LPN REGRETS?

  1. I RECENTLY PASSED MY STATE BOARDS FOR MY LPN LICENSE.THE MAJORITY OF THE CLASS I GRADUATED
    WITH ARE GOING ON TO AN RN PROGRAM.I DECIDED NOT TO CONTINUE AT THIS TIME BECAUSE I FEEL SO BURNED OUT WITH SCHOOL - I ALSO HAVE A FAMILY TO TAKE CARE OF. NOW I HAVE SOME REGRET AS TO TAKING TIME OFF AND NOT PURSUING MY RN. PEOPLE TREAT ME AS IF AN LPN ISN'T A "REAL" NURSE LIKE AN RN. ARE THERE LPN'S OUT THERE THAT ARE HAPPY BEING LPN'S? SO FAR, I HAVE FOUND THE JOB MARKET VERY DEPRESSING.IS THERE ANYONE OUT THERE WHO TOOK TIME OFF BETWEEN LPN AND RN SCHOOL? I WOULD LIKE ANY FEEDBACK!! THANKS!!
    •  
  2. 31 Comments

  3. by   cofeub
    julie
    i was an LPN for 10 years before i went back to school for my RN. i just graduated and all i can say is that one of the biggest reasons i went back was because i got no respect from my coworkers, the majority of who were RNs. i can understand you taking time off but i can tell you from experience you will only get more frustrated the longer you wait to go back.
  4. by   All most a real Nurse
    Julie, I've been an LPN for ten years. I am
    now working on getting my RN, because I am tired of getting paid less and doing the same
    job as an RN. I moved from the West coast to
    the East coast and have been told that LPN's
    are referred to as "little play nurses, where
    RN's are Real Nurses". Talk about getting
    mad! You need to work, and get some experience, plus make some money for now, in
    a year see if you like nursing, then explore
    the option of going on to school. Good Luck
  5. by   scoutgirl17
    Im apologize for all the rns out there who demean LPNs. Im an RN who has worked with LPNS for all of my 14 years of nursing and find you guys invaluable. You are capable of performing many of the jobs RNs do but I feel
    new LPNs lack good assessment skills. But LPNs on the job for a few years soon aquire these skills. I would take an LPN with a years experience over a new grad RN anyday.
    Take some time off, and then maybe start by taking a course or two towards your rn degree. But if you do go back for your RN go for a BSN. You will find many hospitals VNAs
    and home health orgs looking for a minimum
    of BSN. Also many hospitals are requiring certifications for specialty areas aand now I believe you need a BSN to go for these.
    Good luck!!!
  6. by   pietem
    Be proud of what you are.

    [This message has been edited by pietem (edited 08-30-98).]
  7. by   pietem
    I was an LPN for a short time and then went on. But I must say I have worked with many LPN's who can run rings around some RN's. Therefore be proud of what you are and when you have a chance go on to school. Have no idea where you are but you can come and work for me anytime. I have some GREAT LPN's working for me.
  8. by   Julie2356
    to pietem:

    I live in the west and the area where I live has a glut of nurses right now - therefore, the job market is terrible for LPN's. But, thanks for the vote of confidence - I graduated with honors, but as an LPN I guess it doesn't make a difference? I would love to hear from you or anyone else!!!
  9. by   Sandra Egger
    HANG IN THERE, AND BELIEVE IN YOURSELF!
    I have been an LPN for30 years and when I graduated from nursing school, I was told we (LPN's) would be phased out within 10 years. Slowly but surely, this is coming true, in one context. That being, that the experience and expertise of LPN's is downgraded by the medical community. I have worked on both coasts, as well as New Orleans, Americus, Ga.; and Arkansas. I've worked in ICU/CCU, BEFORE it was popular (in Philadelphia,Pa., and Americus, Ga.). I've worked in ER, Med/Surg, L&D, and Recovery room, in hospitals. I've worked as office nurse for an internist who specialized in coronary care (in Little Rock), a 5 physician clinic(in San Jose, Ca.), and as head nurse of an alcohol/drug acute care hospital(in Morgan Hill, Ca.). Along with these experiences, I have done private duty with cases that were very unpopular with my peers. At 52, along with many personal tragic happenings in my life, I've decided against furthering my nursing career. My most recent endeavor was to train CNA's in my community for home health, nursing home and as a "leg-up" for students who had visions of becoming nurses, but who weren't sure. Due to lack of community response, and my lack of business knowledge, I had to close my doors in Dec.,1997. In spite of this failur, I have pride in the fact that I had a 100% pass rate among my students who completed my course. And, hopefully, those who went on will find a rewarding life in nursing. Don't give up, you are a very valuable person, and God made you a nurse for a reason. Happiness, Sandra

  10. by   Julie2356
    Thankyou, Sandra, for your valuable insight and knowledge. Hearing from you and others really has been a boost for me - I have to admit I feel like I'll never find a job where I will feel worthwhile and respected. I've wanted to be a nurse all of my life, however, I wasn't prepared for the prejudice towards LPN's!?!
  11. by   Gail Taves
    I am an "older nurse". I am planning on retiring in 2 1/2 yrs, as an LPN. I love my work as a hands on caretaker. I would trade it for nothing. I work in a long term care facility, have been there several years. The RN's come to me for help frequently. I assist w/staffing for the facility. My opinions are regarded highly in our facility. But I will admit, I had to really work hard for my present position. I make jokes about being a "Little Peon Nurse" (LPN) but no one takes me seriously in this respect. What I am saying is this" Be proud of who you are and what you are. You had to work at it to get where you are. Don't ever feel less than the best. Because LPN's ARE THE BEST. We work harder at our jobs, take our positions more seriously, and after all, we are the ones whom the ultimate responsibility falls on, as we are usually the ones with the "hands on" care. Stay proud."
  12. by   a
    hi I am an LPN and I believe all nurses make a difference. At my hospital the CNAs are also very caring and contribute greatly to many patients well being. I am on a waiting list for lpn to Rn transition but I love my career that I have now. I am going back to school also to make the money I deserve. I have only been an LPN since May and I love my career. I'm sure you are a wonderful nurse and you should just take your time with school. Bye the way I was wondering if you or anyone else knows of any nursing organizations or conferences for LPNs? GOOD LUCK!!!!!!!
  13. by   Shelby
    In responding to "a"'s question regarding LPN
    associations, etc: There is a national association for LPN/LVN's to join - it's called the National Association for Practical Nurse Education and Service, Inc. (NAPNES) which has been devoted to LPN/LVN issues, concerns, and education. To contact NAPNES, call (301) 588-2491 or write: NAPNES
    1400 Spring Street, Suite 330, Silver Spring,
    Maryland 20910.
  14. by   NC nurse
    Wow, did Sandra E. say it all!! I too opted not to go for my RN and heard all the threats of the "phase out". Now LPN's are greatly needed here in NC. There are sign-on bonuses everywhere. I chose to take a 2 yr hiatus and upon reentry saw the respect that I had missed doing odd jobs. I did however stay out of hospitals, it can be too back-biting if there lacks control. I saw home health care pays much better and training wonderful and a great supportive team-RN"s and LPN's, so, if you're feeling lack of value, perhaps a change of environment/people is what is the needed remedy. Doctor's offices also have a resurgence of LPN's, after having hired CMA's. I guess we are here to stay!! Give it time, and don't be hard on yourself.

close