When did AORN become an elitist political organization? - page 2

I have been an LVN in Texas for 9 years. I have worked in the OR as a scrub and anesthesia tech(one of very few Certified Anesthesia Technologists in the US) for 13 years. Upon successful completion of my NCLEX-VN, I joined... Read More

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    Quote from mgordonlvn
    I have been an LVN in Texas for 9 years. I have worked in the OR as a scrub and anesthesia tech(one of very few Certified Anesthesia Technologists in the US) for 13 years.

    Upon successful completion of my NCLEX-VN, I joined AORN(Association of Operating Room Nurses) and began studying for the CNOR(Certified Nurse in the Operating Room) certification exam. I spent close to $200 on exam-prep materials from AORN and other sources. A justifiable expense since the facility I worked for would pay a $2/hr certification bonus.

    I studied until I new the material inside/out and upside-down. I sent in my exam registration form(which made no mention of an RN-licensure requirement). Two weeks later I received a nice(read: condescending) hand-written note and my cashier's check saying that I could not take the exam because I was ONLY an LVN.:angryfire

    Subsequently, I let my AORN membership lapse...

    Before this year's Congress in New Orleans, my director asked if I would be interested in joining AORN...apparently, they are having some sort of membership drive. I decided that since I am nearing completion of my LVN-to-RN transition coursework that I would take a look at it. I go to the web-site and WHATTAYAKNOW!?! They have changed the name of the organization to Association of periOperative Registered Nurses?!?!?!?! And...now you cannot even join as an LVN!!!

    I am sick of listening to RNs complain about "lesser educated members of the nursing field", then turning to us for help when they can't find their butts with both hands, a flashlight, and the AORN Best Practice guidelines for "Finding Your Own Butt!"

    Seems to me that there is a concerted effort by many nursing groups to force the more cost-effective LVN/LPN into extinction simply to preserve the purity of their clubs. I think this has happened before...Zieg Hiel!

    Ich bin LVN!

    I am surprised that your operating room or any nurse educator within your hospital did not inform you of this before you started studying, and, of course, before they promised to reimburse you. It's been that way for a long, long, LONG time (I have been an operating room nurse for nearly 30 years, and I cannot recall it being any other way--even before certification was even OFFERED)--AORN's official policy, and state law in many states, requires that any nurse who CIRCULATES in the operating room MUST BE AN RN. Now, you can SCRUB--you and your facility may even refer to your job description as "operating room nurse---" but AORN does not recognize you that way. It's been known as "The Association of periOperative REGISTERED Nurses for at LEAST 5 years.

    RNs who point this out to people are NOT generally trying to be condescending or unkind--they are merely trying to save people from disappointment that you experienced. Had someone pointed it out to YOU, they would have saved you time, money, grief, anger and heartache. I would make CERTAIN that they reimburse you, since they failed to advise you.

    AORN won't allow even experienced RNs who do not have BSNs to sit for the national RNFA exam. This became a rule, I believe, in 2000. I took a course before 2000 and actually could have taken the RNFA exam at that time under a "grandfathering" clause. However, my interests had gone in other directions by that time, so I didn't bother--I don't regret it. RNFAs have their share of headaches with reimbursement and other billing issues, and I'm fine doing legal nurse consulting and just being a "worker bee" (scrubbing and circulating) when I'm in the OR. I don't want to make rounds, write orders, or anything else--just go home after my 8 hours or 12 hours and not one second later.

    In fact, membership in AORN is not particularly important to me----I have yet to attend a conference or chapter meeting, and I rarely get a chance to read the journals--when I do, the letters are about the same old non-issues that we were discussing at length 30 years ago; people trying to re-invent the wheel (i.e., "Should I cover my back table when our case has been opened, but is delayed?" or "Here's a tip--did you know that you can use a Penrose drain as a tourniquet?") However, one "perk" is that the AORN library in denver will fax you various standards, guidelines etc. for free, upon request, and I very often need those in medical legal cases. Without memberhip. I'd have to pay for them--thus, I keep my membership current.
    Last edit by stevierae on Apr 26, '05

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  2. 0
    At our hospital an LPN is our OR Nurse manager. She is an excellent OR nurse and has been for over 20 years. Also, a male nurse at our facility is an ADN grad and just received his RNFA.
    Eeyore
  3. 0
    Quote from witnurse
    At our hospital an LPN is our OR Nurse manager. She is an excellent OR nurse and has been for over 20 years. Also, a male nurse at our facility is an ADN grad and just received his RNFA.
    Eeyore
    Your OR nurse manager probably does not circulate in rooms--EVER. She may, indeed, have gotten away with circulating in rooms for over 20 years--but AORN sure didn't know about it. In every state in which I have ever worked, one MUST be an RN to circulate. It's the law. New Hampshire may allow certain things according to their nurse practice act that are not allowed in other states.

    He (the AA grad, as I am) had to have been grandfathered, in some way. Maybe he was a PA in the military, or something? Could he be a PA simply referring to himself as an RNFA? Could he be using RNFA as a title--but not be recognized or certified by AORN, perhaps? I can't imagine whyAORN might have made an exception for him--but, if you are curious, simply call and ask AORN. They may not be aware he is using the title.

    Interestingly, I took my RNFA course IN New Hampshire--at Elliot Hospital, (Manchester) in 1999----and the 2 RNFAs who taught it emphasized very heavily the need to finish our coursework and clinical hours and have it turned in before 2000---otherwise we would no longer be eligible to sit for the exam.
    Last edit by stevierae on Apr 26, '05
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    Quote from witnurse
    At our hospital an LPN is our OR Nurse manager. She is an excellent OR nurse and has been for over 20 years. Also, a male nurse at our facility is an ADN grad and just received his RNFA.
    Eeyore
    I actually have my RNFA, and am a Diploma gradutate. But I do not have my certification...............you can go thru the training and even work as one, but you will not be able to sit for the certification exam.

    I just never had the time to prepare for the exam, too many other things going on when you could get the certification without the BSN. ( I have a BS in physiology, as well as an MBA, so would never consider going back for a BSN.)
    Your RNFA, is not certified, is working directly for the hospital and is not being paid or reimbursed by the insurance companies............big difference.


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