Island Fever Island Fever - pg.2 | allnurses

Island Fever - page 2

Anyone else wanna comment on island fever? Wanna share your thoughts, perspective, etc? - Lisa ;-) For those of you on the mainland, who are thinking about moving here, here's a post for... Read More

  1. Visit  Lisa From Maui profile page
    0
    Dear Okie ICU,
    I am gonna answer a question about bringing your dogs. I like things to be organized, so instead of adding the cost of dogs to this thread, I'm gonna start a new thread. -- Lisa ;-)
  2. Visit  WindwardOahuRN profile page
    1
    >>3) oh...and if you do manage to snag a job, guess what happens if census drops? you're the first to be cut. you stay home. no pto accrued, no pay, period. i've seen ft nurses work as little as one day per two week pay period in times of low census. i've also seen newcomers head back home after an extended period of low census, unable to survive here.
    just for clarification.....why would i be the first one cancelled? if i were full time staff and the census drops, do they not take turns amongst the nurses on staff or on that unit?<<

    simply because you were the last one hired. we don't take turns and according to the union contract we don't have to. full-time? i answer, with all due respect, so what? we're pretty much all full-timers. seniority brings with it privilege. fair? well, the old-timers have worked long and hard and up until the last seven years or so the conditions for nurses here were pretty darn crappy. we went through a strike that lasted seven weeks and saw a lot of gains by doing so but we paid a huge price, both financially and in the overall morale at the workplace. so they (we, maybe?) have bought ourselves some rights that newcomers have to earn. like it or not, that's the way it is. so no, we don't take turns.
    if you are looking for the hvcb version of aloha here you're in for a rude awakening. an awful lot of window-dressing and what i fondly refer to as faux-loha here, much to the shock and chagrin of some fob'ers. ask yourself (and answer honestly): would you give up a shift's worth of pay or pto (in my case, equal to about $600) to help someone who most likely will be outta here in less than two years? why?


    >>for instance, i find that many apartments to rent state that they are furnished. i have read conflicting information on bringing furniture from the mainland, buying it here, or it coming with ones apartment or condo.<<

    "furnished" does not mean necessarily mean furnished. welcome to the parallel universe that we call hawaii. "furnished" in hawaii rental lingo means that it has, at the very least, appliances. you have to ask.

    i really can't address your other questions. i've got a touch of vertigo from shaking my head and i'm about to settle into an evening of cabernet sauvignon and desperate housewives.

    one last note (for now): there are many many resources on the internet for people who want to move here. i'm sure that you can access them with a google.com search and if you are like most people thinking about moving here you already have. most people who already live here are pretty tired of arguing the (to them/us) obvious and just go with the "well if you want to do it just do it" advice. yes, people do live here, successfully. like anything else in life it's a trade-off. asking the cost of milk/electricity/gas is just, to me, a rather silly attempt to collect facts that mean nothing in the long run. they are the essentials of modern life and they have to be paid for, whatever else is sacrificed, if you are to survive. any decent rn job will afford you the capability of living a lifestyle that is quite a bit above tenting it on the beach. you will be able to afford utilities, gas, and yes, milk.

    aloha---i'm off to immerse myself in the high drama of the housewives of fairview. :d

    (excuse any typos/grammatical slips---i'm in no mood to proofread)
    Lisa From Maui likes this.
  3. Visit  Lisa From Maui profile page
    0
    Windward, you wrote, "I've got a touch of vertigo from shaking my head."
    I'm laughing out loud!!! Thanks for the laughter. Enjoy your rest. -- Lisa ;-)
  4. Visit  elppaym profile page
    2
    Aloha All!

    I would have to say I'm blessed to have been able to experience both worlds, Living in Hawaii and Vacationing in Hawaii!

    I'm Native Hawaiian and have a huge Ohana (family) in Hawaii. Kama'aina for those of you that have lived there or have friends there, are rates that our different than that tourists pay...it can be from local stores to hotel chains to tickets for events. So that's a plus...Kinda like being in Chicago and showing your I.D. to get discount rate into the Shed or Museum of Art, etc.

    For me and my family, my wife and I are both RN's, moving back to Hawaii would be something we talk about quite often in the past. The reality is we have a better quality of living staying here on the mainland than moving to Hawaii...It would be better for us to buy a condo in Honolulu and vacation than move...but that is our opinion, our situation.

    I have family that work in a variety of fields in Hawaii, it's just plain expensive...but that can be held true of anywhere...depending on the job market.

    I will say this...there is definitely a difference from living in Hawaii and Vacationing in Hawaii...

    for further research look at this link and talk to some locals, http://www.city-data.com/forum/hawaii/

    As for traffic, like any other city, its a mad house during rush hour...period!

    As for me, I've been back there 3 times to live, and every time I moved back to the mainland...maybe when we're older and the kids are grown up, but till then just to many opportunities on the mainland to compare...
    Lisa From Maui and OkieICU_RN like this.
  5. Visit  WindwardOahuRN profile page
    0
    elppaym wrote:

    >>I'm Native Hawaiian and have a huge Ohana (family) in Hawaii. Kama'aina for those of you that have lived there or have friends there, are rates that our different than that tourists pay...it can be from local stores to hotel chains to tickets for events.<<

    Kama'aina rates are nice but honestly, in the last ten years, I've rarely had the opportunity to use them except for tourist-oriented events and venues.
    When taking guests to the zoo, going to museums, etc, yes, we do usuallly get some kind of discount.
    But for everyday stuff and events there is usually no special kama'aina discount.
    When I see HECO giving a kama'aina discount I'll get excited.
  6. Visit  koi310 profile page
    1
    It is very difficult to "make it" in Hawaii without a support network. If you are an outsider without contacts, friends, or family to help you out, you probably won't last beyond a couple of years here, as WindwardRN stated. Those who lack the aforementioned support networks but DO survive here posses the following characteristics: resilience, independence, cultural tolerance, emotional and cognitive flexibility, and an ability to make friends quickly. Oh, and tremendous motivation to make a life here--as if the captain burned the ships after making landfall on an explored continent-type of motivation. Most people don't have these qualities.
    Lisa From Maui likes this.
  7. Visit  dreamon profile page
    1
    Wow, WindWardRN definitely put it into perspective to me than no one before.
    If no one else was absorbing the advice you were giving, I CERTAINLY did!

    My Hawaii fantasy was a long shot, but I know now that the only thing I will be doing there is vacationing or perhaps doing a military PCS at the most.
    Lisa From Maui likes this.
  8. Visit  OkieICU_RN profile page
    0
    Quote from elppaym
    Aloha All!

    I would have to say I'm blessed to have been able to experience both worlds, Living in Hawaii and Vacationing in Hawaii!

    I'm Native Hawaiian and have a huge Ohana (family) in Hawaii. Kama'aina for those of you that have lived there or have friends there, are rates that our different than that tourists pay...it can be from local stores to hotel chains to tickets for events. So that's a plus...Kinda like being in Chicago and showing your I.D. to get discount rate into the Shed or Museum of Art, etc.

    For me and my family, my wife and I are both RN's, moving back to Hawaii would be something we talk about quite often in the past. The reality is we have a better quality of living staying here on the mainland than moving to Hawaii...It would be better for us to buy a condo in Honolulu and vacation than move...but that is our opinion, our situation.

    I have family that work in a variety of fields in Hawaii, it's just plain expensive...but that can be held true of anywhere...depending on the job market.

    I will say this...there is definitely a difference from living in Hawaii and Vacationing in Hawaii...

    for further research look at this link and talk to some locals, http://www.city-data.com/forum/hawaii/

    As for traffic, like any other city, its a mad house during rush hour...period!

    As for me, I've been back there 3 times to live, and every time I moved back to the mainland...maybe when we're older and the kids are grown up, but till then just to many opportunities on the mainland to compare...

    Elppaym....

    Thank you so much for your post. The link you gave is the best resource I have seen despite my hundreds of googling attempts to find something like that. After reading some posts over there for the past hour, I can tell that Aloha is alive and well.

    Again, thanks for sharing the info....it will come in handy during the planning and decision making stages.
  9. Visit  Lisa From Maui profile page
    0
    Dear Dreamon:
    I'm glad you're listening. Glad one person is.

    Please, come to Hawai'i. Vacation here. Have the time of your life. You will love it! Stay living on the mainland, get a good paying job, manage your money right, and you'll have money left over. Come back to Hawai'i every year to vacation. That's smart, realistic, and do-able.


    We live in a 900 sq ft condo. Put another way, imagine a box that's 30 feet x 30 feet. That's 900 sq ft. Our condo has 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, a kitchen, dining area, living room. Can you visualize how small that is? We are on the 2nd floor. Rent is $1300 per month. I don't know about you, but to me, that's an outrageous amount of money to pay for rent for such a small place. And I'm thrilled that we are living here; we lucked out when we found a landlord that will take my dog.

    Many people could write that there are many places to live on Maui for far less money. And that's true. I know a lady who lives in a studio apartment, for only $600 a month. She has no air conditioning. When it's 81-85 degrees, with 50-75% humidity, 6 months out of the year, she has no A/C. Plus, her neighbors are LOUD! But it's not so bad. She works two jobs, 60 hours a week, and she's only home to shower between jobs & to sleep at night.

    Windward writes that it's a trade off. I agree with her, 100%. Sure, we could find a lower priced place to live, for less money, but would I want to? Heavens, no! So, we spend an outrageous amount of money to get a place that I like.

    Wages here are so low... and everything costs so much! After you pay for your car, insurance, gas ($3.65/gallon last time I checked), maintenance, repairs, rent, electric, food, clothes, anything health-related, K-mart / Wal-mart, etc. You have very little money left. After you pay your BASIC BILLS, there's very little money left to do anything fun.

    When you're here on vacation, you know you're gonna spend lots of money to go out and have fun. It's paradise! You can afford it because it's only for 1-2 weeks. Living here is a different story. Someone tell me... when you are just scraping by, just able to pay your basic bills, how is that fun? How is that paradise?

    I hope someone else is listening.
  10. Visit  WindwardOahuRN profile page
    1
    One bit of advice here. For all those thinking about moving to Hawaii I suggest you spring for a subscription to a local newspaper. The Sunday edition is enough. It will be delivered by mail to your mainland home complete with advertisements and you can read all about what is actually going on in the Islands. I had a subsciption to the Sunday editiion of the Honolulu Advertiser for a year before I moved here. The good and the bad, the classifieds, the letters to the editor.

    http://www.honoluluadvertiser.com/

    Message boards are not the best source of basic information anyway. The posts are invariably colored by the posters' personal experiences and opinions and, IME, most people coming here can find basic info (price of gas/milk/housing/etc) somewhere else on the internet and they just want reassurance that they're going to be just fine if they come here. Sure, they ask about "good neighborhoods" and that's okay but then...they go on to dispute what residents say, citing something they read somewhere.
    Maybe they'll be fine, maybe they'll crash and burn. The people who bomb out here and have less-than-wonderful experiences generally don't post on message boards and if they do they're roundly accused of "lacking aloha" by people who come to Hawaii on vacation and who are, with few exceptions and with all due respect, majorly clueless about life here, especially if they have even the slightest propensity for magical thinking or self-delusion. Yes, no matter how many times they've come here.
    And if I hear one more mainlander admonishing others for "lack of aloha" I think I'll just bury my head in a bowl of haupia and scream. Haupia is a wonderful scream muffler. Just remember to lift your head when taking a breath between screams.
    Would you like a list of links to sites with information about living in Hawaii, uncolored by message board angst?

    Here ya go:

    http://www.queensmedicalcenter.net/i...=66&Itemid=141
    Last edit by WindwardOahuRN on Nov 10, '09
    Lisa From Maui likes this.
  11. Visit  WindwardOahuRN profile page
    2
    Another resource site---a few years old so the info might be a bit dated:

    http://ssl.honoluluadvertiser.com/li...paradise/2007/
    OkieICU_RN and Lisa From Maui like this.
  12. Visit  Lisa From Maui profile page
    2
    dh = dear husband pto = paid time off fob = fresh off the boat
    heco = hawai'i electric company, your electric bill hvcb = ??? military pcs = ???


    okie wrote: "after reading some posts over there (at other websites) for the past hour, i can tell that aloha is alive and well."

    okie, you and i have very different outlooks. i've lived here for 11 months. for me, allnurses.com (an) posts have been filled with aloha! they tell it like it is. i've sent private messages to some an posters, and i've talked on the phone to some an posters. they help me to realize that i'm not a failure. hawai'i is in the absolute toughest economy it's had in 20 years. they help me to realize that it's not about me being screwed up, it's not about what i'm doing wrong. hard times, closed doors, rejection... it's happening everywhere, to everyone.


    koi wrote: "those who do survive here posses the following characteristics... tremendous motivation to make a life here--as if the captain burned the ships after making landfall."

    okie, there is a big difference between moving... mainland to mainland vs mainland to islands. my husband and i spent years furnishing our house. if we moved to another mainland state, we could have loaded up a huge uhaul van & driven it across the country. my husband is used to driving huge tractor-trailers, so he would have been comfortable driving it.

    moving to hawai'i is different. we looked at shipping prices, and realized it would have cost us just as much $$ to ship furniture as it would cost to buy new stuff here. when we moved here, he gave a closet full of important stuff to a friend of his, for storage. we loaded up one pallet of stuff, 4 ft x 4 ft x 6 ft tall, and shipped it to maui, for about $1100. we brought four suitcases of stuff. we had a 4 bedroom house, and we sold everything else we had. everything we had built up for five years was torn apart in three months. that was really really hard.

    six months after we got here, we were walking through a furniture store. i walked up to one particular table, i kept quiet, but tears started streaming down my face. my husband asked me what was wrong. i whispered to him, "we had that table back home." i thought of all the conversations i had with my girlfriends, sitting at that table. and then i thought of all the other things in our house, and all the memories those things were connected to. the tears wouldn't stop.

    as women, we get emotionally attached to our homes, much the same way men get emotionally attached to the classic car or watch or tool set their dad gave them. it's not just about the financial cost of things. it's about the psychological/ emotional cost as well. i do think it would be easier if we had our old furniture here. our condo would have felt less foreign, would have felt more like home.

    going back to the idea of aloha... when i read, "the captain burned the ships," i felt aloha. koi may not have been trying to give me empathy, but he (she?) did. koi knows where i am coming from. the ship had burned. i had never put it into those words, but koi hit the nail on the head. i have no other choice. i have to make it here. reading about resilience, independence, cultural tolerance, emotional and cognitive flexibility helps to remind me that moving here brings with it a huge learning curve. it takes it's toll on a person. in the last 11 months, i've heard many locals talk about the "first year initiation." it's kind of like what winward wrote. it's about paying your dues. like what koi wrote. it's about survival.


    okie, it may not seem like aloha to you. it's definitely aloha to me.

    all in all, the 20-30 other island nurses who post here have helped me realize that it may be year 2015 before the economy turns around and i can get a job as a new grad. they have been very clear with that. i took all that information and made a decision. i have no idea why my husband was given his job here. i don't know why the universe (spirit, higher power, alpha-omega, creator, the source) dropped a job in his lap, and moved us here. but, while i'm here, i'm going to make the best of it, and get my bachelor's if science in nursing (bsn) done. if the economy still hasn't turned around by then, i'll go for my masters.

    the people here have given me information, given me clarity, given me real answers, honest answers.
    in my opinion, from my perspective, that's not just kokua. that's aloha.
    mcubed45 and WindwardOahuRN like this.
  13. Visit  OkieICU_RN profile page
    1
    WindwardOahuRN: That was great advice about getting a subscription to the Honolulu newspaper. I had previously read the links from the Queen's website, and I do think it is a great resource for people to be aware of.

    I do, sort of, understand what you are saying about the message boards. I really do like the message board (Citydata) for breaking down the communities and a top 10 tips list for moving to Hawaii. There are many posts about the downside of moving to and/or living in Hawaii on the message boards too, some of which I didn't know I needed to consider. To me, it's real experiences of people who have been able to be successful in their moves to Hawaii and others who weren't as successful and gave insight into why they weren't.

    In reality, you, more than anyone else, who has been as active on the boards, are a success story (I am NOT slamming anyone else by saying this!). That was as good a reason as any for me to try and glean insight from you into how someone else might be successful in moving too. I wanted to learn from you.

    All I was trying to say about the "aloha" is that I specifically sought information here, on allnurses, because I thought some level of rapport was already there with us all being nurses. My perceptions of the word "aloha" are simply: being helpful to one's fellow human (or nurse for the purposes of this board) and sharing of information bad AND good. It just felt, to me, like information was mostly bad and rarely good. The past few posts have provided valuable resources and information and I really am truly grateful for the information.

    Lisa: I am glad to have seen your candor about the trials and tribulations in moving to Hawaii . It was a very moving story about you seeing YOUR furniture in the store and realizing those memories that were attached to your belongings. That is something I could have never envisioned or considered without you telling that story. It was meaningful.

    Best of luck to you in pursuing your BSN and I hope that the upswing in the economy will happen sooner, rather than later. I wish you the greatest success in finding a nursing position and continuing with your educational goals.

    I apologize if I have offended anyone here, it truly was not my intention.
    Lisa From Maui likes this.

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