Pandemic News/Awareness. - page 30

I had to close the other panflu thread as it was way too long, and becoming unreadable. I am starting this one with info on the agenda of this meeting tomorrow in Congress. I am linking to... Read More

  1. by   indigo girl
    Quote from spacey

    What kinds of personal preparations have you made for youself and your (hypothetical) family?..........food/water/masks/meds/alternative meds etc/ammunition (just kidding.....kinda) Also....would you have a "pet" bird ....and when would you determine that was too big of a risk?
    It is easier for me to answer your questions, in small increments as this week is a very busy one for me.

    My personal preparations are for 3 month of food and water storage, and whatever else I think that my family will need.

    Pets, should remain indoors as much as possible. If wild birds are infected, you do not want your pet cat carrying one home. A pet bird is indoors and not a risk in my opinion.

    There is much useful information at this link to help you start preparing your family for an all hazards approach.

    http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/index.php

    More later...
  2. by   indigo girl
    To continue Spacey,

    "I wonder a few things about your personal beliefs, plans and current situation. (If you don't mind giving us some insight into the preparations of someone who is well informed) Do you currently work in a hospital / direct care setting? Have you found a way to educate your city or state and how effective has that been? How would you personally determine it was time to remove your (hypothetical) children from public school? "

    I currently work in direct care in LTC in another state via agency. I find that none of these privately owned businesses, because that is what they are, are prepared in any way for most emergencies let alone pandemic influenza. They have inadequate PPE, and little of it, no knowledge of the problem or the logistics involved. There is a state wide plan for LTC to prepare for pandemic influenza, but none are following it. I will not be working in that setting should a pandemic occur. I am willing to help if adequate PPE is provided most probably in a setting such as a gymnasium or armory. I recognize that the standard of care will of necessity be lowered.

    I have had some conversations with the head of the Bioterrorism Unit, and the Dept of Health. They seem to be most interested in an all hazards approach. These plans are somewhat amorphous and leave much to the imagination.

    Removing children from school will be different in every state. I believe that most parents will act to take their kids out if they even suspect that there is any risk whether the school board wants to close the school or not.

    My personal belief about the risk of a pandemic? I know that one will occur because these are naturally occurring events . They always happen. When it happens, if it is severe, many will die, mostly young people. We will not be able to prevent this. We could get lucky, and have a less severe pandemic, but who wants to gamble?

    I believe it is our responsibility to prepare our families and our communities. No is going to take care of us in that kind of national emergency. We have to take care of ourselves.
  3. by   indigo girl
    From Effect Measure, reprinted with permission of the authors.

    The Editors of Effect Measure are senior public health scientists and practitioners. Paul Revere was a member of the first local Board of Health in the United States (Boston, 1799). The Editors sign their posts "Revere" to recognize the public service of a professional forerunner better known for other things.

    Africa, flu and a meeting in three years
    Category: Bird flu
    Posted on: June 20, 2007 6:53 AM, by revere

    Many people have the impression the bird flu menace has receded. Much of this is based on its lack of media visibility. I don't blame the media. There is a lot happening in the world, editors get bird flu fatigue just as the rest of us do, and there doesn't seem to be a lot to say that hasn't been said before. Whichy of course is the problem. Things haven't changed.

    Consider Africa:

    Some African nations are experiencing a rapid spread of the H5N1 virus in poultry while a lack of equipped public health labs, customs surrounding chickens and poor surveillance hamper pandemic plans, a conference on the flu heard yesterday in Toronto.
    In just over a year, Avian flu or the H5N1 virus, arrived in Africa and spread to nine countries, three of which now have human cases, said Dr. Stella Chungong, a medical officer with the World Health Organization Influenza Programme.

    In Nigeria, the H5N1 virus first infected poultry about a year ago and has now spread to 22 out of 36 states.

    There has been one human death from H5N1 in Lagos, the largest city in Nigeria. In all of Africa, it's believed 38 people have become sick with the virus in the last year, according to Chungong, but it's unclear whether that's an accurate number because surveillance is poor. (Tanya Talaga, The Toronto Star)

    That's just a bit of the news from the Options for the Control of Influenza VI Conference where 1500 flu-obsessed scientists are meeting in Toronto. This meeting happens every three years.

    With luck, there will be another one in three years. With luck. Three years is a long time for a virus that can make millions of copies of itself on the scale of hours.
  4. by   indigo girl
    Czech Republic:

    http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2007/0...-bird-flu.html

    Quote from http://www.ceskenoviny.cz/news/index_view.php?id=258563
    Prague- A bird flu virus has emerged in a poultry flock for the first time in the Czech republic, the State Veterinary Administration said.

    The virus was confirmed in a turkey flock in Usti nad Orlice, east Bohemia, this afternoon. Part of the flock of 6,000 birds have died. The results of control checks that are expected on Thursday will confirm what type of virus has appeared.
  5. by   indigo girl
    Ghana, 6/19/07:

    http://crofsblogs.typepad.com/h5n1/2...hit_by_th.html
    Quote from http://www.myjoyonline.com/news/200706/5850.asp
    About 1100 birds have been destroyed following the discovery of another case of the Bird flu disease at the border town of Aflao near Lome.

    Officials of the Veterinary Service Department detected the virus after a poultry farmer in a community at Aflao took his sick birds to the Veterinary laboratory here in Accra to be tested. The birds reportedly started dying since last Wednesday but did not show any signs of the disease.
  6. by   indigo girl
    Something to think about, maybe H5N1 is not the virus we should be most concerned about:

    http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2007/0...is-threat.html

    Quote from http://www.upi.com/Health_Business/Analysis/2007/06/19/analysis_bird_flu_fears_reignited/5905/
    "When you have to hospitalize someone for respiratory illness in the U.K., where hospital beds are hard to allocate, then the person has a serious illness," said Jonathan Nguyen-Van-Tam, a senior lecturer at Public Health Laboratory Services in London.

    "In this outbreak, we had four people who tested positive for H7 influenza strain, and three of them were hospitalized," he told United Press International. "One person was a candidate for intensive care before he finally came around.
  7. by   indigo girl
    A 28 year old woman died of avian flu in Vietnam today. She was the second death in two weeks:

    http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/sho...74&postcount=2
  8. by   indigo girl
    Why were they thinking that this virus was just going to go away?

    http://www.recombinomics.com/News/06.../Czech_BF.html


    Positive diagnosis in the Czech Republic, H5N1 confirmed:

    http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2007/0...irms-h5n1.html

    http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/sho...42&postcount=7
  9. by   indigo girl
    Infected money, who knew?

    http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2007/0...sneeze-at.html

    I remember reading in John Barry's The Great Influenza,
    that people would drop their coins into a jar of disinfectant outside
    of the little grocery store, and the store owners would pass goods
    out to them with as little contact as possible. They made no mention
    of paper money.
  10. by   indigo girl
    Reprinted with permission from the authors at Effect Measure

    The Editors of Effect Measure are senior public health scientists
    and practitioners. Paul Revere was a member of the first local
    Board of Health in the United States (Boston, 1799). The Editors
    sign their posts "Revere" to recognize the public service of a
    professional forerunner better known for other things.


    New drugs for flu. But what about some old ones?
    Category: Antivirals * Big Pharma * Bird flu
    Posted on: June 21, 2007 7:00 AM, by revere

    The prospect of a influenza pandemic has concentrated the
    minds of vaccine makers. There has been a lot of new
    research and development on newer, faster and cheaper ways
    to make flu vaccines. The antiviral field hasn't been quite as
    active, although now things seem to be picking up. Until now the
    antivirals (all four of them!) have been in two main classes, the
    old M2 inhibitors (adamantanes) and the newer neuraminidase
    inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir; and waiting in the wings,
    peramivir). Now we are hearing about new drug targets:

    One of the promising things about the work is that the drugs
    and drug targets that are in the pipeline would diversify the
    number of classes of flu drugs if they are successfully brought
    to market. That, in turn, would lower the risk posed by drug
    resistance.
    [snip]

    Later this week, scientists will present an update on work to
    bring to market a new drug, provisionally called T705, which
    targets the polymerase protein. [Dr. Frederick Hayden of WHO]
    said Phase 2 clinical trials will begin in Japan later this year.

    [snip]

    Dr. Robert Krug, of the Institute for Cellular and Molecular
    Biology at the University of Texas at Austin, reported on finding
    a drug target on the non-structural protein of the virus. A drug
    target is a site on a protein created by the virus that could be
    neutralized by the right chemical molecule.

    Krug reported that his lab had screened molecules that
    might be used against the target, and have come up with a
    good "hit." But he cautioned that even if the work goes well,
    it could be five years
    before a drug could be developed, tested and marketed.

    The non-structural or NS1 protein of influenza makes an
    attractive target for a drug because it does not change from
    virus to virus, unlike other parts of flu viruses.
    (Helen Branswell, Canadian Press)

    New classes of drugs mean there are more options if
    a virus manages to escape by developing resistance. They
    also may work better or be useful in combination with a drug
    using another mechanism. It could also be that none of the new
    drugs will be of any help in managing or slowing a pandemic but
    still find an important use in treating individual cases.

    While we are talking about new drugs, however, it
    is somewhat disappointing not to see more information on
    the utility of a class of old drugs, the statins (see here,
    here and here). Statins are cheap, plentiful and have a fairly
    good safety profile.

    The statins are used for their cholesterol lowering feature but
    seem to have other effects as well. Now a paper on another
    cholesterol lowering drug, gemfibrozil, is also showing an ability
    to protect against the lethal effects of influenza infection
    (Budd et al., Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2007 Jun 11). Survival
    against H2N2 in mice increased from 26% to 52% after an
    intraperitonealinjection of gemfibrozil 4 to 10 days
    after intranasal inoculation with the virus. Maybe we should
    be looking at the cholesterol connection a little closer?

    The new drugs under development will have to go through an
    intense process of safety and efficacy testing. Meanwhile we
    also have drugs like the statins and gemfibrozil that are available
    and approved and could be brought into service immediately in
    the event of a pandemic. No big bucks here. These are drugs off
    patent and not hugely profitable.

    But wouldn't it be useful to be investigating their utility a little
    more avidly? Or am I missing something?
  11. by   sediaz
    Dear Indigo,
    I'm a fourth semester nursing student and am taking my Trends in Nursing class. We have to do a presentation and I decided to focus on the respirators that nurses would be wearing while caring for patients in respiratory distress during a Pandemic. I've been reading the posts here and visiting the sites that you reference.

    Thank you for making me aware that this Pandemic is for real. I hope to become involved in helping my hospital/community prepare for thie inevitablity of this.
  12. by   indigo girl
    Quote from sediaz
    Dear Indigo,
    I'm a fourth semester nursing student and am taking my Trends in Nursing class. We have to do a presentation and I decided to focus on the respirators that nurses would be wearing while caring for patients in respiratory distress during a Pandemic. I've been reading the posts here and visiting the sites that you reference.

    Thank you for making me aware that this Pandemic is for real. I hope to become involved in helping my hospital/community prepare for thie inevitablity of this.
    Sediaz, just remember, that it hasn't happened yet, though the threat is real.

    Here is a link to get you started:
    http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/for...lay.php?f=1175
  13. by   indigo girl
    Tamiflu resistance in Idonesia? Considering how often it used there, should we be
    surprised if this turns out to be true?

    http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2007/0...indonesia.html

    Quote from http://www.canada.com/nationalpost/news/story.html?id=98996ead-8fb7-4122-a320-2c4ca63c458c&k=6658
    TORONTO (CP) - An Australian researcher says H5N1 avian flu viruses from Indonesia
    are markedly less susceptible to the antiviral drug Tamiflu than a previous line of the H5N1
    family of viruses.

    Jennifer McKimm-Breschkin says laboratory testing shows the viruses from Indonesia
    are 20 to 30 times less susceptible to the drug as compared to H5N1 viruses that circulated
    in Cambodia a couple of years ago.

    McKimm-Breschkin, who's attending a conference on infectious diseases in Toronto, says the findings are not good news.

    And she says they may help to explain the high death toll from H5N1 in Indonesia, where 80
    of 100 patients have died of the disease.
    Last edit by indigo girl on Jun 22, '07

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