NCLEX-RN: what separates first-time passers from repeat-takers?

  1. [font='Arial Narrow']Hello -

    [font='Arial Narrow']I have read where RNs who work with recruiters have more success on the NCLEX-RN. What I saw was that two times as many RN exam takers who DID NOT work with recruiters had to retake the test, which added several months to their licensing process.

    [font='Arial Narrow']No matter what you think of recruiters, it seems apparent that they are doing something to select candidates who have a higher chance of succeeding on the first try.

    [font='Arial Narrow']Does anyone have any insights into what separates the first-time passers from the repeat-takers?
    [font='Arial Narrow']English language fluency?
    [font='Arial Narrow']Grades?
    [font='Arial Narrow']The amount of time between taking the GGFNS and NCLEX-RN?
    [font='Arial Narrow']The amount of NCLEX-RN preparation?
    [font='Arial Narrow']What?
    [font='Arial Narrow']Curious.

    [font='Arial Narrow']Salud.

    [font='Arial Narrow']Luz:angel2:
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    English proficiency is number one, as well as understanding what exactly the question is asking. Which can be quite different from the way that you are used to practicing.

    I personally don't think that nurses who work with recruiters fare any differently, not sure where you got your statistics from, because there isn't a tally kept by NCLEX or BON on this. They only have your info, not who sent you. Perhaps from a recruiter?

    Amount of preparation also. You should have done at least 4000 of the review questions by the time that you take the exam.
  4. by   paz_y_luz
    Quote from suzanne4
    English proficiency is number one, as well as understanding what exactly the question is asking. Which can be quite different from the way that you are used to practicing.

    I personally don't think that nurses who work with recruiters fare any differently, not sure where you got your statistics from, because there isn't a tally kept by NCLEX or BON on this. They only have your info, not who sent you. Perhaps from a recruiter?

    Amount of preparation also. You should have done at least 4000 of the review questions by the time that you take the exam.
    Thank you. I was skeptical about the statistics too, but it raised an interesting question about what leads to success in testing. My guess is that the English language proficiency should be somewhat higher than the minimum TOEFL score for RN immigration. I'm not sure how much higher, but the idea is that the better the English, the stronger the test taker. And test preparation makes sense too, because its knowing how to take the test - understanding the NCLEX. Luz
  5. by   suzanne4
    It isn't just regular English that is involved, but also skills in test taking and in knowing what they are actually looking for. and when doing the review questions, not just guessing, but actually knowing why the wrong answers are incorrect.
  6. by   Greengo
    Hello,

    My question is more a curiosity than anything that will help me through this process, but I was wondering, if the CGFNS examination is supposed to be a predictor of success on the NCLEX-RN examination, then why does the NCSBN website show a 40% to 60% NO PASS rate for foreign educated nurses the first time they take the test?

    G.G.
  7. by   suzanne4
    Many foreign-trained nurses actually do not take CGFNS exam first. And again as stated above, the English language is th biggest stumbling block. If you cannot understand English, you have no reason to be taking NCLEX, however, many do.
  8. by   Meladee
    Quote from paz_y_luz
    Thank you. I was skeptical about the statistics too, but it raised an interesting question about what leads to success in testing. My guess is that the English language proficiency should be somewhat higher than the minimum TOEFL score for RN immigration. I'm not sure how much higher, but the idea is that the better the English, the stronger the test taker. And test preparation makes sense too, because its knowing how to take the test - understanding the NCLEX. Luz
    CA BRN did a study to explore factors that affect NCLEX pass rates, for all nurses. It used to be on their web site. The factors were English proficeincy, years since nurse had graduated from nursing school, multiple roles such as family and work.

    CA BRN Task Force found very obvious reasons for NCLEX pass/fail!

    Foreign nurses who work with agencies are more likely to have the requirement that they engage in a full time NCLEX review and take predictor exams before they are approved to have their expenses paid by the agency to take the NCLEX. The agency cannot collect their fees from employers until the nurse is successful and the agency therefore invests in their nurse candidates. Nurses who do not study or fail the predictor exams are weeded out.
  9. by   phwl
    The answer would be: The number of times a repeat taker has taken the test.

    My wife was educated in Russia. She moved to Israel where she learned to speak, read and write Hebrew and passed their registered nurse exam. Then she immigrated here to the US, where she learned to read, write and speak English, and just passed the NCLEX-RN on the first attempt. The ony thing I can say is that she dedicated about 4-5 hours per day with her head in the books. I can also tell you that she used only ONE book, with two different year versions. She finished the test in one and one half hours.
  10. by   Meladee
    Quote from phwl
    The answer would be: The number of times a repeat taker has taken the test.

    My wife was educated in Russia. She moved to Israel where she learned to speak, read and write Hebrew and passed their registered nurse exam. Then she immigrated here to the US, where she learned to read, write and speak English, and just passed the NCLEX-RN on the first attempt. The ony thing I can say is that she dedicated about 4-5 hours per day with her head in the books. I can also tell you that she used only ONE book, with two different year versions. She finished the test in one and one half hours.
    I think your wife is to be congratulated for this accomplishment. I hope that she has a successful career.
  11. by   suzanne4
    Quote from phwl
    the answer would be: the number of times a repeat taker has taken the test.

    my wife was educated in russia. she moved to israel where she learned to speak, read and write hebrew and passed their registered nurse exam. then she immigrated here to the us, where she learned to read, write and speak english, and just passed the nclex-rn on the first attempt. the ony thing i can say is that she dedicated about 4-5 hours per day with her head in the books. i can also tell you that she used only one book, with two different year versions. she finished the test in one and one half hours.
    tell her that i said:
    congratulations!
    i personally know how hard that she has worked for this....................

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