A nurse's week story - page 2

first off happy nurse's week everyone. i was all excited about it being nurse's week and i thought all these great things would happen: getting a yummy cake actually having staff just... Read More

  1. by   James Huffman
    Quote from eltrip

    I do get what you're saying, though, Mr. Huffman. Could part of the issue be that other professions usually have other perquisites that are provided to the employees...bonuses, even? Pink-collar fields usually deal with the young and the sick. These two segments of our population are sadly, not valued by our society. While those who are in these fields are often very dedicated, they are frequently not regarded as essential either by our society or their employees. These recognition weeks are nothing more than a bone being thrown to those in these fields (it's Teacher's Week, too) in place of actual respect and pay.
    Lots of people work with the young and the sick. Such as pediatric surgeons, attorneys doing malpractice stuff, etc.

    I think the bigger issue is why nurses don't like to talk about money. And if someone is shy about talking about money, they are sure to lose out in a negotiation involving pay.

    There was a long discussion here a while back. The OP asked nurses if they would work for $11 an hour. The discussion was almost painful to watch. My thought whenever such nonsense comes up is, "What's the point of this?" Nobody here's doing this for charity, nor should we be. Trying to guess "what's the lowest I would work for" is ridiculous.

    I have a daughter in college, who's working as a babysitter this summer for $9 an hour. The house is nice, the children are pleasant, and there's not a lot of heavy lifting involved. And she could have made more than $9, if she had pressed the issue. But she's a college student, and it's not bad money for her. But, frankly, any professional in 2007 who talks about making $11 an hour kind of deserves whatever she gets.

    We're professionals. Professionals demand professional compensation for professional services. Whenever we settle for less than top pay, we're demeaning not only ourselves, but the whole field.
  2. by   TemperStripe
    Happy Nurses Week, everyone!

    To respond to the above postings, I don't think it has to do with nurses being afraid to talk about money. I think it has to do with women in general being afraid to talk about money, but it just so happens that we're a predominately female career path so I can see why it would be easy to make that generalization. Even the ladies I currently work with (not in healthcare) have expressed that the subject makes them uncomfortable.
  3. by   James Huffman
    Quote from line just line
    Happy Nurses Week, everyone!

    To respond to the above postings, I don't think it has to do with nurses being afraid to talk about money. I think it has to do with women in general being afraid to talk about money, but it just so happens that we're a predominately female career path so I can see why it would be easy to make that generalization. Even the ladies I currently work with (not in healthcare) have expressed that the subject makes them uncomfortable.
    One side of me agrees with you. But I think it's more complex than that.

    I'm not sure it's that difficult for women to talk about money. (Most of the participants in the thread I mentioned were women). And they were talking away about money. Whining, perhaps. Maybe speaking dysfunctionally. But definitely talking about money.

    What does seem difficult for some women nurses is an assertive discussion about money, especially when it's about themselves. Saying -- for example -- "No, I can't work for that amount. What's the highest you can go with salary in this position?" Or: "I charge $__ per case. So my fee for that job would be $__."

    What's underlying this? I won't presume to analyze, but suspect that beneath it all is a suspicion among some nurses that their work is really not worth very much. I also suspect that related to this is the incessant whining among nurses that "no one respects us." The bigger problem is probably that, deep down, many nurses don't respect themselves or the work they or their colleagues do, and so they project a disrespect onto others. Doctors are a perfect example. Almost every doctor I've ever known deeply respected their nurse colleagues, and appreciate our work in the healthcare industry. But I'm always hearing nurses saying that docs don't respect them. Is that because if we don't respect ourselves, we just don't hear genuine words of praise, respect, and collegiality?
  4. by   TemperStripe
    Quote from James Huffman
    What does seem difficult for some women nurses is an assertive discussion about money, especially when it's about themselves. Saying -- for example -- "No, I can't work for that amount. What's the highest you can go with salary in this position?" Or: "I charge $__ per case. So my fee for that job would be $__."
    Absolutely, and well said. My post was definitely not specific enough. This is totally the issue.
  5. by   muffie
    whatsoever would i have to complain about ????

    i got a FREE CUP OF COFFEE from my employer this week

    after 20 years of full time work

    and a free pen from the union

    i can barely keep quiet the joy within me
  6. by   Cattitude
    Quote from James Huffman
    One side of me agrees with you. But I think it's more complex than that.

    I'm not sure it's that difficult for women to talk about money. (Most of the participants in the thread I mentioned were women). And they were talking away about money. Whining, perhaps. Maybe speaking dysfunctionally. But definitely talking about money.

    What does seem difficult for some women nurses is an assertive discussion about money, especially when it's about themselves. Saying -- for example -- "No, I can't work for that amount. What's the highest you can go with salary in this position?" Or: "I charge $__ per case. So my fee for that job would be $__."

    What's underlying this? I won't presume to analyze, but suspect that beneath it all is a suspicion among some nurses that their work is really not worth very much. I also suspect that related to this is the incessant whining among nurses that "no one respects us." The bigger problem is probably that, deep down, many nurses don't respect themselves or the work they or their colleagues do, and so they project a disrespect onto others. Doctors are a perfect example. Almost every doctor I've ever known deeply respected their nurse colleagues, and appreciate our work in the healthcare industry. But I'm always hearing nurses saying that docs don't respect them. Is that because if we don't respect ourselves, we just don't hear genuine words of praise, respect, and collegiality?
    I agree with just about everything Mr.H. I happen to be an assertive woman who has no problem asking for what I want. But I think I'm in a minority and too few female nurses such as myself.

    I remember working at my previous hospital when our contract was up. Our union was negotiating for better wages and Admin. didn't want to give in. So the Union wanted the RN's to do a protest in front of the hospital. You know how many showed up? About 20. Out of approx. 1,500! It was pathetic and the reason we kept getting a paltry 3% raise. So I feel that you're right, who respects that if the nurses didn't even respect themselves enough to show up?

    I'm sure that some may take offense to your words but I understand them. Too many want to stick their heads in the sand and pretend that the problem is not them. It is all of us. I have said it before, we have so much potential power that it is amazing. If nurses were truly cohesive in this country, there would be nothing we couldn't get.

    We could have the pay, the best benefits, everything we wanted. We have the capability right there within our grasp. I believe that one day it will happen.

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