Staffing issues-yes Again

  1. I work in a Veterans Long Term care facility. We have a capacity of 301 residents that are spread out on 6 different units. We have just found out that our staffing is going to be cut. Right now we have (on a "good" day) 16 licensed, and 22 CNAs, for a total of 38 staff. They are going to cut us to 30. Yes, that is still a 10:1 ratio, but the way our facility is laid out (3 units upstairs and 3 downstairs with our Alzheimers unit) this is not going to work. What I am concerned about, when the lawsuits start coming, (and I am sure they will),is my license in Jeopardy as a Supervisor
    even though the staffing is mandated by the Health Department?
    I hate the thought of leaving the facility but I hate the thought of standing in front of the Nursing Board even more!
    Know what I mean???
    •  
  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   gvar
    Have you thought of notifying your local veterans agencies, (even anonomously if nec.) of the staffing change. They may be able to do your fight for you.
    I would certainly make sure that my concerns were in writing and a copy placed in my personnel file for when the complaints start rolling in.
    Ultimately, I would be looking for other work just because I don't see how I could give adequate care much less the appropriate amount of care that any patient but expecially our vets deserve.

    Good luck, let us know how this works out.
  4. by   Charles S. Smith, RN, MS
    Originally posted by SHEILA C
    I work in a Veterans Long Term care facility. We have a capacity of 301 residents that are spread out on 6 different units. We have just found out that our staffing is going to be cut. Right now we have (on a "good" day) 16 licensed, and 22 CNAs, for a total of 38 staff. They are going to cut us to 30. Yes, that is still a 10:1 ratio, but the way our facility is laid out (3 units upstairs and 3 downstairs with our Alzheimers unit) this is not going to work. What I am concerned about, when the lawsuits start coming, (and I am sure they will),is my license in Jeopardy as a Supervisor
    even though the staffing is mandated by the Health Department?
    I hate the thought of leaving the facility but I hate the thought of standing in front of the Nursing Board even more!
    Know what I mean???
    Actually, if your facility is part of the VA system your guidelines come from the Federal level. I think it will be very difficult for anyone to litigate against the Federal Government. Talk with your Chief Nurse openly about the ramifications of this decision to see what is really going on. If the guidelines came down from Washington, the Chief Nurse's hands may also be tied. Worth a shot. And.....if all else fails, ask your local Veterans' Association to take a look at it. Good luck...

    chas
  5. by   RNed
    Find a new job and quit the present one. The more nurses quit when staffing issues arise the quicker the fix to staffing problems.

    You do not sacrifice your nurisng license for the agency or the patients. You can continue to take care of patients in another setting and provide for them.

    If you lose your license do to your present employers staffing issues, you do no favors for the patients at that facility or any facility.

    Of coarse, quiting is easy to recommend from the armchair position. You must do what is best for you.
  6. by   Jenny P
    First, I'd check to see who makes the staffing guidelines for your facility. If it is the VA system and the Federal government that regulates it, I'd write letters of concern to them. Thirdly, I think I would go to the public about it via the VFW, DAV, American Legion, etc. in their newsletters. I'd ask them to write to their Senators and Congressmen and let them know that this is unsafe. I think right now the American public has a lot of sympathy for veterans and would raise cain with these ratios.
    Only after I'd done these things and not recieved any satisfaction would I quit and move on.
  7. by   Teshiee
    Why tolerate something that could put you at risk. Do you think that hospital would back you up if something goes wrong? The irst thing a lawyer would ask is why would you work in these conditions knowing you put your patient and your license at risk? enough said. I use to work LTC and I refuse to do it. I work very hard for my license why should I sacrifice what I earned so hard for? "NOT"

close