Military vs civilian nursing curicculum? - page 2

All, I'm a 91W in the reserves planning my next career move as I approach 60 college credits. I have been to a civillian nursing program but found the dominance of psychosocial curicculum to be disapointing. There is so... Read More

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    1. Facts.


    a. The AMEDD Enlisted Commissioning Program (AECP) provides eligible active duty soldiers the opportunity to complete a baccalaureate degree in nursing (BSN), become a registered nurse (RN), and be commissioned in the Army Nurse Corps (active component). Participants continue to receive their current pay and allowances during school while in the program for up to 24 consecutive months of enrollment. This program funds academic costs of up to $3,000 per semester or $2,250 per quarter.



    b. Deadline for receipt of applications for FY is July. The selection board will convene on ____________. No exceptions for late applications will be considered.

    You may want to check this out, it is the only "military" option I know for RN.

    CPT Mike

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  2. 0
    Quote from mwbeah
    1. Facts.


    a. The AMEDD Enlisted Commissioning Program (AECP) provides eligible active duty soldiers the opportunity to complete a baccalaureate degree in nursing (BSN), become a registered nurse (RN), and be commissioned in the Army Nurse Corps (active component). Participants continue to receive their current pay and allowances during school while in the program for up to 24 consecutive months of enrollment. This program funds academic costs of up to $3,000 per semester or $2,250 per quarter.



    b. Deadline for receipt of applications for FY is July. The selection board will convene on ____________. No exceptions for late applications will be considered.

    You may want to check this out, it is the only "military" option I know for RN.

    CPT Mike
    Here is the link:

    http://www.usarec.army.mil/AECP/
  3. 0
    Thanks for the link,

    Since I have more school to do, an age waiver is the thing.

    Everything I've seen says that the Guard can only waive up to 35 y/o for a commission. A warrant officer goes up to 46(I'm 44)but you must complete WOCS before 46. I wouldn't be offered a commission until completing the BSN. That's at least 3 years from my credits now if I could get an online ADN.

    If there were such thing as an online ADN that would take my first semester for credit, I could get that done. All one has to do for the program is get accepted to an RN-BSN with <24 months to complete with 36 months service left.

    I have plenty of service left, my APFT scores are good(220s right now), I have some awards, My chain would write glorius LORs and I have the mental capacity to endure an accelerated program. The fact that the age waiver would be difficult to count on would make it impractical I think.
  4. 0
    Quote from Weebils-Wobble
    Thanks for the link,

    Since I have more school to do, an age waiver is the thing.

    Everything I've seen says that the Guard can only waive up to 35 y/o for a commission. A warrant officer goes up to 46(I'm 44)but you must complete WOCS before 46. I wouldn't be offered a commission until completing the BSN. That's at least 3 years from my credits now if I could get an online ADN.

    If there were such thing as an online ADN that would take my first semester for credit, I could get that done. All one has to do for the program is get accepted to an RN-BSN with <24 months to complete with 36 months service left.

    I have plenty of service left, my APFT scores are good(220s right now), I have some awards, My chain would write glorius LORs and I have the mental capacity to endure an accelerated program. The fact that the age waiver would be difficult to count on would make it impractical I think.
    For nurses, the age limit for entrance (as BSN) is I believe 47. I will google that later and get back to you.

    Mike
  5. 0
    To qualify for an appointment as an Officer in the Army Nurse Corps, you must:

    • Meet the prescribed medical and moral standards for appointment as a commissioned Officer
    • Be a United States citizen or have a permanent visa
    • Have an associate’s degree in nursing or a three-year nursing diploma or a bachelor of science in nursing for Reserve; have a bachelor's degree in nursing (BSN) from an accredited school of nursing for Active Duty
    • Have a valid, unrestricted RN license
    • Be 21-46 years of age

    If you’re an Army, Active Duty Enlisted Soldier in any MOS, you may qualify for the Army Medical Department's Enlisted Commissioning Program. You could attend college in a full-time status to complete your Bachelor of Science in Nursing and be commissioned as Second Lieutenant upon attending Officer Basic Course (OBC).

    • You must have a minimum of three years (may be waived) and a maximum of 10 years (may be waived) active federal service at the time of commissioning and degree completion
    • You must be able to complete your degree within 24 calendar months of beginning the program
    • You’ll receive full pay and allowances and you may even be promoted while attending the program
    • The Army pays for tuition, books and mandatory fees for up to 24 months of schooling
    • Active Duty service obligation is three years
    • Must be able to meet commissioning requirements as outlined in AR135-100 and AR135-101


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