characteristic c-diff odor?? - page 5

by CraftyLPN

108,521 Views | 59 Comments

HI.. GOT a question........ I have ben researching c-diff the last couple days..to broaden my learning on it..... But I have also heard that when a pt. has c-diff there is a characteristic smell to the BM.... WHAt's it... Read More


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    How reliable are the stool test? I mean, I asked a Gastroenterologist, who answered (as he passed by me) that you have to run three stool samples to find it and two will be negative and one positive so how can we be sure enough of a negative result to send the patient home when a missed diagnosis could lead to life threatening complications? Is there a better and more reliable test than running stool samples?
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    I can usually tell when I walk onto a unit if there is a pt there who has C-Diff. First day on the job, walked onto the unit, turned to the nurse & asked.. WHo has C-Diff?? She said no one, I said no, someone does & proceeded to walk down the hall sniffing at each room, I did find the room, a look at the stool and a sample sent out confirmed it. Nurses were all amazed, I was wondering how they could have missed it! I've actually caught it at the very early stages. Guess I'm one of those sensitive types.
    leslie :-D likes this.
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    This thread "stinks!"

    heheheh
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    Quote from raggyann
    How reliable are the stool test? I mean, I asked a Gastroenterologist, who answered (as he passed by me) that you have to run three stool samples to find it and two will be negative and one positive so how can we be sure enough of a negative result to send the patient home when a missed diagnosis could lead to life threatening complications? Is there a better and more reliable test than running stool samples?
    C-diff has to be collected right away and not mixed in with urine for better results...
    It needs to be "hot off the press!"
    Room temperature makes the toxin break down and can render a negative test result, thus collecting the sample 3 times...

    I think the nose is the most reliable way to detect c-diff (this thread is giving me PTSD- hahah)
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    That's great gentlegiver, forgive me but I had to LMBO as the involuntary image of someone sniffing from door to door invaded my minds eye Hot off the press rkitty198?The thought of a warm aromatic container while i desperately fumble for a lid! Ha ha!But seriously, i wish there was a better way because until i get that golden aromatic imprint on my brain i am doomed to be the curious sniffer!
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    The stool test used for C. Diff in many labs (including hospital labs) is so unreliable, had so many false negatives that it is absurd. There is a PCR assay that is 95 to 98% accurate and is fast (20 minutes to run), yet many labs don't offer this assay which is horrible. Start asking your labs and hospitals about this and demanding the PCR assay tests for C. Diff.
    Johns Hopkins has completely stopped using the EIA test that many hospital labs use (and that have an extremely high number of false negatives.) It's a horrible test. When the PCR assay is available, it should be used. How is it ethical to NOT use it?
    Also, in all Scandinavian countries, after ONE recurrence of C. Diff, it is STANDARD practice for patients to be given a fecal infusion, which is easy, inexpensive and highly curative. They aren't having the C. Diff problems in our hospitals that we are. Wonder why? Can we move into the 21st century?
    raggyann likes this.
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    Thank you SO much SL233! That was so extremely helpful! You are such an asset to the medical community, if only there were more like you! EXCELLENT!
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    Quote from P_RN
    I can't smell anymore, but it used to be like a stable or barn-like "fragrance."
    Coming from farmland and having small barn animals, I have to say I love the smell of barns, horses and cows. No way does my barn smell like C diff. If it did, I would have to torch it.
    Egriff likes this.
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    If the odor is that bad (it is)---it is the least of the problems with C. Diff for professionals. And for patients.
    Seriously, why don't we have the ACCURATE PCR Assay test for C. Diff in every lab? Certainly it should be in every major medical center---but it's not! Truly, it is not. How absurd! It puts healthcare workers at risk themselves, much less the patients, and simply makes our healthcare costs higher (when they need not be.)

    I shake my head when I read about the "ick" factor to "fecal infusions"---then I read a post like this (which has its truths, for sure) but if the ODOR alone is that bad, how bad can ODORLESS fecal infusions with high curative rates be? What in the world is so "icky" about them? I really don't get it.

    And what kills those stubborn C. Diff spores, ready for the next sick patient? Clorox. Plain and simple Clorox. Proper cleaning. Proper handwashing. Use of probiotics (know which ones crowd out C. Diff the most). I am very serious about the growing virulence of this bacteria, as it mutates in the face of Vanco, Flagyl, and Xifaxan. Patients in this country should not have to undergo surgery to have parts of their colon removed because of C. Diff infections.

    Patients in this country should not have to develop sepsis because this country and its hospitals have a phobic "ick" factor re: fecal infusions/transplants or because proper testing is unavailable. Again, check out the routine procedure to handle this situation in all Scandinavian countries. Their nurses and other health care professionals don't have to deal so much with the horrible odor of C. Diff, and their patients don't have to live with the horror of having C. Diff recurrences, sometimes moving into CDAD.

    Nurses have more power than they realize, or maybe they realize it, but don't use it. Demand PCR assays for C. Diff that are reliable tests (quicker treatment, less odor, less pain for patients, less dehydration, less sepsis, fewer virulent outbreaks like the 2004 one in Quebec.) Demand fecal infusions. Not MORE antibiotics ONLY--for I obviously realize the importance of antibiotics (but they will only lead to more virulent strains of C. Diff) and more odor for every nurse who deals with these sick patients. As mentioned above, in Scandinavian countries, first C. Diff illness is treated with vanco or flagyl. If another episode of C. Diff occurs, STANDARD procedure with fabulous success: fecal infusions.
    Last edit by SL233 on May 27, '11 : Reason: Correct issue surrounding antibiotic use
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    TOTAL AGREEMENT SL233!!
    So glad your here! Please keep in mind ladies and gents if your child is in the hospital with C Diff, this is the response, this is the kind of nurse you are going to want in the room caring for your child. Not the nurse who hides behind a wall laughing with her/his co workers at the horrible smell in room 103. This is the best of the best. I sure hope if it happens to me or my child I will be lucky enough to get a nurse like SL233.


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