from LPN straight to BSN program instead of bridging to RN.

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    after doing some research, I came to the conclusion that I want to attend a university after LPN school and earn my BSN instead of bridging to RN. it's VERY hard to find LPN-RN bachelor programs. I heard there was one at Maryville University but I don't believe and couldn't get many answers from calling their Nursing department so I just decided to get my LPN and go for my BSN. I've already completed majority of my prereqs for BSN programs and after calculating time that I'll spend receiving an ADN and then going for my BSN would be 4 years and a total waste of time that I don't have to waste. Barnes has a 2.5 year BSN program that I could apply to and earn my BSN that way. I would like opinions and suggestions about it and referrals to LPN-BSN programs. thank so much !
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    I applied into a BSN program after completing the LPN program. It took me 2 years (starting off part-time before transitioning to full-time status) to complete the BSN program. I'm not sure what state you're in, but going straight into a BSN program while working as an LPN worked wonderfully for me! There's also alot of competition for nursing jobs within the region that I work/ live in, and most employers (hospital-based ones) are specifically requesting BSN applicants only. My school has an LPN-BSN bridge, but due to the high number of applicants, all nursing prereqs are required prior to applying into the program. Hope this helps!
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    Quote from Shavon3
    after doing some research, I came to the conclusion that I want to attend a university after LPN school and earn my BSN instead of bridging to RN. it's VERY hard to find LPN-RN bachelor programs. I heard there was one at Maryville University but I don't believe and couldn't get many answers from calling their Nursing department so I just decided to get my LPN and go for my BSN. I've already completed majority of my prereqs for BSN programs and after calculating time that I'll spend receiving an ADN and then going for my BSN would be 4 years and a total waste of time that I don't have to waste. Barnes has a 2.5 year BSN program that I could apply to and earn my BSN that way. I would like opinions and suggestions about it and referrals to LPN-BSN programs. thank so much !
    This is what I did many years ago instead of trying to bridge. After 30 years of being an LPN, I started taking pre req classes for my BSN at a local private non profit school that had been around a long time with an excellent reputation. I then applied to the nursing program as a non traditional student and was accepted. I did get tuition reimbursement from the hospital which helped a little bit, but it was based on tuition at the local state school that was much cheaper than the private univeristy where I went. I was given no credit for any of my LPN coursework or experience except my critical care rotation (I was a full time MICU nurse at the time). It would have taken me the about three years to finish after my prereqs were done. I ended up droping out right before my last semester because my husband got sick. After my husband died, I decided not to finish my BSN or become an RN,but decided to go into semi retirement and cut back my hours to 8 budgeted hours a week and spend more time with my family. I have no regrets about not finsihg my BSN, given that I was at the end of my full time nursing career. I loved being an LPN, but I love my family more and life is short.

    I was pushing 60 when I droped out of school. Had I been ten years younger, I would have finished without question. If you have taken all of the prereqs, including the math and science, then it won't take you a full four years. The best thing to do is to call and talk to a real person instead of looking online at "LPN to RN BSN" programs and explain your situation. I would avoid the for profit colleges that advertise "online learning" as they are expensive and often leave students in a lot of debt. Check into your local state school or non profit private college.

    It is very important to get that BSN. I had 54 wonderful years as an LPN, most of that time in critical care nursing. That BSN will give you the options you need to work in any area you wish.

    Best to you,
    Mrs H.
    tazmom likes this.
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    Mrs. H!
    that story was amazing and inspirational !
    thanks so much and I will definitely take heed to all your advice.
    HazelLPN likes this.
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    I have a question I'm curently a patien care technician working in the emergency room Which mean i have my phlebotomist , ekg, CNA , certification i also have my associate in health care adminitration ... And i took my intravenouce certification which mean i can put iv .. But im not allowed to ... Lol.. Im also a medical assistant and biller and coder .. Well the question is since i have all of my nursing pre - req i would like to know which would be a smarter route for me ... if going to lpn school then BSN or just going straigth in to RN - school then to BSN .... I was also wondering since i have my associate in health care would it shorten the lpn to bsn process ... Lpn is 11 moth RN 2 years Lpn to bsn 2 - 4 years RN to BSN 1.5 year But i would like to know if having an associate plus lpn plus Rn pre- re would only mean i have to go,for school for 11 moth plus 1.5 year to get my BSN. .? Is that posible ? Because i heard of people who has a BA in what ever concentration and obtain a master in nursing so lpn plus Ass degreed would be a short cut rigth ?


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