Migrazone and nursing

  1. Hi

    I've read some posts about pain meds being a problem both in nursing and nursing school (in terms of not wanting nurses/students to be on these medications while doing patient care). The most I can find on Migrazone (for migraines) is it has a "sedative" in it. Anyone have an idea if it's something the 'powers above' wouldn't want a nurse/student nurse taking?

    I tried doing some searches, both on the forums here and the net but I
    perhaps don't know the right place to search!

    Thanks
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   Noryn
    I always believe in being up front and honest about any questions you have with your employer or school. In my experience they are usually very understanding. That will save so much grief and frustration in the long run. You dont want to be halfway through nursing school only to have to leave in the middle because of an issue.

    The answer to your question really depends on you. A lot of people I have treated with migraines are in such pain there is no way they could function as a nurse during this pain. That isnt to say you cant be a nurse if you have migraines--a lot of nurses do. How often and severe are your headaches? Are you on other medications? How does Migrazone affect you? I think these questions and others will be something you and your doctor will need to talk about.

    I may be wrong but ultimately I think you are responsible for your actions even if you are on medications that may sedate you. I have seen people be arrested for driving under the influence while being on prescribed medications. Luckily I dont have to take medication on a regular basis but when I did have some dental work done I was placed on Lortab, which I took only when I called in.

    Migrazone isnt an extremely strong pain reliever/sedative but again it all depends on your medical history and how you react to it.
  4. by   rjflyn
    Having delt with migraines for a number of years I can say your going to have more problems with the headache its self with work than with this med. It is one of the first line drugs that doctors try. A first I didn't know what it was, but after searching its also called Midrin. Personally and professionally I can tell you if it works good for you, but more often than not it is useless, your better off trying Excedrin its cheaper.

    As far a worrying about the sedation- having talked with a neurologist the best treatment for migraine other than prevention actually it to induct sedation to allow one to sleep uninterrupted for 8-10 hrs.

    RJ
    Last edit by rjflyn on Oct 28, '05
  5. by   sjrn85
    There are so many better abortive meds for migraine, why anyone still bothers with Midrin/Migrazone amazes me.

    Have you tried Imitrex/Relpax/Maxalt? These meds don't cause sedation and are very effective.

    In any case, if you're honest about meds in a pre-employment/nursing school admission physical and can provide proof of valid Rx's, you should be OK. If you're already working/in school, it's up to you if you want to tell your manager/nursing program. Personally, if you got through the physical with no problems, I'd say keep the details to yourself. Not everyone is understanding about this sort of thing. And if the meds affect your ability to work, even if your manager/instructors know about it, that's not going to help you...impairment is impairment.
  6. by   Jolie
    Quote from sjrn85
    There are so many better abortive meds for migraine, why anyone still bothers with Midrin/Migrazone amazes me.

    Have you tried Imitrex/Relpax/Maxalt? These meds don't cause sedation and are very effective.

    Unfortunately, there are those of us for whom these drugs don't work! I have 2 little kids, so taking a sedating drug for a migraine is not always possible. I have tried 3 or 4 of these newer drugs, and not a one of them worked for me, just prolonged the agony of a migraine until I finally gave up and took my Fiorinal and Codeine anyway.

    As much as I hate it, narcotics and sedatives are the only meds that have ever been effective for my migraines.
  7. by   sjrn85
    I realize that. Midrin, for the most part, just really isn't effective. If Fiorinal w/ codeine works for you, more power to you. As long as you don't need to take it frequently, it should be fine; I'm sure you know that using it frequently causes rebound effect.
  8. by   Catsmeow
    Hi

    Thanks so much for the responses. The Midrin does work for me right now, but I've only tried it for a few months. It also works on the tension headaches behind my eye that don't quite become full blown migraines. My migraines *tend* (not always) to come on in response to "chemical smells" (perfume, industrial chemicals) so I usually can head them off fast enough that it doesn't become the in-bed-sick kind.

    I'm not in nursing school yet (applying next semester) and my main concern is I don't want any concerns. LOL I don't want to have to bring up any 'problem' issues to the nursing school, the stress of that to me is enough to make me consider another option (as someone mentioned) that wouldn't cause a problem. I'm just wasn't sure if this is a strong enough a drug to raise any red flags on a drug test, or if it's a narcotic or what. (I don't feel impaired or sleepy when I take it, there's a very slight calming effect, like the opposite of drinking a cup of coffee maybe.) I was trying to find out what exactly Midrin was considered in those terms but I can't find more detailed drug information than what's put out generically on websites for-the-average-reader, if that makes sense.

    Thanks so much for the responses, it helped tremedously. I'll keep looking further into it and maybe chat at the Dr. before I apply. That'll be a funny conversation... "Dr., the medicine works but I don't wanna fail a drug test, can I have something else?" LOL
  9. by   Jolie
    With drug screenings, you have the opportunity (in advance of the test) to provide a written list of your OTC and RX medications, so if any of those substances are detected, you have already accounted for them. With prescription drugs, you may be asked to produce a current RX bottle or script from your physician to verify that you are "authorized" to take them. So, a medication for which you have a legitimate RX should not pose a problem on a drug screen.

    That said, I understand your concern. I use Fiorinal with Codeine for migraines, and am about to enroll in a refresher course which requires a drug screen. I wonder if I would raise fewer eyebrows if I requested an RX for regular Tylenol with Codeine, rather than using Fiorinal, which contains a barbiturate. Of course, my concern relates only to the drug screen. If I have a migraine which requires any medication, I would not be fit to work anyway.
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I have been successfully treated with Relpax for my horrid, life-stopping migraines. They don't sedate me at all---but they do cause my heart to "pound" temporarily. This is a normal side effect I am willing to endure for the relief this med has brought me.
  11. by   TypicalFish
    Quote from Catsmeow
    Hi

    Thanks so much for the responses. The Midrin does work for me right now, but I've only tried it for a few months. It also works on the tension headaches behind my eye that don't quite become full blown migraines. My migraines *tend* (not always) to come on in response to "chemical smells" (perfume, industrial chemicals) so I usually can head them off fast enough that it doesn't become the in-bed-sick kind.

    I'm not in nursing school yet (applying next semester) and my main concern is I don't want any concerns. LOL I don't want to have to bring up any 'problem' issues to the nursing school, the stress of that to me is enough to make me consider another option (as someone mentioned) that wouldn't cause a problem. I'm just wasn't sure if this is a strong enough a drug to raise any red flags on a drug test, or if it's a narcotic or what. (I don't feel impaired or sleepy when I take it, there's a very slight calming effect, like the opposite of drinking a cup of coffee maybe.) I was trying to find out what exactly Midrin was considered in those terms but I can't find more detailed drug information than what's put out generically on websites for-the-average-reader, if that makes sense.

    Thanks so much for the responses, it helped tremedously. I'll keep looking further into it and maybe chat at the Dr. before I apply. That'll be a funny conversation... "Dr., the medicine works but I don't wanna fail a drug test, can I have something else?" LOL

    I have migraines, and have since I was 14 or so. I have tried Imitrex-yuck, and more recently, Relpax. Relpax worked for awhile, in addition to making me feel very weird, and giving me the post migraine-medication "let down" effect(feeling tired), it wasn't as effective after awhile. As of yet, I haven't taken anything more than motrin while working. I do however, closely watch my triggers and avoid them. I stay hydrated,exercise and try (HAH!) to get enough sleep. I also read a very good article in Natural Health magazine that reported some studies that link migraines to decreased calcium and magnesium levels; since then I have increased my calcium and magnesium intake, with some positive results. While I still get some aural symptoms and what I call a "light" migraine (ie Bearable); I have yet (knock on wood) to get the someone-is-trying-to-push-my-right-eye-out-p*ke-my-brains-out-why-is-
    everyone-yelling? type of migraine-this has been over 7mos. I have a migraine light right now as I type this, but I''ll go to bed early, and prolly be okay at work tomorrow. best of luck

    A website to check out http://www.migraines.org/

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