LPN to RN - page 3

Hi, I was just wondering if there are people on here that have started out as an LPN and completed the bridge-in to their RN? Where did you do your program and are you satisfied with being an RN... Read More

  1. by   pugmum
    Quote from HOMESICKLPN
    i was trained in sept 2004 in bc and the intake before me and my class all had pharmacology, im and subq, iv monitoring and med admin. my course was indeed a cram packed year. do the lpn's on your unit hang iv bags? in my practicum i was told lpn's weren't allowed esp with k+. but where i work now if you have the courses lpn's can do all but meds on peripheral lines (including initiation). i work in alberta now, i started in acute care and i really had a hard time, too many new things (new grad, first job, new hospital, new unit, new province) i';m in extended care no and i like it but the lay out of the building makes me basically on my own (the rn is on anther floor). it's alittle more charge than i ever wanted and i don't get to spend much time with my patients at all. too much paper work.
    anywho nuff said
    yahooo bc rocks!!!! going back in the spring!!!!
    Nice to hear you're coming back! Regarding the IVS, and scope of practice, on my unit (medicine), LPNs hang and maintain any periph IV that doesn't have a med in it. Can't initiate IVs though, look after acute unstable patients, or do complex wound care. They are supposed to be phoning for doctor's orders shortly, though, something they have not been doing up to this point.

    BUT, it varies from unit to unit and hospital to hospital. In my same hospital in ER and surgery LPNs do not give out meds! But work at full scope in ECU and subacute! More and more hospitals are going to full scope though, or they will not be able to keep their LPNs after 2007. Most LPNs do not want to work with a restriction on their lisence after that date.

    it would be interesting to hear what the "scope of practice" is for LPNs in other provinces. :wink2:
  2. by   zolly786
    hey sickandtired,
    which health region are you in?
    a lot of my classmates have been paid to take bcit specialties (er, icu) by fraser health. up here in northern health, we get NOTHING. the last time they had a paid bcit course was back about 3-4 years ago. since then, it's 6 week in house training for icu, scn or er. i have a friend who is starting in icu at the end of the month up here, and she's been taking the bcit course on her own because our hospital's budget won't pay for anything. *sigh* am i frustrated? you betcha. there is very little room for educational advancement up here. i miss the lower mainland. but i digress.
    i was also curious how open your health region is to educational leave.
  3. by   pugmum
    Quote from zolly786
    hey sickandtired,
    which health region are you in?
    a lot of my classmates have been paid to take bcit specialties (er, icu) by fraser health. up here in northern health, we get NOTHING. the last time they had a paid bcit course was back about 3-4 years ago. since then, it's 6 week in house training for icu, scn or er. i have a friend who is starting in icu at the end of the month up here, and she's been taking the bcit course on her own because our hospital's budget won't pay for anything. *sigh* am i frustrated? you betcha. there is very little room for educational advancement up here. i miss the lower mainland. but i digress.
    i was also curious how open your health region is to educational leave.
    I work in the Fraser Health Authority. There has been a shortage of RNs especially critical care RNs over the last several years. I did a paper last year and actually counted on the FH website...last March they were advertising for over 76 ER RNs in FH alone, never mind CC or OR. There were also over 500 nursing vacancies in all areas at that time as well. Mind you, not all were full time, but if an RN applied for one of the mentorship openings, and made it through the interview process, they had a decent chance at getting it. Some had to wait for the next class because BCIT only takes so many students. The longest I heard of one person waiting was 9 months, but he was coming from a smaller hospitial.

    I've no idea what its like right now, but the last I heard they were still taking applications and still paying 100% tuition, books, and salary for classes and practicum time. I would check out the website if you are interested, as some of my info might be old. I'm fairly happy with my job right now, so have not been browsing the "career opportunities" :chuckle

    if you want, check out the website www.fraserhealth.ca. Too bad the Northern authority is not putting up the bucks. FH knows if it doesn't do something, Coastal Health will snag all the nurses. They were paying 100% when FH was only paying 2/3rds about a year ago, so they had to change their policy!
  4. by   AliceMaria
    hi. i am new to the forum and live in atlanta. i have been an lpn for 30 years (4 kids, horses, dogs, cats, ad nauseum) and work pretty much full time. i also have a ba in business/behavioral sciences.

    so, i'd like to go from lpn to rn and i really have no preference for 2 yr or 4 yr aside from the obvious time commitments. i have been searching the net for programs and so far, have not found one with which i am comfortable (i.e., "you can take all of our classes and pass exams and then sit for boards...but not in georgia":imbar )

    does anyone out there have personal experience with such a program? i am looking for minimal clinical time - i worked icu for eight years back in the day when lpns monitored their own swans ganz and art lines and started their own ivs and packed the wounds. it was a lot of fun...but i don't feel the need to do it any more than i have to, to get this degree.

    thank you for any input you can provide.
    alice
  5. by   HOMESICKLPN
    Quote from sickandtired
    Nice to hear you're coming back! Regarding the IVS, and scope of practice, on my unit (medicine), LPNs hang and maintain any periph IV that doesn't have a med in it. Can't initiate IVs though, look after acute unstable patients, or do complex wound care. They are supposed to be phoning for doctor's orders shortly, though, something they have not been doing up to this point.

    BUT, it varies from unit to unit and hospital to hospital. In my same hospital in ER and surgery LPNs do not give out meds! But work at full scope in ECU and subacute! More and more hospitals are going to full scope though, or they will not be able to keep their LPNs after 2007. Most LPNs do not want to work with a restriction on their lisence after that date.

    it would be interesting to hear what the "scope of practice" is for LPNs in other provinces. :wink2:

    in my current job i do everything but deep suctioning....i talk to doctors, take and process orders, mediactions includingprns, process lab work, deal with families, do care conferences, admitting all interventions (catheters ect), i do all dressings, including complex ones, assessments, im, and sub q (and clysis) injections including insulin and narcotics. i don't think it's fair at all, the rn is supposed to be in charge and help me if i need it.
    we have rn floors and lpn floors. rn's have their own unit on a different floor and are usually busy. most of them don't know our the residents, are casual, or leave too much of the decisions to us (ie. residents in potentially critical condition (vs outside of norms..."to report to rn" per text book) and discerning when to call the doc or send pt's to hospital) not all facillities are like this but it always depends on who you are working with.

    i never wanted to have this much responsibility, if i did i would be an rn, the responsibility is not worth the wage at all...i used to think this was the way it had to be (everyhere) and i had no choices...but i was wrong..i have taken a float position (where i am not incharge) so i can work enough to keep my benefits and look for new work...so far it's good. i think i might go back into grouphome work...i love geriatrics..but i hate how the healthcare system expects us to operate extended care...nuff ranting
    :blushkiss thx for responding april
  6. by   pugmum
    Quote from HOMESICKLPN
    in my current job i do everything but deep suctioning....i talk to doctors, take and process orders, mediactions includingprns, process lab work, deal with families, do care conferences, admitting all interventions (catheters ect), i do all dressings, including complex ones, assessments, im, and sub q (and clysis) injections including insulin and narcotics. i don't think it's fair at all, the rn is supposed to be in charge and help me if i need it.
    we have rn floors and lpn floors. rn's have their own unit on a different floor and are usually busy. most of them don't know our the residents, are casual, or leave too much of the decisions to us (ie. residents in potentially critical condition (vs outside of norms..."to report to rn" per text book) and discerning when to call the doc or send pt's to hospital) not all facillities are like this but it always depends on who you are working with.

    i never wanted to have this much responsibility, if i did i would be an rn, the responsibility is not worth the wage at all...i used to think this was the way it had to be (everyhere) and i had no choices...but i was wrong..i have taken a float position (where i am not incharge) so i can work enough to keep my benefits and look for new work...so far it's good. i think i might go back into grouphome work...i love geriatrics..but i hate how the healthcare system expects us to operate extended care...nuff ranting
    :blushkiss thx for responding april
    Amazing how things differ from place to place...good luck in your float job and your new work search! :wink2:

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