Should I become an lpn first or just go for ASN? - page 3

by Will-B

7,133 Views | 28 Comments

I live in northen Indiana. My question is, would it be beneficial for me to get my lpn before I get my RN? This way I could be getting some sort of experience while I'm getting my RN. I am ready to start a program fall 2011. All... Read More


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    Sorry guys, I have to disagree on a lot of things said here. Let me say first that I have a BSN ~ reason being I already had a prior BS degree and the time spent for the BSN would have been the same for the ADN. I am a DON and hire brand new LPN grads all of the time (just hired one about three weeks ago). In their training they get a lot more hands on clinical time than the BSN does and in SNFs can do anything the RNs do with the exception of IVs and even then they can do IVs if they get certified. The LPN gets paid less but DOES their pay sucki? Not really, if you are presently making $8 - $10 an hour and you start at $15 - $17 an hour you just got a $5 to $7 an hour raise and that improves a LOT of peoples living conditions. Most places will pay for you to go from LPN to ADN and it's cheaper than paying for a BSN. Please don't tell me they are beginning to say that you "have" to have a BSN to even be looked at anymore because they were saying that when I went to school years ago ~ not true. BSN is great, especiallly if you want to be a DON or higher supervisory work but you can only have so many supervisors. If, like many people, you need to have that extra money while you are in school for your ADN then get the LPN and have the option of working three different shifts while you go to school to finish up. You will then have experience under your belt and more hireable. In either case, good luck to you ~ it's really a personal choice.
    Julie19 and PatMac10,RN like this.
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    Quote from gemimi
    Sorry guys, I have to disagree on a lot of things said here. Let me say first that I have a BSN ~ reason being I already had a prior BS degree and the time spent for the BSN would have been the same for the ADN. I am a DON and hire brand new LPN grads all of the time (just hired one about three weeks ago). In their training they get a lot more hands on clinical time than the BSN does and in SNFs can do anything the RNs do with the exception of IVs and even then they can do IVs if they get certified. The LPN gets paid less but DOES their pay sucki? Not really, if you are presently making $8 - $10 an hour and you start at $15 - $17 an hour you just got a $5 to $7 an hour raise and that improves a LOT of peoples living conditions. Most places will pay for you to go from LPN to ADN and it's cheaper than paying for a BSN. Please don't tell me they are beginning to say that you "have" to have a BSN to even be looked at anymore because they were saying that when I went to school years ago ~ not true. BSN is great, especially if you want to be a DON or higher supervisory work but you can only have so many supervisors. If, like many people, you need to have that extra money while you are in school for your ADN then get the LPN and have the option of working three different shifts while you go to school to finish up. You will then have experience under your belt and more hireable. In either case, good luck to you ~ it's really a personal choice.
    I agree with you. I think BSN is a good thing, but you know everyone can't tackle that first nor do some wish to. Also people do seem to think that LPNs can't get jobs, when in fact they can. There is always a need for and office LPN or LTC LPN around here, and in some places in the next state over they hire LPNs at hospitals because they practice "team nursing " I think it is where there are only a few RNs and the rest of the nursing staff on a floor are LPNs, because it's apparently cheaper than paying a whole floor of RNs. I personally chose the ADN (Associates degree in Nursing) route as well. I had the opportunity to pursue a BSN, but chose not to. I simply didn't and still don't want to have to wait 4 years to become a registered nurse. I do however plan to enter a RN to BSN or MSN program immediately after I get my ADN that way I don't get discouraged from waiting a long time to return to school. It is true that most facilities are encouraging and preferring BSN prepared nurses (which isn't a bad thing, but places around here will not simply refuse an ADN nurse a job because they want a BSN nurse. When about 60% of the registered nursing population is ADN prepared (What's All the Fuss?), they take those with experience first and that sometimes mean hiring an experienced ADN nurse over a BSN nurse who been practicing for a year or less.

    Most places around here know that most can't afford to go straight BSN, so they hire ADNs and employers or the government helps them pay to go back to school to get their BSN. Many of the nurses at the hospital I work were ADN nurses and in the course of 9 to 13 months later the majority of them are now BSN nurses for doing Grand Canyon University or similar RN t BSN programs.

    Sorry, kind of got off track. My point is, it doesn't matter what entry level of nursing you decide to take, you know your situation better than all of us. Remember what ever you decide, if you make it through a program and pass the NCLEX-PN or RN, whether it be an LPN, ADN, or BSN program you will be a nurse, which is something you weren't before.
    Julie19 likes this.
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    Thank you all for your responses! They are all very valued. I know that in this time, things have changed a bit. I really want to be a nurse and since I have all my paperwork into the ADN program that I plan to go to, I will wait to see if I get accepted. I will find out in the middle of February. If I can't get in there, I will re-evaluate. Thanks!
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    The only other thing to consider is applying to both, that's what I did. The ADN program is insanely competitive at my community college they get about 200 apps for 42 spots. I was on #15 on the alternate list for the ADN they ended up taking up to #11. So I'm glad I applied to the LPN as well it is first come first served I applied Sept.09 for the Sept.10 program and got in otherwise I would have had to put school off another year. Maybe not a big deal if you're 19 or 20, but starting over at 33 every year counts to me.
    PatMac10,RN likes this.
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    Go for your BSN!!!! Start with your ADN BUT continue with school. We need BSNs and MSNs. We need nursing instructers and advance practitioners.
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    just get your bsn.
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    My plan is to be an NP. So I will definitely be getting my BSN.
    PatMac10,RN likes this.
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    i think you have to look at several factors. I am in TX, so it may be different here. I choose the LVN route because it can be done in 11 months (fulltime student). Here, there are crazy waiting lists to get into RN programs. LTC is EASY to find a job at as an LVN. RN's are finding a tough time getting a job, though it can be done. Here, hospitals rarely hire LVN's so if you were set on working in a hospital then LVN would not be a good idea. ADN will take twice as long, though so many more doors will be open as an RN. Try to get a part time job as a CNA/PCT when in school if possible because that makes it a million times easier to get a job at the facility.
    PatMac10,RN likes this.
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    I got my LPN first for several reasons. One was there was no RN program of any kind available to me when I decided to become a nurse. Another was I was 50 years old when I entered college to become a nurse. I was not sure I was smart enough or would be able to keep up with the younger students. I found out I was both smart enough and even got better grades than some of the younger students! I immediately transitioned to an ADN/RN program but had to move to another city to do it. I left my husband behind for 2 years but it has turned out to be worth it. The training and knowledge I received in LPN training was invaluable to me in my RN classes - the material was so much easier for me to understand. I love being a nurse! I am now thinking about going back to get my BSN just for the heck of it! You have to do what you feel is best for you. If you are just now trying to get into a program and you have both programs available to you, I would agree you should apply to both programs and let God open the door He wants you to walk through. He knows you better than you do so trust Him! Good luck to you. I will be praying for your success and happiness in your nursing career.


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