Island Fever - page 2

by Lisa From Maui 11,382 Views | 58 Comments

Anyone else wanna comment on island fever? Wanna share your thoughts, perspective, etc? - Lisa ;-) For those of you on the mainland, who are thinking about moving here, here's a post for you! We live on the island... Read More


  1. 1
    Lisa, Mahalo for your response. I appreciate your aloha spirit in mocking my post.

    Since we are in the same age range, I'm certain you can understand that I haven't stayed in a Motel 6 in many, many years either. Unlike you, I have never had the adventure of staying in a hostel though in my younger days it probably would have been fun to backpack around the US, Europe, etc. staying in hostels. As I was writing my previous post, it was in jest that I suggested ways to find cheaper ways to vacation. I just happen to have a knack for it and I help friends and family find things that they couldn't find on their own. I well understand your frustration with having to pay a high price for travel to go anywhere. It's just one of those prices one plans for and pays when living here. Certainly you can imagine that living smackdab in the middle of the continental US requires significant travel to get to any beach, so I can sympathize with you in some respects.

    After having researched many things involved in moving to Oahu, I know I can bring my dogs. It's just a matter of whether we will since they will have to live in a condo or small house and become confined a lot more than they are now running free in the backyard. I too have checked out the cost of obtaining the vaccines and tests required to bring them here and avoid quarantine altogether or only the 5 day period. Your vet where you are from must be far more expensive than mine because it was around $300 per dog to get everything done. I'm sure if my dogs had a flea issue and it became a household issue, it would likely cost the amount you quoted whether I was in Oklahoma or Hawaii.

    I will miss my friends and family no differently than if I lived in Washington state or Washinton D.C. than I would if I were in Hawaii. The cost is only slightly more to come to Honolulu than it is to go to San Francisco or LA, so I would still visit often and they too would visit me because they will not have to pay for a hotel or car.

    I'm sorry to hear you have had such a difficult transition. Many people do whether they move 10 miles or 3000 miles. Certainly it is important to be happy with oneself and not rely on external gratification. Hawaii isn't going to bring me or anyone else happiness. It's just that people like to be different places. Some people want to live in Florida, others in New York City, still others in Alaska. It just so happens that I would like to live here, in Hawaii.

    I'm sure I will be waiting indefinitely for a helpful reply.
    LetUrLightShineRN likes this.
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    OkieICURN wrote:

    >>I'm sure I will be waiting indefinitely for a helpful reply.<<

    So just what is your question?
    I'm not all that sure you're headed here anyway, seeing as just a few weeks or so ago you posted that "you really want to move" to Seattle (??).
    Fantasies are nice but reality is a kick in the butt.
    Anyway---here are some issues to ponder:
    1) Extreme difficulty finding a place that will rent to someone who has dogs.
    2) Extreme difficulty in finding a job---you've apparently got some experience but so do many many MANY unemployed nurses here. And yes, facilities DO count residential stability (read: local, long-time resident, even military spouse, not FOB) as a big factor when hiring.
    3) Oh...and if you do manage to snag a job, guess what happens if census drops? You're the first to be cut. You stay home. No PTO accrued, no pay, period. I've seen FT nurses work as little as one day per two week pay period in times of low census. I've also seen newcomers head back home after an extended period of low census, unable to survive here.
    4) The average stay for PROFESSIONAL people who are transplants to Hawaii (not beach bums or trust fund babies) is two years. The bloom is off the rose and the honeymoon is over by then. Step into the revolving door that is life in Hawaii. Aloha, baby.
    5) Things undoubtedly work out better if you bring a fair amount of cash as a buffer during lean times. Excellent credit rating is a plus, too, when apartment hunting and, increasingly, when job hunting. I have no idea what your cash flow/credit standing situation is so don't get defensive, just thought I'd toss this in the pot.
    6) Resist the urge to convince yourself that you can put up with anything as long as "WE ARE IN HA-WHY-EEEEEE!!!!" It's at best unrealistic and at worst downright delusional.

    We've been here nearly ten years and doing fine. Please re-read issue #5 above. Just as a point of information we would survive without my income, if need be. DH is retired with a decent pension, cars are paid for, just six years left on a mortgage that's got a monthly payment of not much more than most decent apartments rent for. Kids are grown, we can travel a bit when we want to, my job is secure (YAY UNION). My everyday stress level is pretty low. Nice garden, nice little house (doing renovations ourselves), nice neighbors, good dog.
    We've accepted the trials and tribulations of living here and yes, there are many. They've been discussed at length in this forum. Like clockwork, every few months or so, there will be someone with dreams of moving here that will ARGUE with residents about what it is like to live here. The classic "cost-of-a-gallon-of-milk" presentation gets old. My take on this is that they are actually arguing with themselves, trying to convince THEMSELVES that all these people who live here are wrong and they are right.
    Advice? As always, my advice is come on over and give it a try. The worst that can happen is that you use up all your savings and head back home.

    LisaFromMaui is venting, as many of us who have lived here a while tend to do.
    You're fantasizing, as many who are on vacation tend to do.

    Enjoy your vacation.
    Last edit by WindwardOahuRN on Nov 8, '09
    Lisa From Maui likes this.
  3. 1
    so just what is your question?
    well, my original statement (rather than a specific question) was: i just would like to hear something.....anything.... positive about trying to make a move to hawaii.

    i'm not all that sure you're headed here anyway, seeing as just a few weeks or so ago you posted that "you really want to move" to seattle (??).
    definitely. i'd love to live in seattle. i love it there too and it's so completely different from hawaii. i have never said that i want to move to hawaii next week and stay for the rest of my life. it may be one place, it may be the other, or it could be both! in reality, we're waiting another year or two to become empty nesters and for me to decide on graduate school.

    in asking questions about moving to seattle, many people are happy to tell others about the pitfalls of living in seattle. very high cost of living - comparable to hawaii if living downtown, near puget sound. the rain and gloomy weather almost all the time, etc. and the list goes on. one thing that is different though is that most people will extend further information to not only make an informed decision, but give information on how to make it a success. like: here's the downsides, but it can be done! they are talking about how wonderful seattle is and what it has to offer. i find that extremely rare on this forum.

    1) extreme difficulty finding a place that will rent to someone who has dogs.
    this is very helpful to know. i don't know if i'd want to have a dog(s) if i were going to live in a condo. especially since my dogs are big. really, that is helpful.

    2) extreme difficulty in finding a job---you've apparently got some experience but so do many many many unemployed nurses here. and yes, facilities do count residential stability (read: local, long-time resident, even military spouse, not fob) as a big factor when hiring.
    no military, no family here, etc. i get that. i haven't sought out the assistance of any staffing agencies, travel companies, nurse recruiters or applying to any position since it will be some time yet before we decide "for sure" where and when we want to go. so who knows, maybe things will be better at that point for everyone seeking a nursing position. if not, it is something that will add to our decision.

    3) oh...and if you do manage to snag a job, guess what happens if census drops? you're the first to be cut. you stay home. no pto accrued, no pay, period. i've seen ft nurses work as little as one day per two week pay period in times of low census. i've also seen newcomers head back home after an extended period of low census, unable to survive here.
    just for clarification.....why would i be the first one cancelled? if i were full time staff and the census drops, do they not take turns amongst the nurses on staff or on that unit?

    4) the average stay for professional people who are transplants to hawaii (not beach bums or trust fund babies) is two years. the bloom is off the rose and the honeymoon is over by then. step into the revolving door that is life in hawaii. aloha, baby.
    it may be that way for me and my family too. i have often asked (not here) the question for those moving to hawaii....how long does it take to look at the mountains, the ocean, the views all around and not be awe struck? i realize it will happen.

    5) things undoubtedly work out better if you bring a fair amount of cash as a buffer during lean times. excellent credit rating is a plus, too, when apartment hunting and, increasingly, when job hunting. i have no idea what your cash flow/credit standing situation is so don't get defensive, just thought i'd toss this in the pot.
    excellent points made here. definitely working on that. paying off student loans, socking away money to have "just in case" things don't turn out to be all lilikoi and plumerias. i'll ask more questions about this at the end.

    6) resist the urge to convince yourself that you can put up with anything as long as "we are in ha-why-eeeeee!!!!" it's at best unrealistic and at worst downright delusional.
    agreed.

    we've been here nearly ten years and doing fine. please re-read issue #5 above. just as a point of information we would survive without my income, if need be. dh is retired with a decent pension, cars are paid for, just six years left on a mortgage that's got a monthly payment of not much more than most decent apartments rent for. kids are grown, we can travel a bit when we want to, my job is secure (yay union). my everyday stress level is pretty low. nice garden, nice little house (doing renovations ourselves), nice neighbors, good dog.
    we've accepted the trials and tribulations of living here and yes, there are many. they've been discussed at length in this forum. like clockwork, every few months or so (i see stuff more often that that! ), there will be someone with dreams of moving here that will argue with residents about what it is like to live here. the classic "cost-of-a-gallon-of-milk" presentation gets old.
    i couldn't agree with you more which i why i get so annoyed when people living here always bring up how much the milk, bread and gas costs. i'm not trying to argue, i'm trying to ask for real, information....tell me the truth.....it may be $8.00 in maui, but it simply isn't on oahu because i just paid for the stuff 2 days ago! that is reality.

    my take on this is that they are actually arguing with themselves, trying to convince themselves that all these people who live here are wrong and they are right.
    i really don't think that is true. i think people are trying to understand what other areas are we not seeing that no one else talks about? like i "hear" electricity is very expensive here but i have no idea how much a monthly electric bill would be. same for gas, water/sewage, etc. i hear about how bad traffic is here but i drive here everytime i come and i don't find it all that bad. i realize i don't have such "hard deadlines/timelines" as a vacationer; but those who live here do have to be at work at a certain time and want to get home as quickly as possible just like everywhere else in the world. as a nurse, if you work 12's, do you find traffic to be incredibly difficult to deal with at those hours of the day?

    advice? as always, my advice is come on over and give it a try. the worst that can happen is that you use up all your savings and head back home.
    good advice and true reality.

    lisafrommaui is venting, as many of us who have lived here a while tend to do.
    but damn, if you guys are venting...why not vent to each other, even within the forum? this thread as well as many others are directed towards mainlanders desiring to move here. warning about pitfalls is one thing, but a helping hand might be nice too. for instance, direct people towards resources that you may know of that others do not about making a successful move here. how much money to save up, what will have to be paid once here.

    for instance, i find that many apartments to rent state that they are furnished. i have read conflicting information on bringing furniture from the mainland, buying it here, or it coming with ones apartment or condo.

    i have also read conflicting information about shipping a car. at what point is it reasonable to ship ones own car? in other words, if the car is paid for, money is still owed, if it's only worth $2000 or if given many circumstances it would just be better to sell it and buy one here.

    how much money is enough to have for cushion? i realize this is dependant on a lot of factors, but just thought i'd throw it out there.

    you're fantasizing, as many who are on vacation tend to do.
    that may be, but one day i'm hoping my fantasy becomes reality. trust, i will find the answers i need be it here, or elsewhere.

    enjoy your vacation. [/quote]
    thank you!

    i'm not necessarily asking you or anyone on the hawaii pages to answer my specific or non-specific questions. it would just be helpful if you or others would direct me to resources where questions could be answered. i see now that allnurses is probably not the best place to ask these kinds of questions, but since i'm a nurse asking other nurses, i just thought it would be reasonable to expect some level of commraderie in asking for information. if you wanna answer these questions, that's cool. if not, that's cool too, no big deal.
    LetUrLightShineRN likes this.
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    Dear Okie ICU,
    I am gonna answer a question about bringing your dogs. I like things to be organized, so instead of adding the cost of dogs to this thread, I'm gonna start a new thread. -- Lisa ;-)
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    >>3) oh...and if you do manage to snag a job, guess what happens if census drops? you're the first to be cut. you stay home. no pto accrued, no pay, period. i've seen ft nurses work as little as one day per two week pay period in times of low census. i've also seen newcomers head back home after an extended period of low census, unable to survive here.
    just for clarification.....why would i be the first one cancelled? if i were full time staff and the census drops, do they not take turns amongst the nurses on staff or on that unit?<<

    simply because you were the last one hired. we don't take turns and according to the union contract we don't have to. full-time? i answer, with all due respect, so what? we're pretty much all full-timers. seniority brings with it privilege. fair? well, the old-timers have worked long and hard and up until the last seven years or so the conditions for nurses here were pretty darn crappy. we went through a strike that lasted seven weeks and saw a lot of gains by doing so but we paid a huge price, both financially and in the overall morale at the workplace. so they (we, maybe?) have bought ourselves some rights that newcomers have to earn. like it or not, that's the way it is. so no, we don't take turns.
    if you are looking for the hvcb version of aloha here you're in for a rude awakening. an awful lot of window-dressing and what i fondly refer to as faux-loha here, much to the shock and chagrin of some fob'ers. ask yourself (and answer honestly): would you give up a shift's worth of pay or pto (in my case, equal to about $600) to help someone who most likely will be outta here in less than two years? why?


    >>for instance, i find that many apartments to rent state that they are furnished. i have read conflicting information on bringing furniture from the mainland, buying it here, or it coming with ones apartment or condo.<<

    "furnished" does not mean necessarily mean furnished. welcome to the parallel universe that we call hawaii. "furnished" in hawaii rental lingo means that it has, at the very least, appliances. you have to ask.

    i really can't address your other questions. i've got a touch of vertigo from shaking my head and i'm about to settle into an evening of cabernet sauvignon and desperate housewives.

    one last note (for now): there are many many resources on the internet for people who want to move here. i'm sure that you can access them with a google.com search and if you are like most people thinking about moving here you already have. most people who already live here are pretty tired of arguing the (to them/us) obvious and just go with the "well if you want to do it just do it" advice. yes, people do live here, successfully. like anything else in life it's a trade-off. asking the cost of milk/electricity/gas is just, to me, a rather silly attempt to collect facts that mean nothing in the long run. they are the essentials of modern life and they have to be paid for, whatever else is sacrificed, if you are to survive. any decent rn job will afford you the capability of living a lifestyle that is quite a bit above tenting it on the beach. you will be able to afford utilities, gas, and yes, milk.

    aloha---i'm off to immerse myself in the high drama of the housewives of fairview. :d

    (excuse any typos/grammatical slips---i'm in no mood to proofread)
    Lisa From Maui likes this.
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    Windward, you wrote, "I've got a touch of vertigo from shaking my head."
    I'm laughing out loud!!! Thanks for the laughter. Enjoy your rest. -- Lisa ;-)
  7. 2
    Aloha All!

    I would have to say I'm blessed to have been able to experience both worlds, Living in Hawaii and Vacationing in Hawaii!

    I'm Native Hawaiian and have a huge Ohana (family) in Hawaii. Kama'aina for those of you that have lived there or have friends there, are rates that our different than that tourists pay...it can be from local stores to hotel chains to tickets for events. So that's a plus...Kinda like being in Chicago and showing your I.D. to get discount rate into the Shed or Museum of Art, etc.

    For me and my family, my wife and I are both RN's, moving back to Hawaii would be something we talk about quite often in the past. The reality is we have a better quality of living staying here on the mainland than moving to Hawaii...It would be better for us to buy a condo in Honolulu and vacation than move...but that is our opinion, our situation.

    I have family that work in a variety of fields in Hawaii, it's just plain expensive...but that can be held true of anywhere...depending on the job market.

    I will say this...there is definitely a difference from living in Hawaii and Vacationing in Hawaii...

    for further research look at this link and talk to some locals, http://www.city-data.com/forum/hawaii/

    As for traffic, like any other city, its a mad house during rush hour...period!

    As for me, I've been back there 3 times to live, and every time I moved back to the mainland...maybe when we're older and the kids are grown up, but till then just to many opportunities on the mainland to compare...
    Lisa From Maui and OkieICU_RN like this.
  8. 0
    elppaym wrote:

    >>I'm Native Hawaiian and have a huge Ohana (family) in Hawaii. Kama'aina for those of you that have lived there or have friends there, are rates that our different than that tourists pay...it can be from local stores to hotel chains to tickets for events.<<

    Kama'aina rates are nice but honestly, in the last ten years, I've rarely had the opportunity to use them except for tourist-oriented events and venues.
    When taking guests to the zoo, going to museums, etc, yes, we do usuallly get some kind of discount.
    But for everyday stuff and events there is usually no special kama'aina discount.
    When I see HECO giving a kama'aina discount I'll get excited.
  9. 1
    It is very difficult to "make it" in Hawaii without a support network. If you are an outsider without contacts, friends, or family to help you out, you probably won't last beyond a couple of years here, as WindwardRN stated. Those who lack the aforementioned support networks but DO survive here posses the following characteristics: resilience, independence, cultural tolerance, emotional and cognitive flexibility, and an ability to make friends quickly. Oh, and tremendous motivation to make a life here--as if the captain burned the ships after making landfall on an explored continent-type of motivation. Most people don't have these qualities.
    Lisa From Maui likes this.
  10. 1
    Wow, WindWardRN definitely put it into perspective to me than no one before.
    If no one else was absorbing the advice you were giving, I CERTAINLY did!

    My Hawaii fantasy was a long shot, but I know now that the only thing I will be doing there is vacationing or perhaps doing a military PCS at the most.
    Lisa From Maui likes this.


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