Can Anyone Help With This Math?

  1. IM HAVING A HARD TIME WITH SOME MATH CAN ANYONE HELP? THIS LOOKS EASY BUT I CANT SEEM TO GET IT, CAN ANYONE SHOW ME HOW? LUV U GUYS!!!!

    EX: Prior to CHEMO, the pt is premedicated with diphenhydramine 50 mg IV in 50 ml over 15 minutes. What rae the pump settings?

    Ex: Calcitonin 4 IU/kgis ordered for a patient every 12 hrs. Pt weighs 175 lbs. Available are 200 IU vials. How much medication do you plan to administer? How many vials do you need?
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   vamedic4
    4 IU/kg every 12 hours, patient weighs 175 lbs.

    1. Find weight in kg. Divide 175 by 2.2
    2. Mulitply that weight by the # of units per kg to get dosage.
    3. Once you figure the dosage...you'll know how many vials you need.
  4. by   Achoo!
    Ex: Calcitonin 4 IU/kgis ordered for a patient every 12 hrs. Pt weighs 175 lbs. Available are 200 IU vials. How much medication do you plan to administer? How many vials do you need?[/QUOTE]


    First, calculate pounds to kg. 175/2.2= 79.5 or 80 kg.

    4 U/kg.. multiply 4x80= 320 Units I plan to administer, which would take 2 vials. Someone correct me if I am wrong.
  5. by   Achoo!
    [QUOTE=buterflycf]IM HAVING A HARD TIME WITH SOME MATH CAN ANYONE HELP? THIS LOOKS EASY BUT I CANT SEEM TO GET IT, CAN ANYONE SHOW ME HOW? LUV U GUYS!!!!

    EX: Prior to CHEMO, the pt is premedicated with diphenhydramine 50 mg IV in 50 ml over 15 minutes. What rae the pump settings?

    rate x drop factor
    ------------------- plug your numbers in and you'll get the drop factor.
    time
  6. by   Daytonite
    prior to chemo, the pt is premedicated with diphenhydramine 50 mg iv in 50 ml over 15 minutes. what rae the pump settings?
    the answer to working this problem is in setting up a simple ratio of proportions, cross multiplying and solving a very simple algebra problem. if you are going to give 50 ml over 15 minutes, then how much will be given over 60 minutes, which is one hour. all iv pumps are programmed to deliver iv fluids at "x" number of ml, or cc's, per hour. here's the set up:
    • 50 ml / 15 minutes = x ml / 60 minutes --> 15x = 3,000 (after cross multiplying) --> x = 200 ml (per 60 minutes, which is the same as 1 hour)
    calcitonin 4 iu/kgis ordered for a patient every 12 hrs. pt weighs 175 lbs. available are 200 iu vials. how much medication do you plan to administer? how many vials do you need?

    now, i'm going to set this up using a formula where the dose desired is divided by the dose on hand and then use dimensional analysis to perform the conversion factor to divide out, or factor out, all the labels on all these numbers which is going to leave us with the desired answer which is the number of a vials you need in order to give this medication. as you look at my setup, remember that i have had to break down a complex fraction (a fraction the was in the denominator divided by a number) which is why i ended up with the fraction of 1/200 iu for the dose on hand. let me also say that calcitonin is given subcutaneously or im, so this is a real world problem and you would normally be drawing up a syringe of medication for injection into the patient. here is the set up:
    4 iu / 1 kg (dose desired) x 1 / 200 iu (dose on hand) x 175 lbs / 1 (patient's weight) x 1 kg / 2.2 lb (conversion factor) = 700 / 440 = 1.590909 (answer after performing the math) = 1.6 ml (answer rounded off and amount to be given to the patient), then rounding up, you will need 2 vials of the medication.

    hope that helps you get to the answers.
  7. by   ginger58
    To make the Benadryl calculation easier, you're giving 50ml in 15 minutes so there are (4) 15 minutes in an hour so 4 times 50ml=200 ml per hour.:wink2:
  8. by   buterflycf
    Thank you bunches!!!!!

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