Chose Nursing as a career

  1. 0
    I'm 20 and decided on nursing as a career. I have never been this excited before to start something, and i'm glad I am choosing this path.

    However, i'm a bit confused on how I should approach it. My local CC has a good associate's degree program, so I believe i'll go with that. I'm saving for tuition right now, but is there any tips when filling out my FAFSA? Also, should I get my associate's, get some work experience then go back for my Bachelor's? Or go straight to school again?

    Also, is long hair as a guy a problem in hospital's? I know, just cut it. But

    Thank you for any advice.
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  4. 5 Comments so far...

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    I know as far as FAFSA is concerned, the less money you draw in, the more money you get. If you're still dependent, the less your family makes, the more money you get. Not totally fair, but that's how it works. You could always try looking for scholarships. Go see your school's financial services for advice.

    As far as wheter or not to get your BSN flat our or to wait and go back.. Just know that there's no real pay difference in the two degrees, but there are obvious benefits to getting a BSN, such as more advancement opportunities, and if you want to go back to graduate school eventually, you'd probably need your BSN, unless you did RN-MSN or something. I'm in an ADN program now, but I plan on going back for my BSN as soon as I graduate this program. I want to be a CRNA someday and I'll need it. Plus there are other reasons I want my BSN. The school I go to, I get free tuition cause my dad works maintenance here. It's an employee benefit. If I didn't get that benefit I wouldn't be going to school here and I'd be getting my BSN straight out. So my advice is that if you plan on getting your BSN, just get it done with all at once. Weigh the benefits though. Some people can do perfectly fine without a BSN, and as far as how skilled a nurse is, it's hard if not impossible to tell an ADN nurse from a BSN nurse. BSN just tags on a few extra classes, usually more theory that seems to be replaced with experience eventually. So personally I'd go with BSN, but you should look at each closey and decide for yourself. Obviously money is an important factor. But even if you go get your ADN first, you can always go back to an RN-BSN program later. So don't sweat it too much, just go with what's best at the time. The most important thing is to become a good nurse.
  6. 0
    Hey man,

    It's awesome that you are picking nursing as your career. An ASN is a great way to start and either choice of getting experience first or going straight to BSN is good. I know plenty of people who went to BSN right after they got their ASN and I know some nurses who got their foot in the door first then went back to school. The main advantage of getting experience first though is that the hospital you work for may pay for your BSN tuition.

    As for the hair... I'm pretty sure it depends on hospital policies. But, one of my teachers is a Nurse Practitioner in the ICU and he has long hair that he has in a pony tail... so there is hope.
  7. 0
    Quote from UCFpinoSN

    As for the hair... I'm pretty sure it depends on hospital policies. But, one of my teachers is a Nurse Practitioner in the ICU and he has long hair that he has in a pony tail... so there is hope.
    :hatparty:
  8. 0
    No problem with the hair in the hospital, most guys I've seen pull it back. Nursing school may present a problem as many have strict guidelines about hair touching the collar, etc.... find out from your particular school.. Good luck, and welcome!

    Stephen
  9. 0
    Our female classmates are required to tie their hair upwards. No ponytails.


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