staffing

  1. I'm really concerned about inadequate staffing. I work in LTC as charge nurse on a skilled unit which also has ICF residents. Total 30 beds--getting full now but not quite. We have 1 charge, 1 med nurse and most days 2 aides--sometimes 3. It is awful--no time to spend on anything but quick assessments and you just hurry all day.I see in the news Clinton has asked for 1 billion to use for safety issues in LTC. I just joined ANA and plan to do some writing to my representative ( Northeast Mo) about safe staffing. Can you all join me if you haven't already?
    Candy
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   kewlnurse1
    Candy,
    I would be HAPPY to join you - what you are going through almost seems like the status quo here in NC, sad as it may be. It seems that 90% of the problems can be solved by good staffing -and the state keeps their requirements so low that it is unsafe. Best of luck to you, you have quite a torch to carry.
  4. by   Tiara
    When the staffing level is inappropriate, you should document it. When you accept an assignment with nothing in writing to show that you are forced to work in unsafe conditions, it can be assumed that you feel you are capable of handling it. If an error should occur, then at least you have written that you are working under protest of a sort.
  5. by   Lorraine bryan
    I totally agree with you Tiara. We should always document (as I do ) when your ward/unit is inadequately staffed. If it was done every time someone someday my address the problems we face. We are not only putting the patients at risk we also risk loosing our registration if something goes wrong. I for one am fed up of not having the time to spend with patients. A little chat, a smile the holding of hands can often go a long way to reassure a sick patient or relative.
  6. by   huddlero
    Originally posted by Tiara:
    When the staffing level is inappropriate, you should document it. When you accept an assignment with nothing in writing to show that you are forced to work in unsafe conditions, it can be assumed that you feel you are capable of handling it. If an error should occur, then at least you have written that you are working under protest of a sort.
  7. by   huddlero
    I am a confused new RN.I work on a 36 bed renal unit .No transplants but CAPD at least 2or 4 of them. Staffing is 3 RNs and 2 aides if we are lucky ,but we have been given 1 aide or 2 RNs and 1LPN (shes very good but I still have to sign her charts) If the census is lower there can be 2 RNs and we can each have 14 pts. Maybe I am too new but after taking care of 14 pts when I sit and do my notes I almost forget who I had seen. My report sheet is my lifeline. I want to know who do you complain to if the hospital do this.Is there a state regulation re: how many pts an RN can take care of or is this the norm. I make a good salary so I am not too anxious to leave but I really fear the safety of my pts and my licences. Feed back is much appreciated.
  8. by   Tiara
    You should take a look at the California Nurses' site: www.calnurse.org You will find a lot of interesting information, including documenting staffing problems.
  9. by   km rn
    Each unit of our nursing home is staffed like this:

    Days and PMs: 2 nurses and 6 CNAs for 48 residents if fully staffed
    2 nurses and 5 CNAs for 48 residents if critically staffed
    1 transport aide to help transport residents to/from meals, pass trays, and feed residents that have not swallowing issues.

    Nights: 1 nurse and 2 CNAs for 48 residents.

    We do not have any ventilator residents. We do have 2 24 bed Alzheimer's units.

    If staffing is less than full, then an overhead page is made and all available administrative staff come help make beds, fold laundry, pass meal trays, etc.



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staffing