Survey: Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortag - page 16

This month's survey Question: Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortage? Please take a minute to take answer our survey and please feel free to reply to... Read More

  1. by   Gromit
    Quote from Rep
    Since language is your outmost concern then I tell you something about us.

    Speaking for the Filipino nurses, we spent four years in nursing schools/clinicals. Our language of instruction is English. The nursing and medical books we used are written by American authors. Therefore, we Filipino nurses including other nationalities whose language of instruction is English are familiar with the type of medical English used in an American hospital environment.

    By the way, the Americans stayed in our country for fifty years and English is our second national language. Nobody has a monopoly on the English language. CNN and Foxnews are breakfast to us.
    Rep, if you'll pardon me, but in my opinion, Filipino nurses are a cut above. I've worked with quite a few (if you live in central Florida, a LOT of the nurses are Filipinos) and all of them are very good, and their language skills are just as you say. But not all foreign nurses learned with medical books written by American authors, or are familiar with medical English used in an American hospital environment, etc. Listening to some of my friends who are nurses from your islands, your nursing curriculum is more difficult than ours is (especially if you compare it to our community college ones (which is where I went. BSN eventually, but not yet), and it shows in their skills. Very good, very proficient. But other foreign places do not use the same kinds of tools. Learning in an english-type environment, with english-based books and settings would prepare you in a most unique way to work in the US. But taking the TOEFL and TSE does not test for medical, and is a poor standard to guage ones' ability to communicate in the medical setting. If they didn't have the advantage of learning their medical training using american books like you did, then they may pass those two tests, but which nurse do YOU think would have a better shot at excelling in the medical environment?
  2. by   Rep
    Quote from fergus51
    Rep, I'm sorry, but I have to tell you that passing an English exam DOES NOT necessarily mean you can communicate in English well enough to practise nursing. I have never seen this as a huge problem with the Phillipino nurses I work with, because as you pointed out they were trained in English, but I have seen it with Asian nurses from HK, mainland China and India. It isn't just about medical terminology either. Some of them had such strong accents that patients and family members couldn't understand them.

    You are right! Passing the English exams do not necessarily means one can communicate in English well enough to practice nursing. But this passing shows that the nurse has the needed language skills to easily assimilate in the working environment.

    Frankly speaking, I am against someone who would led a foreign nurse to work in the unit with language skills problem because it will compromise patient care.

    That is why the US government has require these English exams for every foreign nurses coming to the US.
  3. by   Rep
    Quote from Gromit
    If they didn't have the advantage of learning their medical training using american books like you did, then they may pass those two tests, but which nurse do YOU think would have a better shot at excelling in the medical environment?
    Definitely, I would go for that foreign nurse whose nursing education were taught in English. On that I agree with you.

    You know , we may agree or disagree with our opinions but we can learn a lot from each other.
  4. by   fergus51
    Quote from Rep
    You are right! Passing the English exams do not necessarily means one can communicate in English well enough to practice nursing. But this passing shows that the nurse has the needed language skills to easily assimilate in the working environment.

    Frankly speaking, I am against someone who would led a foreign nurse to work in the unit with language skills problem because it will compromise patient care.

    That is why the US government has require these English exams for every foreign nurses coming to the US.
    I agree with you here. Hospitals should not hire staff that can't function in English. It is a problem with the system. That said, a nurse has the responsibility to ensure she can give safe care. If she can't because of a language problem, it IS her responsibility to do something about it and not try to pawn it off as just a problem with the system.
  5. by   jesl
    I feel that we should first look at our situation here in the US as to why it is there is a shortage to start with. I have been a travel nurse for 4 yrs now and have no problem getting a contract with good money so why can't administration sit down with the nursing staff and give them respect, a good wage and a decent schedule I don;t think we need to support other countries with the United States money anymore then we already do!
    Quote from brian
    This month's survey Question:

    Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortage?

    Please take a minute to take answer our survey and please feel free to reply to this topic to post any comments that you may have on the topic.
  6. by   leslie :-D
    i did not read this entire thread but based on the question alone, i would have to state that we need to address and resolve the issues of the nursing shortage from within rather than recruit to outsiders first.
  7. by   hospicemom
    Quote from mfdteacher
    Hospital Administrators, Nursing organizations, and Nursing schools are all well aware that there is no shortage. Nurses are working in other fields everywhere, they just refuse to work in hospitals. Short staffing, cost cutting, being bought and sold by "hospital corporations", being berated about the budget, productivity, and "Oh, by the way, can you work overtime", all contribute to nurses leaving hospitals. What about 12 hour shifts which have been proven in umpteen studies to contribute to errors and poor care? Do the hospitals really believe that we don't understand that two 12 hour shifts means paying one less set of benefits for the third shift that would work 8 hour shifts? We do not need foreign nurses, we need to address the problems imposed by the system currently in place. As long as the dollar is more important than the patient, we'll never go back to the hospital.
    I am a floor RN And I can say that we would NOT have the shortage at the hospital in the way we do if it wasnt for cutting costs. They take the number of patients, the acuity level and then put it all in a computer that tells how many RNs LPNs and CNAs we get, which is NEVER enough....it doesnt take into consideration admissions or that one pt who is on the bedpan every 5 minuts...or if we havea few patients getting blood. It gets so frustrating I could spit.
  8. by   UCLARN
    what a bogus percentage. Don't you think you are grossly exagerrating. Now as an RN, don't you have the ability to write them up (incident report) if you see fit?


    [QUOTE=fourevern4alwayz]
    Quote from brian
    This month's survey Question:

    Should nurses from other countries be recruited to aid in the nursing shortage?

    Where I work, there are a lot of conflicts between a majority of the workers because most of the nursing staff are Phillipinos and it creates tension in the workplace b/c there is favoritism when there is a Phillipino supervisor at night, they all get to slack off and stand around b.s.'n in their own language, and when someone brought these problems up to the supervisor, they acted as if they were offended, but then what did they continue doing???? No not all of them are acting this way, but 98% are, and God forbid anyone says anything about it. It wouldn't bother me so much if they would just stop ignoring the rules of our facility and be more professional and work more. :uhoh21:
  9. by   UCLARN
    it's hard to get inactive nurses to coming back. they left because i assume conditions sucked. as for disabled nurses, depending of course on severity, yes they should recruit them, but not as staff nurses.


    Quote from cwernc
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    foreign nurses are not the issue, our lack of working nurses is. there are nurses brought over fronm the phillapines that are here for a year, all expenses paid, prior to them starting jobs. they are supported by the hospitals they will work for. why is no one acting on inactive nurses? why is no one looking at disabled nurses. i am disabled and work full time from a chair.
  10. by   Sheri257
    Quote from UCLARN
    It's hard to get inactive nurses to coming back. They left because I assume conditions sucked.
    There are about 500,000 inactive licensed RN's, but lousy working conditions may be only part of the reason. 70 percent of them are over age 50 and may not be able to work. In the last survey, retirements and deaths jumped from 25,000 to 175,000. So a lot of it could be age as well.

  11. by   DANRN2000
    I plead ignorance! So I have a few questions?

    1. Who does the recruiting? (?Goverment, Hosp, Agency, Headhunters, HMO's, other)
    2. Are they paid at present RN wages?
    3. Are they "servants" to someone or some orginization that has funded their travel? (many immigrants are required to "pay off" their relocation)
    Just wondering.

    Dan
  12. by   Rep
    Quote from lizz
    There are about 500,000 inactive licensed RN's, but lousy working conditions may be only part of the reason. 70 percent of them are over age 50 and may not be able to work. In the last survey, retirements and deaths jumped from 25,000 to 175,000. So a lot of it could be age as well.

    Just want to add an info regarding of nurses' age here in the Philippines. Majority of the nurses here are between 22 to 45 years of age.
  13. by   tantalus
    I agree that bringing in nurses from overseas is not the real long term answer..the "shortage" is global.

    That said, I'm from UK and I'm trying to move to AZ because I feel I can have a better life there for my family and myself....that's all there is to it...it's a small world and I for one wish to take advantage of that.

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