Instructor on a power trip - page 2

by snapshot

Okay all, I have an issue with an instructor and I need an outside perspective. It's a long one and I'll probably give to many details, so if you can bear with me, I appreciate it. Backstory: I am in my second semester of... Read More


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    I think you should go to the Dean. If its only the usual suspects of complainers and students grasping at a chance not to fail than this does not give this unfair situation credibility. It is not fair to lose marks this way. This is your academic currency, if you want scholarships or a high GPA for future education reasons than these marks taken away unfairly can affect that. Your dean respects you, write him an email explaining that you are extremely soory to have to ask for his involvment as you know he is busy, but are going to have to on this. You have more evidence than you think. You have your emails to prove you notified the teachers of your absence (and for good reason, hope your feeling better), quiz to prove your attendence and syllabus & college policies to help back you. Don't let the bully win.
  2. 0
    My advice to you would be to document everything carefully. Then, go to the dean and in an objective and factual way (non-accusatory) let him know what is going on in that classroom. He needs to know. This is an expected part of professional behavior - being assertive, but not aggressive. Once you become a nurse and are working in a practice environment, an important acquired skill is being able to stand up for yourself (and advocating for your patients) in a professional manner. Often it is much easier to just "let things go," as confrontation (however civil), pointing out the wrong, and making waves is uncomfortable for all involved. But seldom is acquiescence the right thing to do. It takes much courage to do the right thing, because there is risk involved, especially for you, a vulnerable student.


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