Pensacola nursing schools good? - page 2

Hello-- I'm looking for information on the quality of schools in Pensacola for nursing like the nursing program at Pensacola Junior College and University of West Florida... Can anybody help? :D... Read More

  1. by   wsp4905
    Quote from Jacs7284
    pjc is a horrible school for RN. believe what you hear, things are pretty bad there...you will teach yourself. graduation rate is really low compared to the amount of students who start.
    This is all I hear, as a LPN student at PJC, several students in our class are from the RN program. They all said the instructors don't want to teach, you are completely on your own. You are lucky if they do a test review & if they do they don't give you the rationales for the right answers.
    However, our LPN program is pretty good. The instructors DO teach, we have two days of class & two days of clinicals. More hands on. The instructors are fair, however they expect you to do your work & they firmly implement the attendance policy. (which they should). Several ppl have gone bye-bye do to missing too many days.
    Lots of ppl, take the LPN course to bridge to RN, because there is little to no wait. (Myself included)
  2. by   sleepdeprivedmomma
    As a student about to graduate from PJC's ADN program, let me clarify a few things. Currently, PJC is NLN accredited. They received this accreditation just before I began the program Spring 2009. If you expect to LOVE each and every instructor, you should consider a different profession. No one student is going to absolutely adore every single instructor every single semester. Is it tough? Um . . . yeah. You're learning how to care for people using medications, equipment, and instruments that, if used improperly, could injure or kill a person. It should be tough. Is it fair? I'd say 98% of the time, it is absolutely fair. The other 2% can really suck at times, but there isn't an employer out there that's gonna even give you those percentages. Instructors don't give reviews BEFORE tests because they expect you to have been studying every day and asking those questions as you go. They ALWAYS do a test review (the exception being finals) after a test and they always offer rationales (Maybe ONCE since I've started has there been an exception for a unit test). My best advice is realize the career choice you are about to make is one that involves a HIGH degree of personal responsibility. That should begin in the classroom. Though I understand many of the previous responses are from several years ago, I hope anyone reading this thread pays attention to that and can understand that the program is ever changing and evolving. Those changes seem to be geared toward making better RN's. I wish any who truly desire to pursue Nursing the best of luck and advise all to work hard, make POSITIVE friends, and don't give up.
  3. by   alayzia2003
    Has anyone been in the PJC career mobility program?
  4. by   BigERN
    Quote from sleepdeprivedmomma
    As a student about to graduate from PJC's ADN program, let me clarify a few things. Currently, PJC is NLN accredited. They received this accreditation just before I began the program Spring 2009. If you expect to LOVE each and every instructor, you should consider a different profession. No one student is going to absolutely adore every single instructor every single semester. Is it tough? Um . . . yeah. You're learning how to care for people using medications, equipment, and instruments that, if used improperly, could injure or kill a person. It should be tough. Is it fair? I'd say 98% of the time, it is absolutely fair. The other 2% can really suck at times, but there isn't an employer out there that's gonna even give you those percentages. Instructors don't give reviews BEFORE tests because they expect you to have been studying every day and asking those questions as you go. They ALWAYS do a test review (the exception being finals) after a test and they always offer rationales (Maybe ONCE since I've started has there been an exception for a unit test). My best advice is realize the career choice you are about to make is one that involves a HIGH degree of personal responsibility. That should begin in the classroom. Though I understand many of the previous responses are from several years ago, I hope anyone reading this thread pays attention to that and can understand that the program is ever changing and evolving. Those changes seem to be geared toward making better RN's. I wish any who truly desire to pursue Nursing the best of luck and advise all to work hard, make POSITIVE friends, and don't give up.


    As a graduate from PJC Nursing in 2009, I can agree with the above statement. PJC became accredited while I was there, which was a big step for the program. As far as instructors go, I find that I was fortunate enough to have developed relationships with several of the instructors and still use them as references. It is true that no matter where you are, you are not going to be 100% satisfied with every aspect of that particular program. If you are wanting to become an RN in two years, I think it is a fine school to attend, I am glad that I did. Unfortunately not everyone who enrolls and gets accepted into a nursing program does so for the love of nursing, but merely for the paycheck once the licensure is awarded. It is tough at times, and nursing school in general is extremely stressful, but if you are there for the right reasons, you will find a way to make it work, no matter where you decide to go.
  5. by   cnl1030
    My experience at PJC was pretty terrible... as far as some people saying "You get in what you put out." That infuriates me. I only had to be at school 3 days a week for classes and clinicals yet I went there 5 days. Almost all day on each. I read the book, went over powerpoints and notes, did the objectives, listened to recorded class lectures and had a study group. I did NOT get what I put out. I talked to my teacher 3 times about my low grades and all she could tell me was she doesn't know what she could do for me. If anyone challenged a question they didn't understand she would get angry with you. I did awesome in clinicals and lab. Never failed any practicums.. I just could not get the hang of the class tests. Nursing is all about critical thinking... yet they also say that as a nurse you can have a lot of your own opinions on how to do things. So pretty much all of the questions I missed were about "therapeutic answers" and what is the best response. It was rediculous. Apparently my opinion is just too different from the teachers that made these tests, and even though everyone else in my class could train their minds to think like theirs... I couldn't. I felt like the only time I learned was in clinicals with real experience. I passed the Hesi exam with no problem and PJC doesn't make up the questions. I was miserable at PJC the whole time and though many people succeeded and liked it, doesn't mean that those that didn't have a good experience didn't do their best. Anyway, the point is that PJC has bad reviews for a reason, and not because soo many people just didn't try to do well in the program. I have still NEVER heard a bad thing about Jefferson Davis, so that is where I am going to apply to now and go for my RN because I know that's what I want to do and I would be an awesome nurse. Oh and on the first day of orientation, they told us to look at the person to your left and that person will fail the program. That was their "inspirational speaking." I don't believe that trying to scare students away just to see who is strong enough to be a nurse is the right thing to do. Starting school was so emotionally overwhelming and you had so much new information to learn pretty much on your own, it was just too much and PJC did nothing to help. Some people just need a little more time to take everything in, I know I did.
  6. by   daves
    I'm finally going to put my two cents worth in Re PJC health programs. I am an ancient RN grad '86, after going through their Hospital Orderly, EMT, LPN, RN, and even got my Paramedic there.
    Nursing programs certainly don't have to be historically good - it all depends on the staff at the time you attend. So generally speaking, anywhere you go will end up being what you make of it.
    My girlfriend at the time, from Milton, actually went to Jeff Davis. She has done quite well. Now at that time you had to acquire a certain score to work outside of your original state of licensure. Some states were higher - some were lower. She is now in California.
    We have each done OK in all these many years. The point is to get through school - any school - and do the day to day learning that comes with work experience.
    Suerte.
  7. by   amystudent2012
    thank you sleepdeprivedmomma for your advice! this makes me feel better about going to pjc for my rn. it should be hard, like you said a nurse has a high degree of responsibility and i am glad that you posted this.

    thanks again!

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