Jewish patients: End of Life practices - page 3

by Girlygirl69 4,157 Views | 26 Comments

This is not meant to be offensive but a serious question. Not to generalize, but in my experience, why do Jewish families agree to all and any extreme measures to preserve life even in the face of obvious suffering of the... Read More


  1. 7
    Quote from mazy

    Most Rabbis are open to discussion about the faith to others who are genuinely interested. I'm sure that if you can catch up with them at a quiet moment, they will be happy to talk to you about these questions.

    Along this line, you might also consider emailing rabbis from different denominations on this topic.

    However I will caution you about "Messianic" Judaism (aka Jews For Jesus) suggested earlier in this thread. I don't know what they believe about EOL issues, but no Jewish demonination (Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, Reconstructionist) recognizes Jews for Jesus as a religiously Jewish organization. The general consensus among Jews is that Messianic Judaism attempts to convert born Jews to what is essentially Christianity, by telling them that Jesus is the fulfillment of their Jewish faith. Here is more about Messianic Judaism. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messianic_Judaism

    According to the Central Conference of American Rabbis (Reform):
    "For us in the Jewish community, anyone who claims that Jesus is their savior is no longer a Jew and is an apostate. Through that belief she has placed herself outside the Jewish community. Whether she cares to define herself as a Christian or as a 'fulfilled Jew,' 'Messianic Jew,' or any other designation is irrelevant; to us, she is clearly a Christian."
    markkuss, pedicurn, GrnTea, and 4 others like this.
  2. 0
    Quote from miss jamie
    Along this line, you might also consider emailing rabbis from different denominations on this topic.

    However I will caution you about "Messianic" Judaism (aka Jews For Jesus) suggested earlier in this thread. I don't know what they believe about EOL issues, but no Jewish demonination (Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, Reconstructionist) recognizes Jews for Jesus as a religiously Jewish organization. The general consensus among Jews is that Messianic Judaism attempts to convert born Jews to what is essentially Christianity, by telling them that Jesus is the fulfillment of their Jewish faith. Here is more about Messianic Judaism. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Messianic_Judaism

    According to the Central Conference of American Rabbis (Reform):
    "For us in the Jewish community, anyone who claims that Jesus is their savior is no longer a Jew and is an apostate. Through that belief she has placed herself outside the Jewish community. Whether she cares to define herself as a Christian or as a 'fulfilled Jew,' 'Messianic Jew,' or any other designation is irrelevant; to us, she is clearly a Christian."
    This. Thanks for pointing this out.
  3. 7
    1. OP was not making a judgment, he/she was making an observation from experience.

    2. As a previous poster noted, there always has to be some highly offended individuals in every discussion.

    3. OP this is the time to do some research into EOL issues with different cultures to foster a deeper understanding of the variations.
    markkuss, GrnTea, talaxandra, and 4 others like this.
  4. 6
    With regard to the women taking care of men comment, it actually is an Orthodox practice. As a (reform) Jew, I know that women can't touch men during "that time" and after until they have taken a ritual bath. Since it would be impossible, and offensive, to ask the nurse if she is "clean" they would just prefer to avoid it. Like all things that are prohibited, these requirements are usually waived if it is medically necessary. For instance, you aren't supposed to drive or engage in commerce on the Sabbath, but if it's a medical emergency it is considered acceptable.

    Also, Girlygirl, I'm not offended by your question. I think it is good to be inquisitive. What bothers me is when people make generalizations and spread them on because they didn't seek answers.
  5. 0
    Quote from mama_d
    Pretty much the only consistent thing I've seen in years of bedside care that relates to religion is that Jehovah's Witness pts don't get bllod products. And all our nuns and priests have DNR/medical management (the equivalent of no heroic measures), and ALWAYS have their directives/POA papers on hand. We've got several sisterhoods who place their members in the ALF and SNF on our campus, so we get a lot of nuns.

    I don't think there's anything wrong with the question you raised, BTW. Don't we take classes in school that are geared specifically towards what certain religious or ethnic groups "generally" do?
    My school didn't go in depth with eah religion, just the basics. Surprisingly I've had a number of Jehovah witness patients who has accepted blood, but many wanted it done in private and without their family knowing so.
  6. 0
    Quote from Horseshoe
    I have never come across this before, and we have a very large Jewish community in my city. Is this an Orthodox preference or no? I've only been a nurse for 15 years, but I've never heard of this being the case.
    We get a lot of Hasidic Jewish pts.
  7. 2
    I have seen patients from all forms of formal and informal religions. The end of life issues are more personal based than religion, race, nationality or sex. Some people just can't or won't let there loved one's go.....
    leslie :-D and Hospice Nurse LPN like this.


Top