Grades In Nursing School - page 3

ok...i might've brought this up before - a while back - but seriously - what is the thinking behind writing tests so hard that few people even pass last week, i took two tests. the average for the... Read More

  1. by   llg
    Someone asked for tips.

    It's been a long time since I was an undergraduate student, but I taught it not all that long ago -- and I noticed that one thing had not changed since the olden days:
    So many of the students who struggle seem to do so because they have trouble determining what is important and what is not. That leads them to waste time and effort trying to memorize stuff that doesn't really help them with the test -- while failing to invest their efforts in the stuff that the teacher thinks is most important and will emphasize on the test.

    For example: Some teachers construct their tests so that it measures how well the student can APPLY the facts they learn in class to situations. The students who spent all of their time memorize detailed facts may do badly on such a test because spitting out facts doesn't answer the question. Answering the question requires an understanding on how to use the facts to solve a practice problem. That requires an understanding of how to assess the situation in the question, prioritize the different aspects of the questions, and select the "best answer" that is not only consistent with the facts but also consistent with the principles of providing good care.

    If it is simply the memorization of facts that is giving you problems, then you need to come up with ways to improve your memory -- word games, etc. that help prompt your memory and/or organize the information to make it easier to remember. Personally, I always struggled with the memorization of large, meaningless lists of stuff -- but never had trouble with the "how to apply my knowledge" questions.

    The "trick" to any class is to figure out what the teacher wants -- by asking the teacher, asking upper classmen, etc. Find out what type of test questions are on the test (application, memorization, etc.) and also what content areas are most important. Then, invest mot of your time in that.

    llg
  2. by   Mkue
    Originally posted by NurseChic81
    Congrats, M!

    I hope to be on the Dean's List this semester, too.
    Wish me luck!
    Good Luck to you and everyone.. keep up the good work !
  3. by   Mkue
    Originally posted by llg
    Someone asked for tips.

    It's been a long time since I was an undergraduate student, but I taught it not all that long ago -- and I noticed that one thing had not changed since the olden days:
    So many of the students who struggle seem to do so because they have trouble determining what is important and what is not. That leads them to waste time and effort trying to memorize stuff that doesn't really help them with the test -- while failing to invest their efforts in the stuff that the teacher thinks is most important and will emphasize on the test.

    For example: Some teachers construct their tests so that it measures how well the student can APPLY the facts they learn in class to situations. The students who spent all of their time memorize detailed facts may do badly on such a test because spitting out facts doesn't answer the question. Answering the question requires an understanding on how to use the facts to solve a practice problem. That requires an understanding of how to assess the situation in the question, prioritize the different aspects of the questions, and select the "best answer" that is not only consistent with the facts but also consistent with the principles of providing good care.

    If it is simply the memorization of facts that is giving you problems, then you need to come up with ways to improve your memory -- word games, etc. that help prompt your memory and/or organize the information to make it easier to remember. Personally, I always struggled with the memorization of large, meaningless lists of stuff -- but never had trouble with the "how to apply my knowledge" questions.

    The "trick" to any class is to figure out what the teacher wants -- by asking the teacher, asking upper classmen, etc. Find out what type of test questions are on the test (application, memorization, etc.) and also what content areas are most important. Then, invest mot of your time in that.

    llg
    llg, excellent post !! thanks
  4. by   beaRNwhenIgroUP
    Originally posted by mkue
    llg, excellent post !! thanks
    ditto!
  5. by   JennyRN2B
    I tell ya, it never ceases to amaze me all of the stuff I have picked up by reading this board.

    Thanks!!
    Jen

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