Does nursing institution matter for B.C.?

  1. I was wondering for those of you who are nursing students or was a student/and working now, do you find based on new nursing grads, the quality of of the nurses coming out of the school matter according to which nursing program/institution they were in? (ie. UBC, Kwantlen University-college, Douglas college, Langara, UVIC, BCIT, etc.)? For example, I have heard that those graduating from UBC definately have the knowledge, but lack the pratical skills as they only start on the clinical side of things in 3 year, where as other schools such as Kwantlen/BCIT/etc begin clinicals either 1st/2nd semester.

    Does the hospitals who hire new grads look at which school a nurse went to when hiring?

    Btw, which areas in the hospital do most nursing grads end up working in right after graduation? (females and males)?

    How soon do most new grads usually take before actually getting jobs straight out of their program?

    Do male nurses tend to be positioned or hired in different areas of nursing compared to female nurses?

    Thanks for the feedback.
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   fergus51
    I don't think it matters.

    Most new grads go onto med-surg floors (same for boys and girls). Some start the day after they graduate, others take some time to rest. The real problem is it's hard to get a full time job as a new nurse.
  4. by   artofwar
    Yup, I am aware from speaking to some nurses that most new grads end up being casual floaters. In general I suppose they get the 7pm-7am /grave yeard shifts more often than the day shifts? In general is it a matter of getting the work hours in (to gain experience?) before one gets a chance at a full time position? How many work hours do most new grads need to work before being considered for a full time positions? As far as casual work goes, how many hours of work per week do they end up with on average? I suppose most new grads float between hospitals as well?

    Is there any real advantage to applying for a job in the hospital, while still in the nursing program, perhaps working as a porter or care-aid? Would that give an advantage for future work upon graduation?

    Thanks

    Quote from fergus51
    I don't think it matters.

    Most new grads go onto med-surg floors (same for boys and girls). Some start the day after they graduate, others take some time to rest. The real problem is it's hard to get a full time job as a new nurse.
  5. by   fergus51
    I do think some floors will look favourably on experience there as a porter or care aid.

    The problem with casual is that the orientation is not long and you are never guaranteed hours. Expect to get called 7 days a week in the summer and over Xmas holidays, then once a week in February. Most new grads wind up working casual just because there aren't enough full time positions available. It has nothing to do with needing experience or anything like that. They are often floated between floors (since it's one way to guarantee you get hours), but not between hospitals unless they chose to apply at 2 or more.

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