A lamb in a den of wolves! - page 3

The nurse that you're paired up with during your clinical rotations can make or break your love of a certain field. I fully understand that you (RN) has been at the hospital since 6:45am, or earlier, have 6+ patients who don't... Read More

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    To Do-over: lucky you! At our facility, the clinical instructors are spread pretty thin and have students on multiple units so they only see their student once or twice during the student's shift. So the nurse of the patient also ends up with the responsibilty of the student. The student gets to do stuff and gets taught based on the nurse's availability and willingness to teach. Sometimes it works out and sometimes it doesn't. We don't always get a choice because we are a teaching facility for doctors, nurses, RTs, and pharmacists. Students are usually a joy to have because they usually really want to learn and I like to teach so it works out for me, but not for all my co-workers are like me.

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    Quote from dah doh
    To Do-over: lucky you! At our facility, the clinical instructors are spread pretty thin and have students on multiple units so they only see their student once or twice during the student's shift. So the nurse of the patient also ends up with the responsibilty of the student. The student gets to do stuff and gets taught based on the nurse's availability and willingness to teach. Sometimes it works out and sometimes it doesn't. We don't always get a choice because we are a teaching facility for doctors, nurses, RTs, and pharmacists.
    This is the way my clinical experience is. Our clinical group has the hospital to ourselves, so we're spread out around the entire place and rarely see our CI. We can text her if we need her, but the results are mixed. There have been days when I've had absolutely nothing to do other than my assessment and paperwork unless the CNA is looking for some help. I'm really, really not a fan of the set-up.
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    I am pretty surprised that students are even allowed on a unit without an instructor physically present.

    When I was in school, there were limits to how many students an instructor could have... 8 or 10, I think. Our groups were never more than 8.
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    Quote from Do-over
    I am pretty surprised that students are even allowed on a unit without an instructor physically present.

    When I was in school, there were limits to how many students an instructor could have... 8 or 10, I think. Our groups were never more than 8.
    Hospitals would rather have unsupervised students than 10 students on one floor. Obviously the system of check-offs before performing a skill independently at the hospital is somewhat satisfactory or the hospitals would have no problem kicking us out the door!
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    What I described was how it was for me in nursing school 15 yrs ago too. We had to "page" (pre smartphones...lol) our instructor if we wanted to do a procedure or meds, but we were "highly encouraged" to do it with our nurse if she was willing because it would sometimes take the instructor an hour to get back to us. Nowadays, the clinical instructor had maybe a dozen students max that she is in charge of. She places a few in CCU, a few in ER, a few in step-down, and maybe 1-2 in OR. These units aren't close by...so it's a lot of walking for her. Most of the nursing schools in our area are like this now. When I have a student, I never bother with the clinical instructor because most of them aren't ICU nurses anyways. I overheard one of them "teaching" her student wrongly, so I had to correct it anyways! Oh, and there are sometimes multiple nursing schools at our facility on any given day and shift! It's so confusing!
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    Quote from Stephalump
    This is the way my clinical experience is. Our clinical group has the hospital to ourselves, so we're spread out around the entire place and rarely see our CI. We can text her if we need her, but the results are mixed. There have been days when I've had absolutely nothing to do other than my assessment and paperwork unless the CNA is looking for some help. I'm really, really not a fan of the set-up.
    I have taught in circumstances where I was forced (against my objections, but because the facility's units were too small to support the entire group on one unit) to have students on multiple units, and what I've done in those circumstances is to keep circulating constantly from one unit to the next the entire day; so, if I'm not there at the moment, I will be within the next 20 minutes or so. Makes for a lot more physical effort on my part, but I can certainly use the exercise and I'm not comfortable with leaving students on a unit without me at least showing up frequently during the day.
    GrnTea likes this.


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