Disaster/Pandemic preparedness - page 5

I was looking the the other Disaster/Pandemic thread that Florida1 started. She mentioned that after the hurricanes, that they had problems getting basic supplies and food stores were often closed... Read More

  1. by   indigo girl
    Non Pharmaceutical Interventions (NPI), what you could be doing to
    prepare now:

    http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2007/03/npi-101.html


    Quote from afludiary.blogspot.com/2007/03/npi-101.
    Given the scarcity of antivirals, and the nearly non-existence of a vaccine, the primary protection most of us will have during a pandemic will be NPI's, or Non Pharmaceutical Interventions.

    All of us would, of course, prefer a shot that would protect us, or a pill that would cure us, but neither are going to be available in any quantity during the first 6 to 12 months of a pandemic.
  2. by   sanctuary
    I'm having a hard time getting anybody to listen. My own place of employment has no clue. no prep, nuttin'.
  3. by   indigo girl
    Well, so you know now how it is going to be. Better to know now rather than after the first cases hit North America.

    You are prepared, but your workplace is not.

    If pandemic occurs, they will be opening special facilities just for pandemic cases, most likely in auditoriums and large spaces. These places will be providing PPE. Your help will be solicited.
  4. by   indigo girl
    Canada, pandemic planning:
    http://www.ccohs.ca/pandemic/
  5. by   indigo girl
  6. by   sanctuary
    Quote from indigo girl

    If we can't learn from the Canuks, maybe we can listen to the Limeys. Another thought provoking link. Thanks.
  7. by   indigo girl
    Idaho Homeland Security Advice:http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2007/0...cials-get.html

    Quote from http://www.idahostatesman.com/102/story/78804.html
    Working parents: Imagine the logistics of childcare if schools closed for weeks on end.

    Everyone else: Imagine the long-distance truck haulers that daily replenish food supplies...making only sporadic deliveries.

    "Nobody is immune from this. Even if you don't get the virus, you will be impacted," Darcus Allen with Central District Health Department said.

    If a flu pandemic strikes, Idaho health officials want everyone to consider these very possible scenarios.
  8. by   indigo girl
    Community Engagement: Leadership Tool for Catastophic Health Events:
    http://www.upmc-biosecurity.org/webs...ll_report.html
    Lengthy but well worth reading or you could just skim through it and focus on the panflu sections.
    (hat tip fluwiki)
  9. by   indigo girl
    PPE's and HCWs, an essay from Avian Flu Diary on protecting ourselves.
    How well is your facility going to protect you? The time to consider this is
    sooner rather than later. May I suggest that you buy your own now while they
    are still readily available? Use them at home or at work, your choice.

    http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2007/04/ppe-and-hcw.html
    Last edit by indigo girl on Apr 10, '07
  10. by   indigo girl
    National Governor's Association Launces Pandemic Outbreak Workshop:
    (hat tip PFIF/pixie)
    http://www.govtech.net/news/story.print.php?id=104870

    Quote from http://www.govtech.net/news/story.print.php?id=104870
    A pandemic will affect virtually all sectors of society, mandating that officials not only contain the outbreak itself, but also ensure the availability of essential services. HHS estimates even a moderately severe pandemic could cause more than 200,000 deaths in the U.S., with nearly 130,000 Americans requiring intensive medical care and 65,000 needing mechanical ventilators. Worker absenteeism could affect operation of power plants and water treatment, law enforcement and medical facilities. Reductions in delivery services could cause food shortages and schools could close, increasing the numbers of absent workers as parents stay home to care for their children.
    Last edit by indigo girl on Apr 24, '07
  11. by   indigo girl
    A simple Red Cross video about preparing for pandemic. It recommends storing 2 weeks worth of food and supplies. The Red Cross has prepared itself based on the 1918 Spanish flu scenario of waves of infection lasting 12 weeks, and occurring as 2 to 3 waves in a year.

    Do what you can. Start with 2 weeks worth of supplies.

    http://a1881.g.akamai.net/7/1881/266...PF_Video1.html

    (hat tip fluwiki)
    Last edit by indigo girl on Apr 11, '07
  12. by   indigo girl
    Pennsylvania school districts are preparing for the possibility of pandemic
    influenza:

    http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07102/777097-56.stm

    Quote from http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/07102/777097-56.stm
    The action plan is part of a statewide call for schools to work with their communities and create an effective response in the event of a flu crisis, namely avian flu.

    Ms. Yeloushan is trying to cover all bases of preparedness, from delegating tasks within the staff to contacting grief counselors who would help the students cope in the event of a crisis. She even wrote a sample letter to be sent out to the parents of 950 students so she would have them "all in line and ready to go," she said.

    "Students aren't just going to get sick, it's going to be everybody," she said.

    Schools would play a key role in flu pandemic response, because the buildings might be used by the state to house patients and as sites to administer mass medication if hospitals were full.

    School buildings also would provide a large space if the state called for a quarantine to prevent avian flu from spreading. Even school buses might be used in the event of emergency.

    Tom Mangan, Emergency Preparedness and Response manager for Allegheny County, urges schools to take an "all hazards approach" when designing their preparedness plan, so it can be used if other types of crises hit.

    "Everything is within the realm of possibility," he said, alluding to natural disasters, terrorist attacks, bomb threats and other situations that would disrupt the school community. "You have to think about everything and anything that could happen."

    If a pandemic occurred, symptoms might be seen in children sooner than adults; another reason to implement a plan for school districts, Mr. Mangan said.

    So far, the avian flu, called H5N1, is in phase three on a World Health Organization scale of six. That means there is no or very limited human to human transmission. So far, the only human cases have been reported in Asia and Africa.

    But health officials warn that the virus could spread to the United States. They also warn that if the virus mutated by mixing with a common, or garden variety, flu, the resulting new virus could be transferred by human to human contact. This would elevate the flu pandemic stage above phase three and call for emergency response.

    "When and if this hits, we'll have plans in place for what we do," he said. "These kinds of things -- you don't like to talk about them, but you have to be aware of them," Mr. Foster said.
    Amen.
  13. by   indigo girl
    Some thinking about protective masks and why PSAs downplay the need
    for them. I do think that it boils down to the fact that there are not
    enough available. Of course, they can not say that.

    http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2007/0...asked-man.html

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