I am in college and want to switch to get bachlor in RN

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    I see that some people say they become an Rn in 18months. I am enrolled in the university of phoenix online and they only offer a BS to become an Rn. I am not sure that I understand this correctly. I have no experience in nursing been in construction my whole life. Can I simply take the 18month program to be an Rn without any experience or do I need experience as a CNA first? If anybody can help me with the best route and steps to take that would be sweet. Or should i just continue to get my BS in RN? Help
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    Quote from jason165
    I see that some people say they become an Rn in 18months. I am enrolled in the university of phoenix online and they only offer a BS to become an Rn. I am not sure that I understand this correctly. I have no experience in nursing been in construction my whole life. Can I simply take the 18month program to be an Rn without any experience or do I need experience as a CNA first? If anybody can help me with the best route and steps to take that would be sweet. Or should i just continue to get my BS in RN? Help
    Let me see of I can help you sort this out bro. This may be a long post, but stay with me.

    You have several types of RN programs and avenues. You have the traditional BSN, which is kind of like what you are doing. For years of school for a bachelors in nursing. You have an accelerated BSN program which usually runs about 12 to 18 months give or take, but these programs usually require you to have a bachelors already. (this is what I'm in) These programs are shorter because they are providing you with just nursing courses because you have everything else on your 1st bachelors. They are called fast track programs.

    Then you have associate degree programs which are usually 2 years long and usually offered at the community college level. They are also cheaper than 4 year schools usually

    And last but not least, you have the diploma nurse programs or hihospital based programs. They can vary from 2 to 3 years, which results in a diploma in nursing.

    All avenues lead to the RN license. You just have to pick what works for you. The BSN is probably the way to go due to the fact that a lot of hospitals are going after magnet status which prefers minimum BSN nurses on staff.

    So my advice is to do what works best for your situation. Are you far along in your program? Do you want to get your RN quickly, get a job, and work on your BSN online? That's your job to figure that out. That's the beauty of nursing, it has endless opportunities. Good luck and I hope this helps you.
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    Oh and you don't need the cna to become a nurse. If you obtain it, it will help you because you will have some patient interaction, and a introduction to healthcare. Some nursing schools require it and some don't.

    Good luck!
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    I think you may need to talk to your school advisors & clarify what they offer. Unless they have a 'real life' program - with clinical rotations at hospitals - the program is not geared for entry level nurses. It is probably an RN - BSN program for nurses who already have an associate degree.

    You will need to enroll in a pre-licensure program.... any of the options that mas28 outlined will do. All of these programs include both the classroom stuff as well as the clinical training you need to become a nurse. After you complete that degree, there is still another step - you then have to take the national licensure program (NCLEX). You aren't actually a licensed nurse until you pass NCLEX.

    Best of luck to you!


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