Managing life outside of school... - page 4

I am about to enter the 1st semester of an ADN program and I'm curious how others with families manage home life. I'm married with 4 children, a 13 y.o. son, a 9 y.o. son, a 5 y.o. daughter and a 1 y.o. daughter. My husband is... Read More

  1. 0
    There are a lot of great ideas here. I graduated in May. I have twins who just turned 8. I set aside one night a week for family night. That night we always went out to chic-fil-a and then got a movie from redbox. I would often fall asleep during the movie due to that being a clinical day, but the kids were so excited to have one night a week just for them. I also got an old recliner for the corner of my bedroom and studied there.

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights: Student Edition newsletter.

  2. 0
    Quote from GrnTea
    I'm a great believer in having kids do more around the house. A four year old can set the table, and this leads the way to participating in the household at a higher level when s/he grows.
    A six-year-old can throw laundry in the machine, add premeasured soap packets, and push the start button, then throw the wet things in the dryer and push the button. The advantage to that is that as they get older, there is no fuss over, "I don't have anything clean to wear!" because the answer is (and you will only have to say it once), "And whose fault is that?" It might be a little late for the 13-yr-old, but now is the time to say she takes complete responsibility for her own clothing; teach her how to iron a shirt and how to load a washer if she doesn't know already.
    An eight-year-old can form hamburger patties and fry them, and put a package of frozen peas in the microwave, and pour the milk. Mine made their own sandwiches for school from first grade onward.
    All of this while they see their mom working hard for school and doing a lot around the house too. Builds a foundation for a strong family when everyone works together to accomplish a goal.
    PREACH!!!! You are absolutely right. I plan to incorporate this when I get into the program. Bc what you say is oh so true
  3. 0
    My study habits have always been to study a little to a lot everyday. It cuts down my study time before tests, and it is easy to spend a little time every day on new/old material. It has worked to this point and I just started our program. I will let you know if it continues to work out!
  4. 0
    Quote from ATLback2RN
    PREACH!!!! You are absolutely right. I plan to incorporate this when I get into the program. Bc what you say is oh so true
    Don't wait. This advice isn't merely for people in nursing school. I promise you that anything you can do now to stave off hassles in adolescence later is worth its weight in gold.

    My son and his wife have taught their two-year-old that after meals we "clean up," which in her case means picking up the food bits on the floor, putting them in the trash, and carrying her own (unbreakable) dishes to the sink. We do this at grandma's house too.
  5. 0
    Quote from GrnTea

    Don't wait. This advice isn't merely for people in nursing school. I promise you that anything you can do now to stave off hassles in adolescence later is worth its weight in gold.

    My son and his wife have taught their two-year-old that after meals we "clean up," which in her case means picking up the food bits on the floor, putting them in the trash, and carrying her own (unbreakable) dishes to the sink. We do this at grandma's house too.
    Ohhhh Im starting tomorrow!!!! I feel so worn down by the end of the evening and my 5 year old can ABSOLUTELY lend a hand to help!
  6. 0
    Hats off to you for entering the nursing program! I know it is not easy having to balance school, work, family, and other personal circumstances. I will be completing a 4 year nursing program this year, so starting Tuesday, September 3rd, all that is left is 360 hours of preceptorship!

    Since making the transition from the LPN to RN program back in April 2010, all I can say is that hard work = motivation, dedication, and perseverance are the requirements needed to successfully complete the nursing program. With 4 children (now 11, 7, and 5 year old twins) and a supportive husband, it is definitely possible. I am not saying it is easy, but it is doable!

    This past 5 or 6 years (this includes the LPN program, pre-requisites, and the actual BSN program) has been a journey for everyone! Using a calendar/agenda/smartphones to organize your upcoming exams, tests, clinical schedule, your LIFE is definitely a must! You will learn that organization will be one of your best asset as a mom, student, and nurse!! I was able to maintain a clean home, assist and supervise the kids with their homework (while trying to complete my own as soon as the kids went to bed), and communicate with my husband through text and facebook. Lol For some people, this sounds like a sad reality of marriage but we are both tech-savy people and we knew that life will not be "peaches and cream" for our family of 6!

    Just keep telling yourself that each semester, there is an end to all this. When that time comes, make-up for those sleepless nights and plan something special for you and your family. All the best to you and for those who are in the nursing program!
  7. 0
    Quote from GrnTea

    Don't wait. This advice isn't merely for people in nursing school. I promise you that anything you can do now to stave off hassles in adolescence later is worth its weight in gold.

    My son and his wife have taught their two-year-old that after meals we "clean up," which in her case means picking up the food bits on the floor, putting them in the trash, and carrying her own (unbreakable) dishes to the sink. We do this at grandma's house too.
    Starting this with my 5 yr old TODAY!
  8. 0
    I am a mother of four who is about to begin my second year of an ADN program. I too, find it difficult to study in quiet areas, I am so accustomed to the chaos and noise.

    My first piece of advice is not to fret about getting A's. I used to be a straight A student, and now I am happy with a C. I find that it has helped my self-esteem and motivation not to be discouraged about that. I'm not saying that you should aim for a C, but don't be hard on yourself about it.

    Having a sturdy 3-inch binder has also been very helpful for me. I don't know how your program is laid out, but I find it very beneficial to have all my powerpoints, handouts, notes and study guides for each unit grouped together separately. It makes me much easier to find what you need when studying for unit exams.

    Studying has been my biggest challenge. I am someone who never really had to study. That all changed for me in nursing school. I have tried many different tactics, and the one I find most successful is NOT cramming at the last minute. Study in small increments every day, not all at once. Having a supportive study group is also important for me. We don't necessarily have formal sessions, but we do bounce things off of each other on the ride in or during clinical, and we are in constant contact on the phone and computer. Getting someone else's take on something is sometimes all you need to see what you may have been missing. I also try to fit in NCLEX style questions that pertain to the unit I am studying for. It helps me learn how to read the exam questions better, and figure out what they are really asking for.

    Being organized is key. With 4 kids, I find I have a lot of difficulty with that. There's my stuff, then there is the stuff for the four of them. White-boards are fantastic to let everyone in the house know what the week looks like, activity and work-wise. Google calender is also a great app and will send you reminders. My problem is remembering to input stuff into the calender in the first place.

    A previous poster mentioned having the kids pitch in with age-appropriate chores, and I am 100% in agreement with that statement. Kids need to learn life skills anyway, and having less on your own plate can't hurt. With that being said, you have to be willing to let them do the chores, and realize that they won't be doing them the same way you would. Having a supportive spouse is also huge. I have so much admiration for single moms who are pursuing an education in any field, but especially nursing. Nursing school is a substantial time commitment, not to mention energy draining. I am extremely fortunate to have an awesome husband. He is not the father of my children, but you would never know unless I told you. He is also in school for computers. But, he makes a point to be there for events, drives the kids to appointments I can't make and events I can't attend, practices and games. Not to mention that he is a fantastic cook. (evidenced by the 30 lbs. I've gained since I met him )

    Last, but not least..friends. A social life of some sort. It can be a life-saver. I have one really close friend that I make a point to hang out with at least once a week. It helps me decompress, and I really miss her anyway. I feel like I never see her anymore. Also, my nursing school BFF's are great. We hang out regularly. We start out with studying, but eventually we end up just talking, eating, and enjoying each others company. You absolutely have to make some time for yourself to have a little fun and forget about the rigors of nursing school every so often. It will benefit your outlook on life.
  9. 2
    Another nursing school mama to 4 kids (mine are boys, aged 14, 12, 9 and almost-7). They're all inlots of sports, etc etc. I am the mom who sits in the corner of the bleachers with her textbook and notecards everywhere, lol! Things I've found most helpful:
    - google calendar for each person in the family, and one for just my school stuff. Each of the older three has access to their calendar (as well as my hubby) so they can add appointments, important games, etc, and then I see them all aggregated on my one "master" in my smartphone app. This is a LIFESAVER!
    - once a month blitz cooking: one sunday a month, I'll spend several hours in the kitchen prepping meals to feed the freezer, so that on hectic days either I or one of the older kids can just pop it in the oven/microwave and instant dinner! (things like casseroles, soups, stews, meatballs, burritos, pasta bakes, etc)
    - scheduling study sessions in one of the quiet study rooms on campus after class in the week before exams - since I'm already on campus it's easier to manage, and doesn't require arranging more childcare (just for whomever is with the youngest to stay longer)
    - planning family evenings where I completely focus on family time - board games, movie night, etc. Fun stuff that helps us reconnect and enjoy each other
    - setting up carpools for sporting practices/games. I don't attend every one of all the boys' events. Even if I weren't in school, I wouldn't be able to because often their games overlap. Plus; DH and I feel strongly that our kids aren't doing sports for *our* entertainment, they do it because they love the sport(s) and truly enjoy play ing - they play for themselves, not for us. Of course, I enjoy watching them play, but I don't feel the need to attend every practice/game, and I've had my kids say several times that they appreciate that we're not crazy overbearing sports parents like you see so often on the sidelines. I thinkus being encouraging but not overbearing enables them to take ownership for themselves.
    - age-appropraite chores and responsibilities. All but the youngest pack their own lunch, oldest two do their own laundry and clean their shared bathroom. I do not micromanage their lives - they are resposible for making sure homework gets done, chores get done, and they've got the appropriate gear with them when they head out for practices - I am not a maid, nor am I a personal assistant
    - friends! I've got a whole tribe of people who help me when it's crunch time. From carpooling, to bringing us takeout during finals, to picking up my sick kid when I'm stuck in clinical and can't leave, etc. It truly does take a village!!!!
    ArrowRN and FlufferNutter like this.
  10. 1
    Quote from GrnTea
    I'm a great believer in having kids do more around the house. A four year old can set the table, and this leads the way to participating in the household at a higher level when s/he grows.
    A six-year-old can throw laundry in the machine, add premeasured soap packets, and push the start button, then throw the wet things in the dryer and push the button. The advantage to that is that as they get older, there is no fuss over, "I don't have anything clean to wear!" because the answer is (and you will only have to say it once), "And whose fault is that?" It might be a little late for the 13-yr-old, but now is the time to say she takes complete responsibility for her own clothing; teach her how to iron a shirt and how to load a washer if she doesn't know already.
    An eight-year-old can form hamburger patties and fry them, and put a package of frozen peas in the microwave, and pour the milk. Mine made their own sandwiches for school from first grade onward.
    All of this while they see their mom working hard for school and doing a lot around the house too. Builds a foundation for a strong family when everyone works together to accomplish a goal.
    Times a million!!

    I have an 8 and 7yr old and they both have chores. They help do dishes, sort and fold laundry, vacuum, take care of the dog, help their dad in the yard, etc etc etc. If it doesn't require a lot of elbow grease or precision, they can do it! It helps me keep the house tidy and it helps teach them to become functioning members of society. What woman wants to marry a man who can't load a dishwasher or clean his own underwear? I'm training up men that I can be proud of.
    FlufferNutter likes this.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top