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edmia 10,468 Views

Joined Aug 19, '07. Posts: 850 (59% Liked) Likes: 1,696

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  • Nov 16

    Quote from charming_kitty
    personally i would never get my degree online. I've taken online classes before and with online classes, you lack the intensity, and discipline, and monitoring. it's a lot easier for people to get away with things. I've avoided getting an online degree because I fear employers would not approve. That being said, would you want your doctor to get an online degree? same thing with nurses. I would never go to a NP with an online degree. A person with an online NP degree has prescription power just like MD!
    Get away with what? Most online programs have proctored examinations. And you can get your friend to write your papers for you at a brick and mortar school just as easily as an online school. That is an uneducated opinion. I don't judge my medical provider based on what university they graduate from. I judge them on interpersonal skills and knowledge that I asses when I meet them in action.


    Sent from my iPhone -- blame all errors on spellcheck

  • Sep 25

    Why do people think $220 k is too much for an NP? I'm honestly curious about this. Why do NPs feel unworthy? For the responsibility and work involved, I find the $200,000+ range completely reasonable.


    Sent from my iPhone -- blame all errors on spellcheck

  • Sep 1

    Quote from MedChica
    Is this a troll thread or something?

    I have an armpit length kinky/curly fro. I rec'v compliments from everyone.
    Even I didn't - I doubledog dare anyone to look me in my eyeballs and call it 'unprofessional' -- suggesting that I "do something about it".

    No. Braids, dreds, sisterlocks, fro's, etc... are not fads. They're black hair styles. It's deeply cultural.
    As for my curls -- this is how my hair naturally grows from my frickin' scalp. Hell, yeah - it's BIG! LOL I don't need to 'do something' about it. OUR hair doesn't need to be 'fixed'.
    I'm not going to alter the very structure of my hair shaft to fit some idiot interviewer's WARPED beauty ideal.
    Should I change my skin color,too? Maybe, get the fat sucked out of my lips...or butt ( could be lucrative considering all of these 'boxy'-looking pancake *expletive* females getting butt augmentation these days). LOL
    I've enough to spare!
    Absolutely! It's not about this one job interview. This is about the bigger issue of discrimination based on a person's biological appearance. No one should change their natural appearance to get a job. That is the only way to change things. Be actively true to yourself. I have crazy curls and I would never straighten my hair for an interview. I'll be clean. Professionally dressed, and wear my curls as I would on the floor (ponytail). But that's it. Activism by virtue of not changing to meet some judgemental person's idea of "proper" (ie, white with straight hair).


    Sent from my iPhone -- blame all errors on spellcheck

  • Aug 18

    Quote from pre-pre-nurseshan
    Whoa - this thread really took off while I wasn't looking!

    A couple of things:

    1) I am a Christian.

    2) Because I have a belief in a deity, I began to wonder how atheist nurses interpret the dictum that, among a patient's many needs, there are spiritual needs to be met.

    3) Only a few people actually answered the question that I asked, which was probably unclear because I was trying too hard to be respectful. Put a different way, that question is: do atheist nurses believe that humans have a spiritual as well as physical and mental component? If not, do you take the requirement to care for spiritual needs (patient and self) to be strictly a mental health issue (not meaning that spiritual needs = mental health problems.) If so, what does spirituality mean to an atheist?
    Thank you for rephrasing your question. I was raised as an atheist and told by my parents that if I wanted a religion, I could certainly adopt one. Later in life, I did. But I will address your question anyway.

    It is not a valid question because you don't seem to think that there is a difference between religion and spirituality. There is. Spirituality does not equal belief in G-d.

    Nurses who don't believe in G-d per say are perfectly capable of understanding and having compassion for other people's beliefs. Even if my religion or actually, my practice of religion, is not the same as my patient's I am able to help them spiritually.

    Atheists are whole persons. They are not lacking the ability to be spiritual, they just choose to not be religious because they don't believe in G-d. They're not walking around with flat affect like zombies. They're people who are empathetic-- that's all you need to meet your patients where they are.

    If you don't know the difference between religion and spirituality, you will not be able to understand the patients who identify as atheists.

    It's really great that you have your religion to help you, but you really need to research the true meaning of spirituality. Otherwise, you're not getting it. You're not going to be able to care for the spirit of your patients in a true way.

    Thanks for the question. I think many are confused about the meaning of these terms.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com

  • Jul 19

    Quote from enigma2441
    WHOA!! This is exactly why I'm debating if I should even other getting my NP. I recently relocated from NY to FL and while I have a "cushy" position so to speak making 86K working from home I sometimes feel like I need to have a back up. The RN salaries in FL have me shaking my head and the NP salaries are simply atrocious. I can't see any good reason to go spend $30k or more to go back to school for less pay and more work. With that being said I honestly sometimes feel like I'm in the wrong field....
    And the scope of practice in Florida is horribly restrictive.


    Sent from my iPhone -- blame all errors on spellcheck

  • Jun 13

    Why do people think $220 k is too much for an NP? I'm honestly curious about this. Why do NPs feel unworthy? For the responsibility and work involved, I find the $200,000+ range completely reasonable.


    Sent from my iPhone -- blame all errors on spellcheck

  • Jun 5

    Quote from MedChica
    Is this a troll thread or something?

    I have an armpit length kinky/curly fro. I rec'v compliments from everyone.
    Even I didn't - I doubledog dare anyone to look me in my eyeballs and call it 'unprofessional' -- suggesting that I "do something about it".

    No. Braids, dreds, sisterlocks, fro's, etc... are not fads. They're black hair styles. It's deeply cultural.
    As for my curls -- this is how my hair naturally grows from my frickin' scalp. Hell, yeah - it's BIG! LOL I don't need to 'do something' about it. OUR hair doesn't need to be 'fixed'.
    I'm not going to alter the very structure of my hair shaft to fit some idiot interviewer's WARPED beauty ideal.
    Should I change my skin color,too? Maybe, get the fat sucked out of my lips...or butt ( could be lucrative considering all of these 'boxy'-looking pancake *expletive* females getting butt augmentation these days). LOL
    I've enough to spare!
    Absolutely! It's not about this one job interview. This is about the bigger issue of discrimination based on a person's biological appearance. No one should change their natural appearance to get a job. That is the only way to change things. Be actively true to yourself. I have crazy curls and I would never straighten my hair for an interview. I'll be clean. Professionally dressed, and wear my curls as I would on the floor (ponytail). But that's it. Activism by virtue of not changing to meet some judgemental person's idea of "proper" (ie, white with straight hair).


    Sent from my iPhone -- blame all errors on spellcheck

  • Apr 23

    I didn't say anyone on this thread said NPs are unworthy. I meant the general feeling (by MPs I've known and some people on these forums) is that NPs should not expect to make much more money than their regular nursing salary. I also see that reflected in these threads about salary when people speak of what to expect as an NP.

    I just wonder if the culture of nurses being lower on the pay/respect hierarchy that is prevalent in the healthcare system is being carried onto the advanced practice field. I don't think this is good for business or the well-being of the profession. No NP should start below $100,000 in any area of the country in my opinion. That's just my feeling on the issue and I wish more NPs asked for fair pay. That's all.


    Sent from my iPhone -- blame all errors on spellcheck

  • Apr 23

    Why do people think $220 k is too much for an NP? I'm honestly curious about this. Why do NPs feel unworthy? For the responsibility and work involved, I find the $200,000+ range completely reasonable.


    Sent from my iPhone -- blame all errors on spellcheck

  • Apr 16

    Why do people think $220 k is too much for an NP? I'm honestly curious about this. Why do NPs feel unworthy? For the responsibility and work involved, I find the $200,000+ range completely reasonable.


    Sent from my iPhone -- blame all errors on spellcheck

  • Apr 15

    Honestly, the mobile app is what alerted me to this forum because on the What's New feed, everything shows up by time of posting. Also, the name of the forum it was posted on is in tiny font in a lighter tone, so sometimes it is missed -- especially if the post title is interesting.

    I'm usually drawn to posts from this forum because they are very real, human experiences. Also, because I do not have experience with the recovery process and it intrigues me. I have learned a lot about stipulations and different approaches from this forum. As someone else mentioned, it is not a subject people are open about. I only met one nurse who had been caught diverting narcotics and his story was my idea of how things went down in general. He told about how wonderful his employer had been, how he went into inpatient rehab and was transferred to work within the same system as an addiction specialist. Never lost his job or benefits, it was like a fairy tale story. Now I realize he must have had stipulations from the BON too. Unless the employer handled it all in-house? I wish I'd known what to ask back then... He was giving a talk during orientation to encourage those with addiction issues to speak up and voluntarily enter the state program. Crazy! He never mentioned the legal aspect of dealing with the BON. He made the program sound like an understanding environment where if you self-reported you would be supported and not punished...

    The stories of success are wonderful, although often I am left with anger towards the strictness and across the board mentality of the BONs. It seems the punishment is too harsh for the "crime" on many occasions.

    Anyway, I appreciate the wisdom of this forum. Thank you all for sharing your experiences.

  • Apr 12

    I do think that is too old to start nursing school, unless you have a clear goal in mind. For example, you have a job lined up before even starting (as in, a friend with a family practice wants to hire you at their office). I had a classmate who was about 60 during school, but she wanted to do the psych NP right after as this was her passion and she was already a therapist. She wanted to prescribe.

    I cannot see a new grad in their 60s getting hired in today's job market.

    The homebirth midwife is another thing altogether. They already have a practice and will probably go on to a CNM. So again, they have a clear purpose for that degree.

    It's not ageism, it's reality. Nursing, bedside in particular, is a draining job.


    Sent from my iPhone -- blame all errors on spellchecker 😉

  • Mar 27

    Honestly, the mobile app is what alerted me to this forum because on the What's New feed, everything shows up by time of posting. Also, the name of the forum it was posted on is in tiny font in a lighter tone, so sometimes it is missed -- especially if the post title is interesting.

    I'm usually drawn to posts from this forum because they are very real, human experiences. Also, because I do not have experience with the recovery process and it intrigues me. I have learned a lot about stipulations and different approaches from this forum. As someone else mentioned, it is not a subject people are open about. I only met one nurse who had been caught diverting narcotics and his story was my idea of how things went down in general. He told about how wonderful his employer had been, how he went into inpatient rehab and was transferred to work within the same system as an addiction specialist. Never lost his job or benefits, it was like a fairy tale story. Now I realize he must have had stipulations from the BON too. Unless the employer handled it all in-house? I wish I'd known what to ask back then... He was giving a talk during orientation to encourage those with addiction issues to speak up and voluntarily enter the state program. Crazy! He never mentioned the legal aspect of dealing with the BON. He made the program sound like an understanding environment where if you self-reported you would be supported and not punished...

    The stories of success are wonderful, although often I am left with anger towards the strictness and across the board mentality of the BONs. It seems the punishment is too harsh for the "crime" on many occasions.

    Anyway, I appreciate the wisdom of this forum. Thank you all for sharing your experiences.

  • Mar 21

    Honestly, the mobile app is what alerted me to this forum because on the What's New feed, everything shows up by time of posting. Also, the name of the forum it was posted on is in tiny font in a lighter tone, so sometimes it is missed -- especially if the post title is interesting.

    I'm usually drawn to posts from this forum because they are very real, human experiences. Also, because I do not have experience with the recovery process and it intrigues me. I have learned a lot about stipulations and different approaches from this forum. As someone else mentioned, it is not a subject people are open about. I only met one nurse who had been caught diverting narcotics and his story was my idea of how things went down in general. He told about how wonderful his employer had been, how he went into inpatient rehab and was transferred to work within the same system as an addiction specialist. Never lost his job or benefits, it was like a fairy tale story. Now I realize he must have had stipulations from the BON too. Unless the employer handled it all in-house? I wish I'd known what to ask back then... He was giving a talk during orientation to encourage those with addiction issues to speak up and voluntarily enter the state program. Crazy! He never mentioned the legal aspect of dealing with the BON. He made the program sound like an understanding environment where if you self-reported you would be supported and not punished...

    The stories of success are wonderful, although often I am left with anger towards the strictness and across the board mentality of the BONs. It seems the punishment is too harsh for the "crime" on many occasions.

    Anyway, I appreciate the wisdom of this forum. Thank you all for sharing your experiences.

  • Mar 9

    Honestly, the mobile app is what alerted me to this forum because on the What's New feed, everything shows up by time of posting. Also, the name of the forum it was posted on is in tiny font in a lighter tone, so sometimes it is missed -- especially if the post title is interesting.

    I'm usually drawn to posts from this forum because they are very real, human experiences. Also, because I do not have experience with the recovery process and it intrigues me. I have learned a lot about stipulations and different approaches from this forum. As someone else mentioned, it is not a subject people are open about. I only met one nurse who had been caught diverting narcotics and his story was my idea of how things went down in general. He told about how wonderful his employer had been, how he went into inpatient rehab and was transferred to work within the same system as an addiction specialist. Never lost his job or benefits, it was like a fairy tale story. Now I realize he must have had stipulations from the BON too. Unless the employer handled it all in-house? I wish I'd known what to ask back then... He was giving a talk during orientation to encourage those with addiction issues to speak up and voluntarily enter the state program. Crazy! He never mentioned the legal aspect of dealing with the BON. He made the program sound like an understanding environment where if you self-reported you would be supported and not punished...

    The stories of success are wonderful, although often I am left with anger towards the strictness and across the board mentality of the BONs. It seems the punishment is too harsh for the "crime" on many occasions.

    Anyway, I appreciate the wisdom of this forum. Thank you all for sharing your experiences.


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