on how quickly you get your paperwork turned in, and how quickly the school will send your transcripts to the BON. Our school took about a month, but I guess it can vary.

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    Mentoria is pretty good. I took her NCLEX course, and she gave us lots of materials to study on our own time. I don't know how expensive she is on an individual basis, but I think we paid like $200 each for the NCLEX session.

  • 0

    Quote from K+MgSO4
    the pillow case facing away from the door is a VERY old thing. It was to prevent sand and dust getting into the pillow when wards had verandas that were opened during the day to let fresh air in. I still do it and do proper bed making when the pt is out of the bed. If they are in it they get their top bed sheet pulled out and doubled over the end.
    Really? I remember our instructors telling us that the pillow case thing came from an old superstition/old wives tale, something about evil spirits getting in, etc.... But back to original topic, I don't get the chance to do it that often on nights, but when I was a tech, we always made our beds the "old school" way.

  • 1
    yousoldtheworld likes this.

    I have flat feet and chronic back/leg pain. On someone's recommendation I bought a pair of Alegria shoes and omg I could not believe the difference they made! Kinda clunky looking but they have made a world of difference for me!

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    I was a phlebotomist for 5 years before nursing school, and never missed an IV in clinicals (even on a patient some of the staff nurses were afraid to stick ) But for a while after I came out of orientation I became skittish, mostly either because I had a renal patient with a crappy selection of veins to begin with, or just because my group of patients was omgsofreakinbusy enough without having to go start an IV. But, we have some excellent charge nurses who broke me from that soon enough, and as I became more comfortable with my patient loads, prioritizing, etc., I began making myself at least give them a shot. Now, I even offer to try some of the other hard IV sticks on the floor and have become somewhat of a "go-to" person myself lol. Unfortunately I do also know some of the nurses take advantage of someone who is willing to help, and it sucks, but it is a reality.

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    Davey Do likes this.

    The Doctor starring William Hurt was one that our nursing instructors recommended us to watch. Also if you're into ethical dilemmas, there's also Cider House Rules.

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    I too would tend to agree that you should give it some time. I started as a "nurse intern" on a floor working days, then due to some staffing needs, was moved to nights. At first I thought I would never adjust, and my family truly worried about me because of some past mental health issues I'd had. But, I had no choice...I had bills to pay, needed health insurance, etc. I eventually adjusted, and now even as an RN I prefer to work nights, to the extent that even if I work a day shift, I get physically sick lol. I would follow all the great tips posted above. I myself have a "sound machine" and if I need a little time to wind down before going to sleep, I watch tv for a bit. I have "black-out" curtains in my bedroom (JC Penney has some on clearance on their outlet web site, by the way), and the sound machine is pretty good at drowning out all the little noises that come from having very close neighbors who seem to be very adamant about their yard work, even in winter.
    If, after a few more months, you just cannot bear to work night shift, talk to your manager again. Sometimes it's just one more thing on that list of things we don't love, but we have to do.

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    Quote from Meowmixer
    Nicotine isn't a controlled substance, nor do they test for it in a drug screening.
    Just an FYI you can test for nearly anything, drugs or otherwise in the right lab... Our hospital has begun testing for nicotine also, due to the fact that employees sign statements saying they are non-smokers for the lower insurance premiums.


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