Poop in nursing - page 9

by KATRN78

13,915 Views | 94 Comments

I am an RN. My niece is 18 and hoping to go to nursing school. Recently she told me that there will be no poop cleaning at her nursing school or in the hospital she plans to work in. "I am not going to be THAT kind of nurse. I... Read More


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    Hoping my many months of caring for a bulldog puppy in diapers due to a spinal deformity has toughened me to the various sights and smells of poop. Or maybe caring for two adult MR patients in a home setting will help. In any event, we will all have to deal with it, and there is nothing about nursing and patient care that I am not looking forward to in my clinicals this Fall. I fear being in the situation where someone will have to care for me in that regard more than I fear caring for someone elses personal needs.
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    Just received my CNA and start nursing school in August. Did CNA clinical in a sub acute so glad I experienced it before nursing school. And I just turned 18 so the millennium stuff is crap... I saw poop for dayssss!
    WideOpenHeart likes this.
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    Quote from LoriKiersteadMattis
    Hoping my many months of caring for a bulldog puppy in diapers due to a spinal deformity has toughened me to the various sights and smells of poop. Or maybe caring for two adult MR patients in a home setting will help. In any event, we will all have to deal with it, and there is nothing about nursing and patient care that I am not looking forward to in my clinicals this Fall. I fear being in the situation where someone will have to care for me in that regard more than I fear caring for someone elses personal needs.
    You'll be great - and model behavior for your classmates, too. Your post makes me think of another point, too. The emphasis on poop strikes me as totally out of proportion as it is one function of one body system. Working as a CNA puts you into contact with poop more often because hygiene and activities of daily living are the focus of their jobs. As a nurse we're supposed to think of all of it as inter-related.
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    HA!!! You are too funny this made my day.

    You must have totally missed the poop free nursing school advertisements (y'know the ones with the lady shaking her finger at a soiled chux), and it sucks that you also work at a poop-friendly hospital. Seriously poor choices on your part.
    wooh likes this.
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    I see this poop thread is still going on lol...
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    [QUOTE=psu_213;7381668]Maybe (maybe!!) in LTC. In the ER and other hospital units in which I have worked the aides/techs/etc. seem to have run for the hills every time one of my pt's has an "explosion." QUOTE]

    This definitely seems to be true in my area as well. Most of the hospitals barely use aides/techs at all, one in the area cut them completely from the staff a few years ago and the others only use them on med/surg as far as I know and even then you may have 1 aide to 14-20 patients. Meanwhile working on my dementia unit I have one aide for every 6 or 7 residents. Most of the nurses there won't even assist with a transfer let alone clean someone up. I was an Aide first so I have no problem helping them if it gets crazy but for the most part I could pretty much avoid poop altogether, well except for the wafting into the halls and the occasion request to take a look at something out of the ordinary. I guess LTC does have at least one perk
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    Poop is natural. But as has been pointed out, we're hardwired to stay away from it. Improper and/or inadequate sanitation has been and still is the cause of a lot of health problems.

    If we take the proper precautions it shouldn't be much of a danger. I've handled the dooky of Hep A patients, in gloves and gown of course and I am fine.

    It is understandable to want to avoid it. Just don't give in to the desire. You will not probably ever love it, but you will probably learn to accept it and to be able to deal with it.

    And remember, being sick is stressful. Being incontinent is often shameful for people. Handle them and their waste with dignity and respect and do so promptly. This will go a long way toward increasing their trust in you and that can't be undervalued.
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    When I was a student/new grad, I would almost gag at the smell of stool.

    Now, four years later as a Hospice RN, I can do a dressing change on very odorous, necrotic (and protruding) carcinomas without flinching. What has always gotten me through is thinking to myself: "these people/pts deserve dignity. Making a face or turning my head away serves no purpose but to make the pt feel bad or worse."

    ETA: also, a pet peeve of mine is the word "diaper" when referring to adult briefs. Kids wear diapers, Adults wear briefs.

    For me, it's all about dignity and respect for the pt.
    Anoetos and loriangel14 like this.
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    Quote from Nurse_Diane
    When I was a student/new grad, I would almost gag at the smell of stool.

    Now, four years later as a Hospice RN, I can do a dressing change on very odorous, necrotic (and protruding) carcinomas without flinching. What has always gotten me through is thinking to myself: "these people/pts deserve dignity. Making a face or turning my head away serves no purpose but to make the pt feel bad or worse."

    ETA: also, a pet peeve of mine is the word "diaper" when referring to adult briefs. Kids wear diapers, Adults wear briefs.

    For me, it's all about dignity and respect for the pt.
    Amen. And the seniors I take care of don't wear "bibs" at meal time. They're aprons.
    Nurse_Diane and Glycerine82 like this.
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    Quote from loriangel14
    Amen. And the seniors I take care of don't wear "bibs" at meal time. They're aprons.
    Where I worked it was a "clothing protector." At least that's what we aides had to call it....the resident's call them bibs (same for the brief/diaper issue).


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