Lpn? Rn? Bsn? Help me out here ;)

  1. Howdeehoo people. My first post at this forum after lurking here for a while, so im thinking a little introduction probably is needed: Male nursing student, half-way in a 3-year bachelor of nursing in Norway (which automatically leads to an official nursing license).

    What I was wondering about is the different nursing degrees you people are talking about. Would anybody care to give me a crash course in how long the studies take for each type of education, what type of job one gets when finished and the duties one has when employed?

    Thanks in advance,
    J.
    •  
  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   nesher
    OK crash course in the craziness that is nursing education in the US.
    Three different levels of education to reach RN
    1) ASN also known as AD - (associate degree) 2 years (community colleges)
    2) Diploma - 3 years (university)
    3) BSN -4 years (university) Several ways to accomplish this degree including those that already have an ASN and attend a program designed for working nurses.

    All three levels take the same licensing exam and may be working side by side in any number of settings.
    A trend is developing however that hospitals, clinics etc. look in particular for BSN nurses.
    BSN nurses have more opportunites in terms of moving from position to position and advancement including of course further education in the role of an advanced practice nurse in terms of MN (master of nursing ) and MSN.

    This topic is subject to great debate in this country which I won't get into here.
    Did this help?
  4. by   suzanne4
    Diploma can also be a two year hospital program, which most of them are.
    Whether you graduate form an Associate program, a Diploma program, or a Bachelor's program, you are permitted to sit for the NCLEX-RN exam.

    However, if you are a foreign grad wishing to work in the US, then the requirements change. US law requires that you are what they call a "professional" nurse in your country, which usually means a four-year degree. In some cases, the three year program is acceptable, but the two year overseas degree will not get you licensure in the US.

    Hope that this helps................
  5. by   nesher
    I beg to differ with you regarding nurses from other countries neeeding a a 3-4 year nursing education. I recently worked with a Swiss nurse who had a 2 year education and was in a BSN program here. Yes she was working - foreign nurses have a plethora of exams to take to practice here however.
  6. by   beochicken
    Thanks, all your posts helped a lot. One last question though: can an lpn do the same work as a bsn? Meaning: can they hook up iv lines, administer painkillers and so on at the same level as a bsn when working in a hospital? Or do they have restrictions on what they can do compared to a bsn? This is not meant as an insult to those of you who have this degree. Im just wondering.
  7. by   suzanne4
    Quote from nesher
    I beg to differ with you regarding nurses from other countries neeeding a a 3-4 year nursing education. I recently worked with a Swiss nurse who had a 2 year education and was in a BSN program here. Yes she was working - foreign nurses have a plethora of exams to take to practice here however.
    In order to apply for a green card on her own, the two year degree isn't accepted. However, if she has a spousal green card, or work permit because of a spouse, then that is completely a different matter.

    I am speaking of nurses that are applying here on their own for a green card. These are now the US requirements..............please look under the International section for more info on this..............
  8. by   suzanne4
    Quote from beochicken
    Thanks, all your posts helped a lot. One last question though: can an lpn do the same work as a bsn? Meaning: can they hook up iv lines, administer painkillers and so on at the same level as a bsn when working in a hospital? Or do they have restrictions on what they can do compared to a bsn? This is not meant as an insult to those of you who have this degree. Im just wondering.
    It depends on the state where the nurse is working. Each has its own rulings. Some states severely restrict the LPN license and inn others they can administer bloodd, give some IV medications, and hang IV fluids. Each state can specify what the nurse can do under their jurisdiction. Hospitals can set further limits if they so desire.
  9. by   suzanne4
    Quote from nesher
    I beg to differ with you regarding nurses from other countries neeeding a a 3-4 year nursing education. I recently worked with a Swiss nurse who had a 2 year education and was in a BSN program here. Yes she was working - foreign nurses have a plethora of exams to take to practice here however.
    And was her two year degree obatined in the US or overseas? If in the US, there is no problem as that is considered a professional degree over here. But in many other countries it is not.
  10. by   nesher
    No an LPN can't do the same things as an BSN RN - I am unclear as to the restrictions as I work in an institution that is all RN staff. It does seem to vary though based on what I read on allnurses.
  11. by   nesher
    My Swiss nurse friend was educated in her country - and she isn't married - though she is here with her boyfriend who is here to doing research.
  12. by   suzanne4
    Quote from nesher
    My Swiss nurse friend was educated in her country - and she isn't married - though she is here with her boyfriend who is here to doing research.
    She may have come over when H1-B visas were available. To work under a green card now, the two year overseas degree is not accepted. These types of visas are no longer available and things are much tighter now. To even be able to apply for the green card, you have to go thru Visa Screen and thet wo year degree isn't accepted by them.

    However, if the nurse trains in the US, then there is no problem.

    Your friend can also be on an F-1 visa, and with special permission from immigration, is allowed to work after one year here. There are quite a few things that you may not be aware of.
  13. by   suzanne4
    Quote from nesher
    No an LPN can't do the same things as an BSN RN - I am unclear as to the restrictions as I work in an institution that is all RN staff. It does seem to vary though based on what I read on allnurses.
    The biggest major difference is that they cannot do the initial shift assessment, no matter which state. That is strictly limited to the RN role, whether it be ADN, Diploma, or BSN. There are many facilities that use LPNs in quite a few roles. I used ot work with several in ICUs in major teaching facilities and they were able to do almost everything that the RN could. Again, it depends on the state that you are in, as well as the facility.
  14. by   augigi
    I have a three year degree from Australia and am licensed as a professional registered nurse here. My course (uni) was called "Bachelor of Nursing".

    I also have a one year postgraduate diploma (uni + hospital) in critical care nursing.


    I know I'd have to ask each individual school, but do you think I would be able to get direct entry into a MSN course in the US, or would have to make up units since I did a 3 yr degree instead of 4?

    Thanks.

close