What do I tell her? - page 2

Today my girlfriend confided in me regarding a situation she recently went through. I just don't know what to tell her. We are both relatively new nurses (2 years on the job). We work together... Read More

  1. by   NicoleRN07
    Unfortunately for your girlfriend, it is considered abandonment. The best thing she could do is talk with the DON and explain the situation to possibly avoid her contacting the Board of Nursing. If the board happens to be involved already, then I would suggest she consult a lawyer. Hopefully, all will work out for her, and next time she will handle the situation with a little more maturity and professionalism.
  2. by   Katnip
    Quote from HisHands
    I appreciate everyone's input in this. It's scarry to think that she is a brand new nurse and already put her license in jeopardy. But, think about what most 23 year olds are doing these days.... working in bars, or still in college, partying and probably not making the best judgement calls. She's really young. Hypothetically, is it worse if some damage occurs to the patient? I agree that the orientator should hold some responsibility here.

    Thanks again...
    HisHands
    Youth is no excuse. 23 is not that young. If you want the job you have to have the maturity to do the job. People's lives are in nurses' hands every day, and there are nurses even younger than her who understand their responsibilities.

    I do hope she's learned from this and things turn out well.
  3. by   truern
    Quote from HisHands
    I agree that the orientator should hold some responsibility here.

    What responsibility should the orientator hold?? Your friend accepted the admission, had the wherewithall to tell the orientator that she was going to lunch, yet didn't mention the fact the she wasn't returning?? I don't see anything here that the orientation should be responsible for.
  4. by   lever5
    The person being precepted is not responsible, the nurse precepting is responsible for the orientee and the patients. This is why it is such a responsible job to precept new employees. Orientees are often pulled off the floor for classes and photo ID's and such, that is why someone else is always in a position to carry through with the patients.
  5. by   Katnip
    Even if the preceptor went on break, it does not abdicate the nurse's responsibility.

    She's not a new grad, been a nurse for about 2 years. She should have at least known to go to the charge if she had a problem. And she definitely should have known better to walk out on a patient and not come back.
  6. by   GardenDove
    It's totally infantile to just walk off the job like that. For one thing, this precepting two people at a time on her first day of orientation shouldn't have been the end of the world. It's not ideal, but she could have waited till the end of the day to address it and find out if she was actually going to get a better orientation from now on. Obviously, something happened to interfere with that on this particular day, maybe someone's mother suddenly died or something.

    Your friend needs to humble herself to this DON with profuse apologies...
  7. by   HisHands
    Is it normal to have more than one orientee with a preceptor? I've never had to share an orientator before, so I don't know. I can only think that by having two orientees with this poor lady, this facility was setting up for failure.

    Even though my friend "accepted" this admission (ie. Preceptor says, "Do as much as you can and I'll come help you") how can she be solely responsible for this admission since she doesn't know how to do any of this? Why does the preceptor hold no responsibility? Mind you, this was my friends first day. She doesn't know how a chart is set up here. She doesn't know any of the paperwork for admissions, discharges or transports out. She doesn't know how the med carts are set up. She doesn't know squat about this facility. I just think it was unfair that she didn't know how to do anything and suddenly was thrown into a situation to do more than she was capable of doing, and the person who was supposed to be this great resource was nowhere to be found. (She later found out her preceptor left work early to visit her husband in the hospital. My friend didn't even know!)

    I'm not trying to make excuses for my girlfriend or anything. I'm just trying to understand how a situation goes this bad... how does a situation come up that puts a license in jeopardy? I'm just trying to understand how my friend was feeling.

    Please keep the opinions coming
  8. by   HisHands
    By the way, my girlfriend did talk to the DON and apologized for her actions. The DON told her that she was happy my friend didn't end up working at her facility and was generally hateful to her (understandably), but told her that she wouldn't call the state.

    If you look at my friend's employment history, she has never called in to work... comes in on all her off days... and is a strong leader at our current facility. She's generally a good employee.
  9. by   GardenDove
    You friend just walked out without saying anything to anyone? No matter what the inadequacies of the situation were, that's an appalling lack of communication. I don't blame the DON for being PO'd. She needs to buck up and go to the DON hat in hand, and clarify the confusion, taking full responsiblity for her childish response to this situation. She'd better improve her communication skills in the future to avoid these types of misunderstandings. What's she going to do if she doesn't understand a doctors order, not communicate? How is she going to function in nursing if this is her response to a situation?
  10. by   aKyRN81
    "I just think it was unfair that she didn't know how to do anything and suddenly was thrown into a situation to do more than she was capable of doing, and the person who was supposed to be this great resource was nowhere to be found."

    I hate to have to say this, but there will be many, many times in a nursing career that one will feel inadequately prepared, 'in over your head', even frightened. BUT nursing is about responsibility so stalking out, foot stomping, pouting, and/or leaving for lunch and not returning are not acceptable. If the situation is that bad, the answer is to find someone (there must have been another nurse somewhere) of authority to at least inform first before indulging your frustration.
  11. by   truern
    Quote from HisHands
    Ok, so 3:00 rolls around and my girlfriend is fed up. They gave her an admission to do.... then told her preceptor she was going on lunch break (they got off at 7:30pm). Well, she never went back after lunch.
    Quote from HisHands
    Even though my friend "accepted" this admission (ie. Preceptor says, "Do as much as you can and I'll come help you") how can she be solely responsible for this admission since she doesn't know how to do any of this? the person who was supposed to be this great resource was nowhere to be found. (She later found out her preceptor left work early to visit her husband in the hospital. My friend didn't even know!)
    How did your friend know the preceptor left work early if she didn't even come back after lunch?? I think the telling thing here is that your friend was "fed up" even before the admission.
  12. by   Miss Ivy
    A nurse of 2 years is not a new nurse. She should have known better. And no, being 23 does not excuse it at all. I have been in the situation where I have had to share a preceptor for a day. You just have to deal with it the best you can. She should never have left. And she's really lucky that DON did not report her.
  13. by   Mags4711
    Quote from HisHands
    Is it normal to have more than one orientee with a preceptor? I've never had to share an orientator before, so I don't know. I can only think that by having two orientees with this poor lady, this facility was setting up for failure.

    Even though my friend "accepted" this admission (ie. Preceptor says, "Do as much as you can and I'll come help you") how can she be solely responsible for this admission since she doesn't know how to do any of this? Why does the preceptor hold no responsibility? Mind you, this was my friends first day. She doesn't know how a chart is set up here. She doesn't know any of the paperwork for admissions, discharges or transports out. She doesn't know how the med carts are set up. She doesn't know squat about this facility. I just think it was unfair that she didn't know how to do anything and suddenly was thrown into a situation to do more than she was capable of doing, and the person who was supposed to be this great resource was nowhere to be found. (She later found out her preceptor left work early to visit her husband in the hospital. My friend didn't even know!)

    I'm not trying to make excuses for my girlfriend or anything. I'm just trying to understand how a situation goes this bad... how does a situation come up that puts a license in jeopardy? I'm just trying to understand how my friend was feeling.

    Please keep the opinions coming
    No, I've not been in a situation where a preceptor has two orientees that need to be fully precepted. However in your OP you mentioned that the other orientee was on her last day and I'm guessing that the facility/charge RN thought she would only need a buddy and not need someone to be at her side all day. That *is* a situation I've been in. Sometimes staffing is very tight (though that's a cop out to some extent), and if someone is almost off orientation, you have to technically double up. It should be a rare occasion, but it has happened in my career a couple of times (15 yrs). On that note, you can't plan for situations to arise, perhaps the first orientee had quite a few things come up she'd never seen before and that required the preceptor to spend more time with her than originally intended. If that was the case, the preceptor should have said something to the Charge RN or the DON or someone with authority so that your GF didn't have to go through what she did.

    Do I think the DON should have threatened to call the state for abandonment? No. Did your GF abandon her patient(s), YES!
    Because she was on orientation, I do not think she could be held fully accountable for that admit. But she's also NOT a new grad. I don't give a rat's patoot that she's 23 and "young," that's a load of hooey. When I was 17 and had my first job cleaning a furniture store, I knew better than to walk off without telling anyone! That is the crux of this. I don't think your GF should be threatened with her license (thankfully for her the DON isn't going to call the state), but she should be spanked and have her toys taken away for acting like such a child.

    You said your GF found out later that the preceptor left early to visit her own hubby in the hospital? Why is that relevant in any way? I'm guessing she didn't walk off and leave her patients without a nurse!

    I'm sorry if you think I'm being harsh, but I'm sick to death of the way some people treat this profession (actually I'm sick of the lack of work ethic these days). If you get mad, you don't just walk away. People need to take responsibility for their actions, right or wrong.

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