Experiences of the male nursing student - page 3

by framps

6,657 Views | 24 Comments

Greetings! I am currently enrolled in a BSN program and am now just a couple of months away from graduating. The experience has certainly opened my eyes to the world of nursing, in good ways and bad. I come from an EMT... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Cherish
    :yeahthat: I too when I was in the Army (recently been activated to deploy so now BACK IN!) was called a female soldier. Heck I was the ONLY female mechanic in my whole BATTALION and there was NO other females even in the motorpool besides me and command pmcs days. But I was use to it, yes the guys talked about stuff, that I wouldn't even consider talking about but they didn't care cause they honestly saw me as one of the 'guys'. I prefer to work with males, they don't gossip or bicker (they sure do gossip about females and sex though!), they treated me as their little sister and made sure no one messed with me (didn't ask for that but hey! :chuckle ), and they were REALLY funny. I too like to be seen by female doctors, I feel uncomfortable with a male doctor examining me and feeling my breasts. So it's really up to the patient. I wouldn't mind a male nurse at all, but if its being hospitalized and I'm on a bedpan thats a different story kinda uncomfortable and embarrased with that one
    The equal opportunity and treatment you recieve in the army should be no less than the opportunity and treatment that a male gets. That being said, you are wrong to deny them the opportuity to perform their jobs as nurses. Let's say a male mechanic might feel better knowing a male mechanic is holding up that 150 pound transmission while he bolts it up, but there you are. Does he prefer to have another male with more upperbody strength than you holding it up so he doesn't get smashed? Probably. Will that pass the muster? No. So why should your comfort level be more important than his?
  2. 0
    Quote from vortex72
    Heh, I feel ya man. I graduated back in 97 and I HATED wearing that ice cream outfit. Now I wear surgical scrubs to work and have a sweet job in acute dialysis making 80-100k/year. Stick it out, its worth it :chuckle
    I am a male LPN with 1 year experience. I also hold a B.S. in management and two asociates degrees. I want to pursue dialysis work. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
  3. 0
    Quote from vortex72
    Heh, I feel ya man. I graduated back in 97 and I HATED wearing that ice cream outfit. Now I wear surgical scrubs to work and have a sweet job in acute dialysis making 80-100k/year. Stick it out, its worth it :chuckle
    What's the difference between acute dialysis and regular?
  4. 0
    Well, in the Army the female does not have the same opportunities a male has various reasons, physical strength being one of them. There is little doubt in my mind that if something heavy needed to be held the stronger person would hold it, even if that meant the female was excluded.

    That said, you asked, "why should your comfort level be more important than his?" Because I am the patient. It's not about HIM and never will be. It's about my comfort and security. I believe male nurses can be caring and competent care providers. I'm sure there are some that are better than most female nurses. I am comfortable with a male care provider. editing to say: just not in childbirth or gyn areas...

    Quote from Silverhawk
    The equal opportunity and treatment you recieve in the army should be no less than the opportunity and treatment that a male gets. That being said, you are wrong to deny them the opportuity to perform their jobs as nurses. Let's say a male mechanic might feel better knowing a male mechanic is holding up that 150 pound transmission while he bolts it up, but there you are. Does he prefer to have another male with more upperbody strength than you holding it up so he doesn't get smashed? Probably. Will that pass the muster? No. So why should your comfort level be more important than his?
    Last edit by CEG on Mar 28, '05
  5. 0
    Acute dialysis is hemodialysis for hospital patients. Some may be very sick and unstable in the ICU or some may simply be ESRD patients who came in the hospital for something routine and need hemo while they're in.

    Typically, LPN's are not utilized in bedside acute dialysis (i.e. in the ICU). Most companies only hire RN's with acute dialysis experience. LPN's are used mainly in chronic dialysis but we have an acute clinic where LPN's are used in the clinic environment. They arent paid as much as we are but from what I've been told their LPN pay is much higher than available elsewhere.


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