HPU - page 3

by TNTD2011 11,940 Views | 28 Comments

I was just accepted to HPU for either their nursing or pre-nursing program to finish a few pre-reqs before starting the nursing program. Does anyone know how this works or have any recommendations or experience? I want to... Read More


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    Ok HPU has moved away from the credit thing. Entrance is now based on nursing GPA, TEAS test score, I'm sure some other things but it is no longer based on HPU credits. My friend got in with me in 2009 with 6 credits. So the credit thing doesn't matter anymore.

    As for HPU, it is unorganized and can be very painful to handle at times. Some teachers are nut cases and some are amazing. If you choose HPU do your research and ask around about teachers before you decide on classes. I had asked around before I registered each semester and I can honestly say I only had two horrible teachers for my entire time there.

    The nursing course is difficult but you get out what you put in. If you get the good teachers you can do very well. Many offer a lot when it comes to helping students. Others, well it's better to find the nice teacher and ask. During my course I found it to be more of the students responsiblity to learn as much as they wanted. The teachers gave a good building foundation however it was the students responsibility to go back and study and make the connections. However that doesn't mean they wont help you. They just want you to make the effort.

    The school is very expensive and the cost only seems to be going up. However, I am a new HPU grad and just got a position in the ER, and I can honestly say that I was very well prepared for both my NCLEX and my current position as an ER nurse. My graduating class had approximately 120 students and only 1 or 2 failed the NCLEX. When you look at numbers compared to other schools that is an extremely high passing rate.

    I hope I have helped you answer some of your questions. If you have anymore please feel free to ask. I have heard that UH is much better but there program is 3 years regardless. There is no speeding it up. I finished HPU nursing program in a year and half. To me it was well worth the money to get it over with and start working.
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    Simonsmom

    I worked at the trauma center in Hawaii for three years and I can honestly say that due to HPU's theory based learning those students were more prepared to clinically think then any other nursing school student. I say this because being in the ER I had many nursing students from ALL of the schools in Hawaii. Now, granted the other nursing schools had more technical skills, they could not tell me WHY we were doing what we were doing. Nor could they tell me what things I would expect to see if my patient's status were to deteroriate. So all that time in your theory class PAYS off in real practice. I hated getting students from other schools because they couldn't think! Your job as a nurse is to PREVENT things from going bad....correct?!?!?! So why should it be more valuable for you to perform technical skill over being able to think ahead? It shouldn't!!! I can teach you technical skills on the floor what I can't teach you is to critically think!

    Not to be rude but you should be a little more thankful for your school because, while they do have their problems and there isn't one school that doesn't, you are a more well rounded prepaired nurse because you can think ahead. You can take my advise as you want but this is coming from a very experience ER person!
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    JNClems-
    I currently work in the ED at a well respected hospital on the island and I can tell you that many of the HPU grads tell me the same thing. They hated HPU and couldn't wait to get out. I agree and the more entrenched I get into the program the same holds true day in and day out. Professors bail on us at the last minute all the time. I saw one actually last week and she said she left because she couldn't handle the treatment of the students and the staff anymore. The standards are substandard according to the teacher. So I am not ungrateful for getting my BSN, I just wish it would have been a different school now.
  4. 1
    Quote from simonsmom
    JNClems-
    I currently work in the ED at a well respected hospital on the island and I can tell you that many of the HPU grads tell me the same thing. They hated HPU and couldn't wait to get out. I agree and the more entrenched I get into the program the same holds true day in and day out. Professors bail on us at the last minute all the time. I saw one actually last week and she said she left because she couldn't handle the treatment of the students and the staff anymore. The standards are substandard according to the teacher. So I am not ungrateful for getting my BSN, I just wish it would have been a different school now.
    I know it's not much consolation now, but your education really doesn't make that big a difference a couple years down the line. What really matters is what you do after school. I know amazing nurses from ALL the different schools. I also know some not so great nurses from the same schools. Your nursing school experience may give you a few advantages/disadvantages when you hit the floor as a new grad, but that begins to matter very little as you continue your career. How much you continue to push yourself and learn independently is what will determines how far you will go. I know it seems like a huge deal now, but do what you have to to get through the bane that is nursing school.
    sdp19 likes this.
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    Hawaii Pacific University School of Nursing is a cash cow for the University. Many of the students who attend HPU was denied admission to UH or KCC and will pay the $$ to get their BSN. On the other hand, without HPU, the State of Hawaii would be really short of RNs. I guess its a win-win situation for HPU and Hawaii.
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    All nursing programs will be expensive unless you got to a community college to get your ADN. It's graduate school for majority of accelerated nursing programs and even traditional nursing programs once you start the nursing classes. Its technically grad school. Medical school and PA school are just as expensive.
  7. 0
    Hi everyone. I am an HPU nursing student. I have heard all the bad talk about HPU. I am here to explain things. The school no longer requires you to take 2 years of pre-req classes before entering the nursing program. I came from a community college here in Hawaii and only needed to take a couple more classes before getting in. Second, NOT EVERYONE GETS INTO HPU'S NURSING PROGRAM. There are more than 300 students that apply. Only 100 or less students get in. It's definitely easier to get into compared to UH since UH only accepts 50-60 students. HPU has changed the C grade thing. Students usually need a C or 70% to advance to the next level. But HPU has made it a rule that students have to pass with a 73% or higher to excel. The professors are great and helpful. When it comes to the cost, many of my classmates have financial aid. People think that only the dumb, rich kids get into HPU but that's not true. I've taken nursing classes at UH Manoa before. So I know how it looks like. HPU is filled with many intelligent people, and some of them have to work, or get financial aid and student loans to make it. I can tell you that it's worth it... I know people in Manoa' nursing program and they have told me that the teachers aren't so pleasant and that the nursing program is all about politics and teachers not listening to students complaints. No school is perfect.
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    Oh , and one more thing. More than 50% of nursing students that are in HPU are from the mainland or different places. I know of some students that went to HPU because they couldn't get into UH Manoa. But not all. The students that came from the mainland and other places chose HPU because they wated to, not because they were forced to.
  9. 0
    Just wanted to add my two cents. I had a great experience at HPU. Growing up on the windward side of Oahu made going to HPU, ideal. I did transfer after completing two years at UH-Hilo. It took me two semesters to get caught up with per-req's before entering the "Nursing Program." I graduated after another four semesters. I found most advisors and professors helpful and enjoyed the selection of clinical options. I am now working in home health and enjoy what I do.


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