Teas and Native American Medicine

  1. Just curious - my mother's grandparents were citizens of the Cherokee Nation. As I was growing up she would talk about various teas for various ailments.

    Is this common in Native American Culture? I would be curious to read research based on if any of the various types of teas really do relieve symptoms of certain illnesses..... (Raspberry Leaf, Black Cohosh, etc, etc)
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   Gennaver
    Quote from mom and nurse
    Just curious - my mother's grandparents were citizens of the Cherokee Nation. As I was growing up she would talk about various teas for various ailments.

    Is this common in Native American Culture? I would be curious to read research based on if any of the various types of teas really do relieve symptoms of certain illnesses..... (Raspberry Leaf, Black Cohosh, etc, etc)

    Hi,
    I am mixed, (Anishinaabe and various NA and various Euro). From what I have witnessed and heard that were various non-tea plants that were used as a base for teas. Some tree barks during various stages of the year and some leaves of plants and so on. I do not know the time of year exactly and how much to use to prepare the bark-teas but are pretty trusting of their worth.
    Gen
  4. by   mom and nurse
    Gennaver - thanks for your response. That's interesting about bark teas. i'm thinking about trying to research some online nursing journals to see if I see anything on "teas" and "Medicine..... I just thought it would be an interesting topic.
    Last edit by mom and nurse on Dec 2, '06
  5. by   Gennaver
    Quote from mom and nurse
    Gennaver - thanks for your response. That's interesting about bark teas. i'm thinking about trying to research some online nursing journals to see if I see anything on "teas" and "Medicine..... I just thought it would be an interesting topic.
    Hello,
    You may find some under Dogwood tree, there are also some plants but, it is somewhat risky to use them without proper interpretation, even listing them in a research paper for others to read. They are a medicine and like all pharmaceuticals there is risk of improper usage so please advise.
    Gen
  6. by   happy heartsong
    David Winston is a wonderful herbalist and part Cherokee. He has written a few books and teaches classes.
    I am also an herbalist and a homebirth midwife and use herbs in my practice. The plants are superb healers, teaching our bodies, minds and spirits how to be more whole (heal).
  7. by   mom and nurse
    Thanks for your response Happy Heartsong. Perhaps I will be able to locate David Winston's book.
  8. by   happy heartsong
    JT Garrett- The Cherokee Herbal and other books are also good.
    David Winston has a website and sells products. You can google and see. Herbal medicine has seen a resurgence since the 70's and many NA have generously shared what they know.
  9. by   cholul
    Quote from Gennaver
    .... there are also some plants but, it is somewhat risky to use them without proper interpretation, even listing them in a research paper for others to read. They are a medicine and like all pharmaceuticals there is risk of improper usage so please advise.
    Gen
    Thank you so much for posting that word of caution. If anyone is doing multicultural nursing, please watch your patients carefully - especially those from Native American, Latino, and Asian cultures. My own Native American mother nearly killed my father IN the hospital !!! We all used to joke that she was "practicing medicine without a license"... then it turned deadly when he was sick and she was bringing all manner of herbal remedies into the hospital. Combined with what his physicians were giving him, it is a miracle we saved him at all! Needless to say, his physician was not amused and all Mother accomplished was to turn a whole lot of health care providers against Native American healing.

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