Bedside computer charting

  1. Just wondering how pushing the computer stand around a med/surg/ortho floor will work out. My little hospital has decided to come into the 21st century and is readying itself to go to bedside computer charting. They had us looking at stands this week, which was a pretty skewed comparison, but thats another story. Anyway,, am wondering with all the cords, hoses, pumps etc we use on surg units how easy is it really to mobilize these things.
    It just seems like it will be a real pain, pushing these things into a double room already cramped with walkers, cords etc. Any experiences?
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   PMHNP10
    Quote from meownsmile
    Just wondering how pushing the computer stand around a med/surg/ortho floor will work out. My little hospital has decided to come into the 21st century and is readying itself to go to bedside computer charting. They had us looking at stands this week, which was a pretty skewed comparison, but thats another story. Anyway,, am wondering with all the cords, hoses, pumps etc we use on surg units how easy is it really to mobilize these things.
    It just seems like it will be a real pain, pushing these things into a double room already cramped with walkers, cords etc. Any experiences?
    I have mixed feelings on this. I did not ever use the mobile ones; the hospital I worked at had a computer in each room. On the positive is that you can do all of your charting right there while doing your assessment...forget something???? just double check and make the entry...wonderful convenience. Negative...so impersonal IMO. Our terminals were facing away from the pt, so I had to turn my back to the pt while charting. I think the mobile ones would eliminate this problem. You can now sit down and face the pt while you enter your assessment. :stone
  4. by   ~Anne~
    You guys are lucky... we're supposed to start computerized charting soon...but our computers are in our chart room, so we have to assess our pt. and give their meds then go back and enter everything into the computer ..I still cant figure out how this is gonna work. Anyone else have to do it this way? It seems like it will be very time consuming (just what we needed)
  5. by   memphispanda
    We switched to computer charting recently. The idea was for us to roll the carts into the pt room for assessments, but in reality, it just doesn't work. The carts don't roll well for one thing, and the actual pushing around of the cart adds a lot of time to the process. Not to mention it's an infection control nightmare--too many MRSA pts for my comfort. About the only time the computers are actually being pushed into the rooms is for admission history and admission assessments.
  6. by   meownsmile
    Thanks for the replys. They had us rolling cart up and down the hall last week, to see which one we preferred(like it is going to matter anyway, they will buy which one the administration can get cheapest). Each one had difference,, plus the battery packs on each weighed differently, so it was no real comparison. Give me 3 batteries of the same weight then ill tell you which one i like the best.
    Didnt really think about infection control, OMG, that could be a real challenge. Not only the MRSA but just the fact the keyboard will carry so much in the way of bacteria/virus/microbes. Thats just scary to think about. Will have to see what happens. Still dont know how it will work, we have nurses now that are scared of our computers that we put orders in and do our care plans on, how are they going to learn to do the computer charting. This should be very interesting. I try to be a good change agent, but i have some real reservations about this. Just wondered how everyone else was getting along with it.
  7. by   nurs1forall
    We have been using computer charting at our facility for 4-5 years now, but have only recently introduced mobile lap tops on carts. The concept was good, get the nurses back out on the floor, where they are visible and accessable to the patients and families, however, in reality they are cumbersome, impersonal, and like others have mentioned an infection control issue. What I have found most of the floor nurses have resorted to was to complete their assessments, while leaving the laptops outside the room, then input their information right outside the room. Most of them find this an acceptable alternative. Otherwise they would have to go to one of the main computers, tucked away in a room. I'm hoping for palm-pilots in the future, they are small enough to fit into the pockets of your jackets or scrub tops, and weigh almost nothing. Hope this little tid bit offers you a little more insight



    Quote from meownsmile
    Just wondering how pushing the computer stand around a med/surg/ortho floor will work out. My little hospital has decided to come into the 21st century and is readying itself to go to bedside computer charting. They had us looking at stands this week, which was a pretty skewed comparison, but thats another story. Anyway,, am wondering with all the cords, hoses, pumps etc we use on surg units how easy is it really to mobilize these things.
    It just seems like it will be a real pain, pushing these things into a double room already cramped with walkers, cords etc. Any experiences?
  8. by   RN-PA
    We computerized our documentation in December 2003 and at first, I used to take my C.O.W. (computer on wheels) into the patient rooms and chart as I went. They're somewhat cumbersome and just fit in the space between the end of the beds and the chairs against the wall. If there's a patient or visitor in the chairs, they have to get up and move or I won't fit through. For fairly stable patients, I could get through the charting quickly, but found I couldn't assess all 5-6 (to 7) of my patients (besides hang IV meds due at 1600, call docs, check charts, give pain meds, etc.) before dinner would arrive at 1700. So I scribble down all abnormals for my assesments on my patient profile sheet and document later. I always take the computer in for admissions.

    What I like about the computers on wheels is when the nurse's station is jammed with doctors, social workers, case management, dietary, and all the rest, I can find a quiet place in a hallway to work on my computer.
  9. by   meownsmile
    Acutally having a palm that we can download into the computer later sounds like a way to go. Much more portable and less cumbersome. Wow, can imagine popping in patient info at the bedside. Making notes on patients as you go, then just plugging into the mainframe and downloading it before you clock out and hand the palm over to the next shift. Now that sounds like a solution. HMMM,, change agent,, change agent. Maybe ill input some suggestions next week at work.

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