A Comforting Analogy - page 2

by GinaDecorRN

3,150 Unique Views | 12 Comments

I don't force my faith on anyone, and would only share this if I felt it was appropriate with clients that may have talked openly about their belief in heaven and faith. Sunday mornings were always challenging when my son... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from Tragically Hip
    For the admins: Shouldn't this thread be in the General Nursing > Nursing and Spirituality group rather than the Hospice Nursing group?

    It gets a bit slippery when a provider on whom a patient depends expresses his personal feelings about politics/spirituality/football teams. The patient is left to wonder that, should he express disagreement with his caregiver, that his care might suffer.

    I'd leave the spirital counseling to the pros, just as I'd hope the clergy would leave pain management to the medical staff.
    Because of the nature and design of the hospice model, nurses are often involved in meeting the spiritual needs of the patient.

    It is true that health professionals can create a dangerous environment for patients if the dialog becomes more focused on the beliefs of the professional rather than on the beliefs of the patient. This is why an excellent understanding and implementation of professional boundaries is so crucial to our work.
    GinaDecorRN likes this.
  2. 0
    Quote from tewdles
    Because of the nature and design of the hospice model, nurses are often involved in meeting the spiritual needs of the patient.
    Where in a nurse's training is "meeting the spiritual needs of the patient" covered? Is there a certification for it?

    Quote from tewdles
    It is true that health professionals can create a dangerous environment for patients if the dialog becomes more focused on the beliefs of the professional rather than on the beliefs of the patient. This is why an excellent understanding and implementation of professional boundaries is so crucial to our work.
    Indeed.
  3. 2
    tragically hip "where in a nurse's training is "meeting the spiritual needs of the patient" covered? is there a certification for it?"
    from the university of texas arlington school of nursing catalog :
    nurs 3362. spiritual care in nursing (3-0) 3 hours credit.
    students will explore the aspects of spiritual care including the meaning of spirituality, assessment of spiritual well-being, diagnosis of spiritual needs, delivery of spiritual care, and evaluation of intervention effectiveness. transcultural views of spirituality will be discussed along with ethical implications of spiritual care in nursing. prerequisite:nurs 2240, 3420, 2365, 2366, 3532 or registered nurse students.
    nurs 3356. nursing care at the end of life (3-0) 3 hours credit. an overview of the nursing care of the terminally ill patient and family. explores the impact of personal values and beliefs about death on nursing care, the physiology of end stage disease processes, clinical approaches to pain and symptom management, societal issues and trends in end of life care and models of care delivery. prerequisite:bsn students must complete all required junior ii courses, or registered nurse students.
    nurs 3425. holistic health assessment (3-3) 4 hours credit. theory and practice of holistic health assessment of individuals and families across the life span with emphasis on normal findings. registered nurse students only. prerequisite: nurs 3342 or 3442. *

    many nursing courses consider the whole patient under the description of holistic nursing. body, mind and spirit. we are not mechanics taking care of the broken parts of a body but caring for the whole patient in their situation which is where family nursing comes in. the multi-faceted dynamics we deal with as nurses makes our work both challenging and rewarding. this is done as professionals maintaining boundaries to protect our patients and ourselves.
    if you have ever held a patients hand, that is holistic nursing, if you haven't then you are missing out.


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