Career switch - from 6 figure salary - page 5

Just wanted to share my situation for those of you who are thinking of changing careers -- you are not alone! I currently work in the IT field and make 108k a year (in NJ). I have a 5 month old... Read More

  1. by   ProfRN4
    Quote from Hopegirl
    So a new grad can work per diem? I think this would be ideal for me once I graduate...

    TIA-J
    Not very likely, as most people want per-diems to have experience. You will not get the orientation you deserve. Best advice is to start something full time and switch to per-diem (at that job) after a year or so, that way you will have gotten your experience. It's even hard to get part-time as a new grad, b/c they feel you need to work FT to get the hang of it.
  2. by   rn500
    If you have to work full time, which I do, I feel that nursing has provided me with more flexibility than many other professions would. I have worked 12hr night shifts for many years. Yes, the every other weekend thing sucks, As does the holiday thing. And yes there have been some nights when I absolutely could not make a switch and have had to miss my kids evening school things.

    BUT -

    I am there during the day if my kids get sick (which was often).

    Everywhere I have worked, the holiday schedule always was such that you either had the day or the eve off, usually switching every other year. When my kids were small I could often find someone who wanted to work my Christmas if I worked their New Years. If I work Christmas Eve, we open presents when I get home, I have a nap, then we still do the Christmas dinner/family thing. If I work Christmas Day (meaning I go in at 7pm on Christmas day), then I have had the whole day to spend with my family. My kids and hubby have never known anything else with me, and they are fine with it.

    I usually work no more than 2 nights in a row so that things don't get too out of hand around the house before I am available again. But if I chose to, I could work my 3 all in a row and have a stretch off, or work one day at a time.

    By clustering your shifts the right way, you can have a week off and not use any vacation time.

    I don't have to try to cram in everything I need to do on Saturday and Sunday, when what I really want to do is have time with my family.

    During the week, when the kids are in school, I HAVE TIME ALL TO MYSELF!! (very big plus in my book!)

    There are alot of minuses too, but aren't there in most jobs? You just have to weigh the good and the bad.

    Good luck
  3. by   Gldngrl
    Quote from lizz
    This number is quoted out out context so often, it needs to be put into some perspective.

    That number comes from a U.S. Health Department report, which also said that 70 percent of those people are over 50, and they don't know much about them. Meaning, we don't know how many retirements are in there, how many are deceased, etc.

    If the government doesn't know, you don't either. We don't know how many nurses are choosing not to work in the profession.

    I can certainly surmise that while there are those who are retired, or are ill, disabled, there are certainly a great number out that are not working in nursing and are working in a closely related profession, or have chosen another. I know from personal experience numbers of nurses leaving to go back to graduate school to enter a different profession, returning to a former profession, or are simply leaving, period. There are nurses that enjoy their careers and the benefits outweigh the negatives, but there are others who disagree. Each profession has its share of benefits and risks, but in any case, both should be disclosed realistically to those entering a given profession so that they can make informed decisions.
  4. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Gldngrl
    I can certainly surmise that while there are those who are retired, or are ill, disabled, there are certainly a great number out that are not working in nursing and are working in a closely related profession, or have chosen another. I know from personal experience numbers of nurses leaving to go back to graduate school to enter a different profession, returning to a former profession, or are simply leaving, period. There are nurses that enjoy their careers and the benefits outweigh the negatives, but there are others who disagree. Each profession has its share of benefits and risks, but in any case, both should be disclosed realistically to those entering a given profession so that they can make informed decisions.
    I agree. And it's certainly possible that a good number of nurses have left the profession due to bad working conditions. It's just that people tend to overlook the fact that the RN workforce is also aging, and that too might have something to do with the shortage and those numbers.

    The average age of nurses is now 46, whereas, 20 years ago it was 25. Therefore, it's not surprizing that the same survey which found 500,000 non-working licensed nurses, also said the number of retired nurses jumped from a relatively stable 25,000, to 175,000. Another half million nurses are expected to retire in the next 20 years because of advanced age. Certainly this has something to do with the shortage as well, not just poor working conditions.

    :spin:
    Last edit by Sheri257 on May 29, '04
  5. by   tj796
    I don't know if I'll help but I'll try. It is soooo super hard making a decision to do something for the rest of your life - and maybe you shouldn't put that pressure on yourself. Is it children you want to teach, or adults? Would being a nursing instructor be an option for you?



    Quote from futurenurse01
    some please help!I have been reading all the posted comments on the site in regards to the career switch. I am a full time student who is aspiring to become a nurse but I also have a love for teaching. my heart and mind are both torturing me causing me great confusion in making my career decisions. I'm posting this because I don't know any nurses who can give any real advice on the nursing perfession. The people I do know in the medical field are CNA's who think I should become a nurse because the salary is good. I really don't know what to do and I'm just looking for someone to place a little light on the real situation of being a nurse, I would like to know the good, the bad, and indifferent.

    Thank you in advance to all that reply.
  6. by   tj796
    I too am changing careers for nursing and I can't wait to finish! ALL jobs on the planet have negatives - there is no perfect job and it is wrong to think that any job ever will be.

    Quote from ClimbingNurse
    A lot of the above posts made me fuming mad! Melly, a lot of these people are angry at life, not nursing. :angryfire

    The most laughable comment has to be about nursing not having any job security because we are usually employed "at will" meaning we can be fired any time. Newsflash: 99% of the people in this country are employed "at will." You clearly have no idea what it means to have no job security.

    I used to work in IT. To give you an idea, imagine that you've just spent 20 years becoming a kickbutt ER nurse. And then imagine that all the hospitals on the planet just stopped doing emergency medicine. That's what IT is like. (Just substitute ERP Software for ED Nursing.) In nursing, even if your ER closes, you can always go across town and get a new job.

    When was the last time someone posted on this board about not being able to find a job?

    Oh, and the people who complain about not having enough flexibility. Hello?! Do you know what it's like to work 6 12's? With no overtime compensation? For weeks on end? That's what many of my IT jobs were like.

    And then of course people complain about the money. Well, a lot of them are probably not willing to work OT. What do you expect for 36 hours a week? No one is going to pay you 6 figures working 3 days a week with a bachelor's or less. No one.

    People have these fantasies in their heads about what a working day is like for people with "normal" jobs. They have this infuriating notion that there are people out there who put in 40-hour work weeks in stressfree jobs and pull down 6 figure salaries. And even better, they think these people can take time off anytime they desire. And the best part: They think they have job security.

    And a final piece of advice: Don't take advice from anyone over the internet.
  7. by   sloydrn
    Bravo for having the courage to make a difficult change! I'm a mother of 2 daughters who both graduated high school last week. When they were young (both in diapers) I gave up my FT Head nurse job which I loved, to work part time evenings as a supervisor and concurrently attend graduate school. My husband and I both made monetary and time sacrifices so my children were only at day care 3xw. ONe of us was always with them otherwise. It was VERY difficult, but looking back, I can tell you for sure...what my children remember is the TIME I spent with them, not how much MONEY I spent ON them! For me it was the right choice and I'm not saying it would have been the right choice for everyone, but you can never get those precious days back when your children are young, and that time really shapes their future. You might check out nursing scholarships too. The Govt has MANY scholarships that are just sitting there for nurses that noone takes. Some institutions also will pay your nursing school tuition if you agree to work for them for a period of time (like 2 years) after graduation. I know Baylor in Texas has an offer such as this. I would recommend looking into that. Start with a GOOGLE search and go from there. Who knows, maybe you can combine your nursing skills with the IT field one day and have the best of both! If it feels right to you, go for it! Best of Luck! Nursing is not an easy profession, but it can be rewarding and flexible for sure.
    Quote from melly06
    Just wanted to share my situation for those of you who are thinking of changing careers -- you are not alone!

    I currently work in the IT field and make 108k a year (in NJ). I have a 5 month old baby girl, who I only see for 1.5-2 hrs at night during the week, then on Sat and Sunday. That just isn't enough for me. I have decided to switch careers and become a nurse. I am going back to school in Fall. It should take me 2 1/2 years. If all goes according to plan I will take the boards Dec '06.

    I have been mulling over being a nurse for some time. The IT job just doesn't satisfy me. Though the $$ is great, I feel that if I have to be away from my daughter I should be doing something more rewarding and fulfilling. I must admit, the flexible hours are a huge draw as well. As a nurse I would work 2-3 nights a week, and be able to spend my days with my daughter -- no daycare necessary! Plus, NJ has lots of opportunities for nurses.

    I would like another child, but want to make sure I am at least done with my final class before giving birth. They would end up 3 yrs apart, but I don't want to risk not being able to finish school - especially with the investment we will be making (savings runs out after a year - so we are in for loans and any part time work I can get at night to try to make up some of the difference).

    We have a lot to work out, but I am taking it one semester at a time. I think going back to school to be a nurse takes 100% committment - but the good news is at least in the beginning I'll see more of my daughter going to school (taking Chem and Bio first semester) than I do right now working fulltime and commuting 1.5 hours each way!.

    Anyone who is in the same boat and would like support or has any questions, feel free to contact me!

    Melly06
  8. by   lady_jezebel
    You may be romanticizing nursing. It's very difficult work -- physically exhausting & thankless most of the time. You should think VERY deeply about your decision before leaving IT. Try shadowing a nurse for a while.

    Why not try to create an IT job at home somehow? I know there are companies that are into the telecommuting thing. THAT would be ideal!
  9. by   marys
    Hi Melly06;

    My name is Mary Sheldon. I know exactly how you feel!! I was laid off from a very high paying job as a PM in IT in Oct 2002. The IT market has been flooded for awhile. After 3 mths of looking to no avail, I decided to go back to school in Nursing - something that I had wanted to do since I was 16. But I was a single mom raising 3 kids at the time and IT paid much better...

    I have just completed my first semester of Nursing school. I absolutely LOVE IT.

    It does take some getting used to being a student again - with little income. But as I was once told by a very dear friend.. - This too will Pass. I think that your background in IT will help you tremendously! I am seeing that there is becoming a big demand for the field of 'Nursing Infromatics'.

    The nursing shortage is not going to end anytime soon. Advantages are that they are paying top dollar for nurses, you can almost name your price. Also, there is more opportunity to work anywhere that you want. You are not limited to hospitals anymore..

    Even though it is hard, I know that for me, it has been the right decision. I hope that helps..

    mar
    Quote from melly06
    Just wanted to share my situation for those of you who are thinking of changing careers -- you are not alone!

    I currently work in the IT field and make 108k a year (in NJ). I have a 5 month old baby girl, who I only see for 1.5-2 hrs at night during the week, then on Sat and Sunday. That just isn't enough for me. I have decided to switch careers and become a nurse. I am going back to school in Fall. It should take me 2 1/2 years. If all goes according to plan I will take the boards Dec '06.

    I have been mulling over being a nurse for some time. The IT job just doesn't satisfy me. Though the $$ is great, I feel that if I have to be away from my daughter I should be doing something more rewarding and fulfilling. I must admit, the flexible hours are a huge draw as well. As a nurse I would work 2-3 nights a week, and be able to spend my days with my daughter -- no daycare necessary! Plus, NJ has lots of opportunities for nurses.

    I would like another child, but want to make sure I am at least done with my final class before giving birth. They would end up 3 yrs apart, but I don't want to risk not being able to finish school - especially with the investment we will be making (savings runs out after a year - so we are in for loans and any part time work I can get at night to try to make up some of the difference).

    We have a lot to work out, but I am taking it one semester at a time. I think going back to school to be a nurse takes 100% committment - but the good news is at least in the beginning I'll see more of my daughter going to school (taking Chem and Bio first semester) than I do right now working fulltime and commuting 1.5 hours each way!.

    Anyone who is in the same boat and would like support or has any questions, feel free to contact me!

    Melly06
  10. by   kathy_79
    go for it. you see how rewarding is time which you will give to your baby later. i have 18 months , i am nursing student and i wait to finish school to start work and have another one because of flexibilities the job carries on. i can work 3-4 days or nights and give rest of time to my family, it is just great. do not terrify, you will do fine at school. it is hard with baby, but think how many other women do this and if they can you can too.

    good luck, kathy
  11. by   Sheri257
    Quote from lady_jezebel
    You may be romanticizing nursing. It's very difficult work -- physically exhausting & thankless most of the time. You should think VERY deeply about your decision before leaving IT. Try shadowing a nurse for a while.

    Why not try to create an IT job at home somehow? I know there are companies that are into the telecommuting thing. THAT would be ideal!
    You are definitely romanticizing IT. :chuckle

    IT jobs are being exported overseas in droves. This has been widely reported in the news. There are no IT jobs in America (or, if there are some jobs, it's very few and decreasing by the day.)

    But hey, maybe they can move to India or China, and work for less than $10 an hour, if they can get that much.

    I love it when nurses tell IT people to remain in the field, when there is no IT to speak of ...

    We all know that nursing is a tough, demanding and thankless job.

    But life is much tougher when you have NO job.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jun 3, '04
  12. by   realmean1
    Just have to post on this thread :chuckle I personally think work of any type suxxes. Am an RN supervisor, have worked in just about every part of a hospital there is. Been a hopital corpsman, a CNA, LPN etc. Have worked every type of frigging shift there is to work. My personal record is 1 and 1/2 mos of 7p-7a straight, NO time off. Yep, that was fun. Anyhow, take a good hard look at nursing. It is pretty good, pays the bills. But, if you get sick easily, can't stand the sight of a pt throwing up, usually all over you, someone bleeding out, constant diarrhea, etc etc. Then, you may want to try something else. Usually, the problems you will encounter is not the pts, but, the staff. We are our own worse enemies. Getting fired as an "at will" employee is not an everyday thing. Getting really p.o.ed and quitting is another. Nsg. jobs are easy to come by, but, you want to avoid job hopping every 3-4 months unless you are per deim. People will talk about ya. And yes, I have done lots of other things besides nursing. Good luck inwhatever you decide.
    Last edit by realmean1 on Jun 3, '04 : Reason: error on page
  13. by   angel337
    Quote from lizz
    You are definitely romanticizing IT. :chuckle

    IT jobs are being exported overseas in droves. This has been widely reported in the news. There are no IT jobs in America (or, if there are some jobs, it's very few and decreasing by the day.)

    But hey, maybe they can move to India or China, and work for less than $10 an hour, if they can get that much.

    I love it when nurses tell IT people to remain in the field, when there is no IT to speak of ...

    We all know that nursing is a tough, demanding and thankless job.

    But life is much tougher when you have NO job.

    well said. from an administrative/management point of view, nursing can be thankless. but i don't feel that way because everyday i go to work i can't count the many patients that say "thank you so much nurse, i appreciate it". hearing patients say that definitely makes nursing worthwhile in my opinion. and yes, life is 100x's harder with no job at all.

close