Advice for the new nurse entering Med-Surg - page 19

Here is your chance to give some advice and counsel to new RN's and LPN's entering their first clinical job as a nurse. What advice would you give them? I am going to make this a sticky so that... Read More

  1. Visit  CPLove2013 profile page
    3
    Don't get so hung up on passing medications. I understand that some medications are time sensitive, but if the pharmacy profiles your sliding scale insulin for 1130 but lunch trays are late and don't show up until 1300 you insulin will just be late. Make a note reflecting that. I see too many of our new nurses and even nursing students so fixated on timing that they are unable to make adjustments when unexpected things happen. ASSESS your patients first thing! If you become so fixated on passing the meds that you haven't assessed your patient until after med pass, I guarantee you that's when something will change with your patient or the physician will ask you how their lungs sounded and you won't have a baseline. BE FLEXIBLE. Nothing in the nursing real world works quite the same as the nursing books taught you.

    And when you think the world is crumbling around you, take a deep breath. I promise your more than likely doing a better job then you think you are. And find an appropriate healthy method of stress relief outside of work. Reading, exercise etc.
    happyrn001, zzravizz, and big al lpn like this.
  2. Visit  SusuMarieRN profile page
    0
    Amen to that !!! lol!
  3. Visit  thenursemandy profile page
    1
    Tips:
    1. Don't act like a know it all. Be confident, but humble to those with more experience.
    2. Don't be afraid to call Docs. They're a means to an end.
    3. If you don't know a procedure, look it up. Don't try to "wing it".
    4. Everybody have bad days, nurses included. However, when you do, remind yourself of 2 things:
    A. It could be worse. YOU could be admitted to the hospital!
    B. Your pt is the reason that you even have a job. Be thankful.
    5. Come up with a good "brain sheet" to keep yourself organized.
    zzravizz likes this.
  4. Visit  2bAngilRN profile page
    2
    Quote from thenursemandy
    Tips:
    1. Don't act like a know it all. Be confident, but humble to those with more experience.
    2. Don't be afraid to call Docs. They're a means to an end.
    3. If you don't know a procedure, look it up. Don't try to "wing it".
    4. Everybody have bad days, nurses included. However, when you do, remind yourself of 2 things:
    A. It could be worse. YOU could be admitted to the hospital!
    B. Your pt is the reason that you even have a job. Be thankful.
    5. Come up with a good "brain sheet" to keep yourself organized.
    I keep reading throughout ALL NURSES about brain sheets. I need an example or examples of a good brain sheet.
    Rayanne203 and zzravizz like this.
  5. Visit  thehumbleRN profile page
    1
    Love the posts above. I'm only a few weeks in but here is a few:

    I have found that arriving early and preparing before getting started will help to reduce anxiety everytime.

    Take the opportunity to jump into do something as a 'first' as much as you can.

    Find someone to communicate with as a mentor.

    Start to go over policy and procedures a little at a time and keep reviewing meds a little at a time.

    Give yourself Grace and be patient with yourself as you learn. This is not an easy job.

    You can do this. Have Faith in yourself.
    zzravizz likes this.
  6. Visit  floatnurse29 profile page
    0
    These are very good tips.
  7. Visit  thehumbleRN profile page
    1
    Thank you so much. It's been quite the uphill battle for me but I really do love nursing. This past week has been especially challenging.
    zzravizz likes this.
  8. Visit  zzravizz profile page
    0
    Quote from JeskaRN2011
    I don't want to scare you but I'm in my 4th week of training on a Surgical floor and I couldn't imagine being on my own after just a few days! In school one of our teachers told us that if a job was not going to offer you sufficient training time then NOT to take the job, you're only setting yourself up for failure! Again I'm not trying to scare you and I wish you all the luck in the world! Just thought I would share!
    How are you doing now?
  9. Visit  iowa27 profile page
    1
    Need help here.....I've just become an RN after a long career in another field. I've just been hired to start on a med-surg floor and have now completed my 6th shift with my preceptor.
    I'm very frustrated with myself and can't help but think that my preceptor is going crazy, even though I continually get positive feedback.
    I'm finding that there is so much to "take in" throughout the day, while I normally keep up, I know it's only because I have someone "holding my hand.
    I feel as though I'm always asking some of the same questions before it finally "sinks in", while I know I'm slow because I'm scared to death that I'm about to kill my patient by giving the wrong med, wrong time, etc.

    During hand-off there seems to be so much info given that much of the info starts to get lost on me, and I feel as though I'm shutting down before I even start the day.

    I really want to succeed at this, but am wondering if the stress of this is worth it at my age.

    Any advice out there?

    Thanks in advance
    outside_child likes this.
  10. Visit  PacoUSA profile page
    3
    Quote from iowa27
    Need help here.....I've just become an RN after a long career in another field. I've just been hired to start on a med-surg floor and have now completed my 6th shift with my preceptor.
    I'm very frustrated with myself and can't help but think that my preceptor is going crazy, even though I continually get positive feedback.
    I'm finding that there is so much to "take in" throughout the day, while I normally keep up, I know it's only because I have someone "holding my hand.
    I feel as though I'm always asking some of the same questions before it finally "sinks in", while I know I'm slow because I'm scared to death that I'm about to kill my patient by giving the wrong med, wrong time, etc.

    During hand-off there seems to be so much info given that much of the info starts to get lost on me, and I feel as though I'm shutting down before I even start the day.

    I really want to succeed at this, but am wondering if the stress of this is worth it at my age.

    Any advice out there?

    Thanks in advance
    The problem with med-surg is that there are too many patients per nurse, and too many details to keep track of. Ask me if so-and-so has COPD and I will literally pause for 5 seconds to think if that is true. Patients are also sicker now than they were 30 years ago and medications are also more diverse and complex. To get more than 4 patients these days I feel is already substandard care. When the job becomes more about "getting crap done" and less about "lets think about what we need to do to get this patient better care," it's not nursing anymore. And I do think many nurses are simply not programmed to work with more than a couple of patients at a a time. I've been a nurse for 3 years and I still detest having anything above 3 patients. I was once floated to a cardiac stepdown with 3 patients to care for and I felt like I could do it forever. I don't mind being busy at all, but give me a manageable and realistic workload, damnit! This is one reason I want to transition more towards critical care.

    Anyway, to answer your question: it takes time to get it. Be more patient with yourself. Your experience sounds a lot like mine when I started and I am also a 2nd career nurse. It's not easy starting over, but the rewards are awaiting you. I now sit here very glad I got to where I am through perseverance and positive thinking, and you can too. Eventually you will get to the point where you will finally get it!


    Sent from my iPad using allnurses
    seconddegreebsn, iowa27, and DBK99 like this.
  11. Visit  iowa27 profile page
    0
    Thanks Pacu, I've just posted this in a new thread, but I certainly appreciate your advice. I'm hopeful that I someday get to that point where I'm confident and that "I do get it".
  12. Visit  ADPIE.RN profile page
    0
    I love all the advice here, thank you.. I can't even sleep at night knowing that my first shift on a MS-Post-op floor starts this Tuesday! I am a new nurse, and currently in a speacialty training program that 7 weeks long on my unit. I am just so afraid of making a mistake or not meeting my patients needs.

Need Help Searching For Someone's Comment? Enter your keywords in the box below and we will display any comment that matches your keywords.



Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top
close
close