Group Interview Update

  1. The good news: It wasn't really a group interview . . . a group of maybe 25-30 applicants came, there was a very brief informational session, the faculty was introduced, then we just waited in the conference room for our names to be called for an individual interview with a faculty member (there are 8 or 9). I was in the first group taken into the private offices.

    The bad news . . . the faculty member who interviewed me didn't seem to think I was a very good fit for this ADN program. This is very disappointing to me, as it is my first choice.

    I'll write her a letter this evening (cc: the director of the program), thanking her for her time today and reiterating why I *do* think I'm a good fit. Other than that, I don't think there's much I can do but wait for the acceptance/rejection letter, which I won't see until after the first of April . . . that's a long time to be depressed!

    I have been accepted into a BSN program, which I'd finish in maybe 2-1/2 to 3 years because I already have a BA. That'll be my fall back position, but I really wanted this ADN school Rigorous curriculum, lots of clinical time, small setting so you really get a sense of community among the nursing students, good commute, reasonable tuition.

    It's a bummer, but I'm trying to keep my chin up!
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   dianacs
    April...that sure is a long time to wait. Why did they think you wouldn't be a good fit? Writing a letter sounds like a great idea, very professional.
  4. by   JudithL_in_NH
    Dianacs,

    The prof was very specific about her reservations, but I don't think I should talk about them in a public forum. I'm pretty identifiable via my username, and my state probably has five ADN programs, tops. I just don't think it would be very professional; things could get back to the program second hand.

    I addressed the reservations with her as best I could, and will reconfirm my belief that I'd be awesome in their program in that letter. Then I'll just wait.

    The BSN program told me I was a strong candidate, that they were impressed with my background, transcripts, letters of rec, attitude, etc. On paper, this program has similar admissions criteria, so I was flabbergasted and disappointed at the implication I'm not a very good candidate for their school.
  5. by   jeannet83
    Judith, I am just curious-most folks with BA can do an accelerated BSN program. We have one in the city that I live in where you can actually complete the degree full-time from May to May (one calendar year). Why so long for your BSN program that you have applied to? Just curious.

    Good luck to you. Who knows, even when one gets bad vibes from an interview, they can still be surprised. I wish the best of luck to you!
  6. by   JudithL_in_NH
    Jeannet,

    There are no accelerated programs near enough for me to commute to. NH is just a teeny bit out in nowhere. Boston has at least a couple, but that's a good hour and a half away. My family is still my highest priority, and adding three hours of commuting time to classes and clinicals just won't cut it. The state university may have an accelerated program, but that's nearly as far from home for me as Boston.

    In the BSN program that has accepted me, I would complete the Nursing courses in two years. However they require a couple of extra classes because it is a Catholic college (religion classes) and they won't accept a couple of my classes from my BA in transfer. For example, the university I went to required either sociology 101 or anthropology 101, and I chose anthropology as part of my BA. The BSN college requires a sociology course, anthropolgy won't cut it for them, so I'll have to take the sociology. I also need an advanced psychology course; for my BA, I took advanced philosophy instead. The BSN program also requires a summer semester in Mental Health Nursing; they don't cover it within the regular nursing classes. So, in the end, to get the BSN I'd probably go five regular semesters and one summer semester.

    Thanks for the positive vibes!
  7. by   jeannet83
    Judith, sorry that there aren't any accelerated BSN programs in your area. Sounds like the adn program really is the most cost-effective and time saving way to go. Well, keep your chin up, the interview is just one part of the whole process. Certainly, writing a letter like you are going to do is an excellent idea. Good luck and keep us posted! Jeanne
  8. by   Angella Walker
    One word of advice, make sure you send the letter in soon. After interview sessions with graduates, all of the interviewers meet in a group meeting and discuss possible candidates and candidates they choos to put on a alternative list (since not everyone accepts the positions). Make the letter to the point but sincere. Make sure not to make the interviewer seem like a bad guy, but thank her for her imput and re-interate your points of what would make you an excellent candidate for the program.

    I work for a PA school (btw they don't respect BSN students.....but that is a whole other story), but I have seen this work on more than one occasion. If all else fails, you do have options which is a major thing. NEVER go into anything without a plan B, C, D or E...lol
  9. by   litepath
    the faculty member who interviewed me didn't seem to think I was a very good fit for this ADN program

    ~~Sorry to hear of your disappointment!!! But maybe theres more to it. Could be that this particular instructor sees/feels that he/she would have a personality conflict with you or something like that. in that case she'd be doing you a favor by rejecting you.

    ~~take care~~

    ~~~opportunity lies in the unknown~~~~
  10. by   llg
    I'm sorry that your "first choice" program may not work out for you. However, your "fall back" BSN program sounds like a real possibility ... and while it may not be the best fit for your needs now, in 10 years, having a BSN instead of an ADN may provide you with a big advantage that you will appreciate at that time.

    Good luck,
    llg

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