why are we technicians? - page 2

I found it interesting that all specialties of nursing on the allnurses.com salary.com link are listed as health care technicians while physicians are only under practitioners. I always thought we... Read More

  1. by   kanzi monkey
    FIGasman,
    I hear ya. And Hopefull/BuddhakOn, I kind of hear you too. But not quite as loudly or clearly. I think it's wonderful that people discover a career that truly motivates them and that they feel passionate about. Nursing is a very particular career choice, because as nurses we deal in the extremes of human existence--life, death, pain, joy, etc. It's not for everybody.
    Nurses have had to overcome tremendous stereotypes and assumptions--and as a historically "women's" profession, many of its trials have paralleled those of the feminist movement (by that I mean the movement that believes women deserve the same resources and opportunities as men, and I won't go into the finer arguments of modern day feminism).

    Today nurses get a lot of flack for demanding respectful treatment--that is, good pay, benefits, safe staffing ratios, etc. Honestly, if I don't get those things, then it is meaningless to me if people say "I have so much respect for you as a nurse." My job is to take care of patients, and to do it well, I understand that I have to be a compassionate person. That's inherent to the position. I chose nursing because I am compassionate, and I care deeply that my patients may experience the best quality of life that is possible for them. And now that I do that, I want to get paid for it, I expect my patients to be safe (in that I'm not too busy with other patients to care for them properly), and I want to have a life of my own that is completely unrelated to nursing. This is not a "calling" for me--it's a profession. I am a human, not an angel.

    I don't think that it is very fair for anyone to question the very foundation of one of your peers professional choices. Perhaps FIGasman actually feels positively about her/his career--just like you will. But it's important to look critically at what you do, and what your role is in the profession that you've chosen. And also look critically at your profession--is it meeting your expectations? We, as nurses, tend to have high standards--are we working in a society, or in environments that enable us to meet our own professional demands? If there is any doubt in society of the absolute necessity of nurses, we risk allowing the profession to slip behind the curve--because hospitals ARE big business, and will happily stop spending money on nurses if society doesn't demand them. And if people don't understand the value of nurses, they won't support them in a way that allows them to completely carry out their role. Nursing is great, but it's reputation is problematic--and that can change. But we have to recognize the problem first.

    And I'm glad you've never heard a bad word about nurses. That's a good sign for the future, I think. But if you ever DO feel disrespected, or that something just isn't working the way you expected, feel free to question it, discuss it. Don't let anyone tell you how you should feel about your profession--that is a totally personal choice. And, as a new grad myself, I'll offer a suggestion: you can learn from ALL nurses--we do learn every day. But I recommend you learn to listen to what they have to say, even if you disagree with it. We all have the right to our opinions, and obviously we have the right to maintain the validity of our experiences.
    Last edit by kanzi monkey on Mar 29, '07
  2. by   FlGasman
    Quote from kanzi monkey
    FIGasman,
    I hear ya. And Hopefull/BuddhakOn, I kind of hear you too. But not quite as loudly or clearly. I think it's wonderful that people discover a career that truly motivates them and that they feel passionate about. Nursing is a very particular career choice, because as nurses we deal in the extremes of human existence--life, death, pain, joy, etc. It's not for everybody.
    Nurses have had to overcome tremendous stereotypes and assumptions--and as a historically "women's" profession, many of its trials have paralleled those of the feminist movement (by that I mean the movement that believes women deserve the same resources and opportunities as men, and I won't go into the finer arguments of modern day feminism).

    Today nurses get a lot of flack for demanding respectful treatment--that is, good pay, benefits, safe staffing ratios, etc. Honestly, if I don't get those things, then it is meaningless to me if people say "I have so much respect for you as a nurse." My job is to take care of patients, and to do it well, I understand that I have to be a compassionate person. That's inherent to the position. I chose nursing because I am compassionate, and I care deeply that my patients may experience the best quality of life that is possible for them. And now that I do that, I want to get paid for it, I expect my patients to be safe (in that I'm not too busy with other patients to care for them properly), and I want to have a life of my own that is completely unrelated to nursing. This is not a "calling" for me--it's a profession. I am a human, not an angel.

    I don't think that it is very fair for anyone to question the very foundation of one of your peers professional choices. Perhaps FIGasman actually feels positively about her/his career--just like you will. But it's important to look critically at what you do, and what your role is in the profession that you've chosen. And also look critically at your profession--is it meeting your expectations? We, as nurses, tend to have high standards--are we working in a society, or in environments that enable us to meet our own professional demands? If there is any doubt in society of the absolute necessity of nurses, we risk allowing the profession to slip behind the curve--because hospitals ARE big business, and will happily stop spending money on nurses if society doesn't demand them. And if people don't understand the value of nurses, they won't support them in a way that allows them to completely carry out their role. Nursing is great, but it's reputation is problematic--and that can change. But we have to recognize the problem first.

    And I'm glad you've never heard a bad word about nurses. That's a good sign for the future, I think. But if you ever DO feel disrespected, or that something just isn't working the way you expected, feel free to question it, discuss it. Don't let anyone tell you how you should feel about your profession--that is a totally personal choice. And, as a new grad myself, I'll offer a suggestion: you can learn from ALL nurses--we do learn every day. But I recommend you learn to listen to what they have to say, even if you disagree with it. We all have the right to our opinions, and obviously we have the right to maintain the validity of our experiences.
    wow, thanks! Very insightful!
  3. by   buddhak0n
    Quote from FlGasman
    Thats very mature and im jewish, maybe ill be a rabbi. And my goal is not to become respected, I AM respected. I was just saying that since I entered Anesthesia school and even nursing school I sure had to do a lot of explaining as to why I didnt just become a dr, which in my mind reflects a lack of respect for what nurses and nursing do and is. Maybe its because im a man, which represents a further slight on women, as if nursing is women's work and less then mens workk which is what a dr does. But this was ignored instead and i was flamed. Don't worry, my feelings arn't hurt, it just stinks to get attacked by those who are supposed to support you. Disagreement is ok, but this is ridiculous.
    I'm not trying to "attack" you just let you know what I think and I just thought you were wasting a whole lot of time on what everybody ELSE thinks about YOU.

    I would support you in whatever you do.. sure... but you've got to move beyond what other people's stereotypes may or may not be about a situation.... To me, sure things in life can be competitive but it's really not about competing or one upmanship in this arena... It's about caring for your patients...

    Hey I'm a guy too and I guess all I'm saying is don't sweat what you perceive to be other people's respect or disrespect... most of the time it's just misperception... other times it doesn't really matter so long AS YOU are happy.
  4. by   FlGasman
    Quote from buddhak0n
    I'm not trying to "attack" you just let you know what I think and I just thought you were wasting a whole lot of time on what everybody ELSE thinks about YOU.

    I would support you in whatever you do.. sure... but you've got to move beyond what other people's stereotypes may or may not be about a situation.... To me, sure things in life can be competitive but it's really not about competing or one upmanship in this arena... It's about caring for your patients...

    Hey I'm a guy too and I guess all I'm saying is don't sweat what you perceive to be other people's respect or disrespect... most of the time it's just misperception... other times it doesn't really matter so long AS YOU are happy.
    Thats all fine and well but I do care about misconceptions about the nursing field, and thats why I vent here. The public needs education. Thanks for telling me not to waste time on what people think. Thats great advice! ????? Why didnt I think of that! Of course hardly anyone would waste time on such things, I think ill be a nudist, its more comfortable, i dont care what people think about that either now!
  5. by   scrubsnhugsRN
    I feel I need to respond to this thread. As far as taking what other people think about you to heart, I suppose at some level allowing it, is a bad thing. But I will say this, it IS going to affect you if you are bombarded by it on a daily bases, by the Physicians, patients or other staff. It will affect you, we do not live in a vacum.
    It is very difficult when you try to teach patients, as your job requires, and as you are qualified to do, and the patients blow you off like you are an idiot, or blately refuse to believe anything you say. When physicians write orders that are ridiculous, because they are trying to make a point. It will take its toll...I dont care who you are. I have come to realize how our profession is so disrespected, I truly dont think I ever realized this before. I am sorry to say at my work, that a bachlors degree dont recieve any additional respect either. I recieved my Associates at an University, not a community college, but does it matter? Nope!! The patients dont care if you have a bachelor nor do the doctors..it is "not a doctorates", if you know what I am saying.

    Bottomline it will affect you when it happens day in a day out. I am proud to be a nurse even "other" people dont have a clue what it takes to be one. I would pay money to see a doctor to work a nurse shift one full day.
  6. by   Feathers
    Why dont we introduce our selves as nurse whatever???? Like "HI this is Dr jones and this is nurse smith? " We should, but we don't becuase of the negative connotation even associated with the word nurse. Instead its Hi Im dr smith and the is jennifer. or Bob. So you are DR smith and this is bob or jennifer.
    All my nurses introduce themselves as nurses. They usually say "Hi I'm so & so & i'll be your nurse for the next x amount of hours." It's done on all shifts, even nocs (my shift).
    Last edit by Feathers on Jan 26, '08
  7. by   TiredMD
    To actually answer the question: the term "practitioner" is historically applied to physicians, though recently some facilities also include NPs and PAs. Think of it as short-hand for "Licensed Independent Practitioner".

    The Army defines it as: "health care provider given privileges (privileged) to diagnose, initiate, alter, or terminate health care treatment regimens"

    That's why nurses are not included under the practitioner label.

    As to why they put you under "technician" I have no idea.

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