LPN...not good enough?? - page 11

by em1025

18,917 Views | 105 Comments

So, I have been an LPN for the last 5 years and I love what I do. But one of my patients that I've had last week was an RN. Now I do not have anything against RN's at all, but she asked me if I was a nurse, and of course I say... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from giftsofgrace
    Good evening ,

    We all have to start somewhere . I am debating on doing the LPN or the RN program . The LPN will get me into a hospital , I believe . Then off to an RN degree if God allows . Stay blessed as you are but never stop climbing for the sky . I want to work in a children's hospital . I am trying to figure out how to make college affordable or free .
    I respect that you do what you need to do and you do it well .
    I know this poster meant well but, I disagree. If an LPN likes his/her job and doesnt want to become an RN, that is their prerogative. Remain educated in the most up to date practices/literature, definitely. But it is condescending to LPNs to say that it should only be a stepping stone.

    Oh, and if GrnTea is reading, excuse me. I meant his/her prerogative. Lol. I'm just pickin on ya because of a recent post.
    FranEMTnurse likes this.
  2. 0
    Quote from sauzie

    I've had a similar experience when I was ill and at an urgent care clinic. It somehow came up that I was a nursing student (at the time) and the doc asked me LPN or RN. When he heard LPN, he shook his head and told me I should have done RN. I told him that eventually I am looking to get my RN, but at the time when school became an option to me, LPN was the fastest and most attainable for me to pursue my dream career.
    I'm not sure why people think that LPN's are less than RN's...Aren't we supposed to work together for the better health of the patient?
    I think the key to take away from this experience is that you know you're a good nurse and you love what you're doing. She's the one that was carrying the negative attitude around.
    I have found so many doctors have no clue in the differences and similarities among LPNS, ADN RNs or BSN RNs. They haven't spent hours looking into it like we have when deciding which career path suits our life best at that time. I actually had the OPPOSITE experience, believe it or not. I had the opportunity to watch my OB Gyn (and long time family friend) perform a circumcision while I was at clinical one day. I was in the nursery in the hospital when she walked in. I told her "yeah, I'm here for clinicals. When she asked RN or LPN, I said RN. She said "why not do LPN? The nurses in my office are LPNs. This actually kind of proves my first point. I go to her office, my mom used to work there, plus my mom is friends with some if the nurses. And guess what? They are RNs! I just answered by saying because I want as many possibilities for employment as I can. Sheesh. I was shaking my head. I respect CNAs and LPNs who want to stay where they are, but if I want more education why on earth would a physician, and a surgeon at that, discourage someone from obtaining even an associates degree? Weird.
  3. 0
    When I went to school here in PA, I was taught that LPNs are only restricted from hanging blood, and can hang IVs
  4. 0
    Quote from Franemtnurse
    When I went to school here in PA, I was taught that LPNs are only restricted from hanging blood, and can hang IVs
    There REALLY needs to be standardization of these things. It shows the curriculum in schools is somewhat scattered. It wasn't til the last semester that we learned about hanging blood. Therefore the LPNs here would not have learned it while in school. We learned it in our critical care class which was the last semester. I think there was too much fluff crap in our first semester that the time could have been utilized better learning more things
  5. 0
    Quote from Franemtnurse
    When I went to school here in PA, I was taught that LPNs are only restricted from hanging blood, and can hang IVs
    Yes; I was IV PICC certified as an LPN in PA.

    They just broadened the scope of LPNs, RNs and NPs in PA; it is one the BON website.
  6. 0
    Quote from SleeepyRN
    There REALLY needs to be standardization of these things. It shows the curriculum in schools is somewhat scattered. It wasn't til the last semester that we learned about hanging blood. Therefore the LPNs here would not have learned it while in school. We learned it in our critical care class which was the last semester. I think there was too much fluff crap in our first semester that the time could have been utilized better learning more things
    Sleepy it's standardized by the State BON and also facility specific; I worked where I could draw labs off a PICC line, no IV push; There were RNs who couldn't draw labs off a PICC; some places have IV push machines, hence LPNs could hang IV push meds; schooling gives you enough of the essential framework of skills and knowledge you need; it is up to the facility to spell out the tasky skills that is permitted.


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