Could really use some calming down right now - page 3

by proud nurse 4,818 Views | 28 Comments

New RN, just grad in May. Been in a long and grueling hospital orientation, working my butt off. Word is they're generally 10 weeks long, and I'm in my 9th week. I feel I'm ready to fly on my own. A few small mistakes, but... Read More


  1. 0
    I would not take it personally, but welcome any orientation i could get! Sounds like you are doing great!
  2. 1
    Grab the extra orientation time with both hands!
    RN1Each likes this.
  3. 0
    I have to agree with others - take the orientation if they will let you have it. If my boss had been willing to extend my orientation I would have been ecstatic. Well my current job is the exception but my old job I would have loved the extra time!

    I don't think it's a personal thing, don't read it as such. Is there a type of patient your unit carries frequently that you have not taken care of? Skills you have not had a lot of chances at but are 'common' (more than others) on this unit? Is there any education time you have but maybe aren't yet aware of? I know where I used to work, we were the med surg unit that would take trached patients. So we were really super at trach care where other patients popped more NGs and foleys in patients. We were also considered med surg / stepdown, so sometimes the acuity of our patients was through the freaking roof! Well, I worked on a neuro unit so our patients were high acuity even at the med surg level. And we were a monitored unit, with the most monitored beds in the hospital - we got a medley of patients off service.

    There's a ton to learn as a new grad. Don't take it personally. My other question - is it possible they want to give you a week or two on another shift than your primary incase they have to rotate you? There's lots of possible explanations. I was terrified to go off orientation.
  4. 0
    The worst case scenario is that they think you could benefit from more orientation, but you're getting no direct feedback on your weak areas. If this is the case, it is just plain silly that you haven't received any hint of where you may be a little behind. There is something you can and should do about that. You can simply request additional feedback. You can say you appreciate the positive feedback thus far, but you would like to know some areas for improvement and suggestions for how to go a/b it. I once had a supervisor who only gave me positive feedback 100% of the time. During my performance evaluation, I confronted the issue by saying that 1) There must be some areas for improvement & 2) I am open to hearing constructive criticism. Her response (paraphrased): "'MarieBailey', you are your own worst critic, and you have a lot of self awareness. Pointing out shortcomings your are already painfully aware of would not be productive." Maybe they see the critic in you?
  5. 0
    Be of good cheer~ All things are working together for you good! I honestly feel it was an honest mistake or they are just being kind to you. Kids are a tough population. You will do just fine. Take it in stride! I am a new NP. I make mistakes everyday, and I have promised not to kick myself for too long. Just to learn and move on. I have 4 preceptors. 2 like me and think I am great, the other 2 I can tell are not impressed. Regardless of what, I know that I will do a great job once i get on my own. I have no idea how long my orientation is and I am glad bc it would make me crazy if they extended it. So I know how you feel. But you will do just great~ I will keep you in my prayers. Keep your head up and knock um dead
  6. 0
    You were ME last November!

    I had my first job on a Tele unit at the Hospital; did an excellent job all around...was doing everything right and impressing my preceptor. I began to (incorrectly) link my level of competence with how long they were going to keep me on orientation. I was also on for 12 weeks, although I felt I could have done well with just 8.

    However, and PLEASE believe me here...NO ONE is judging your competence by how long (or short) you are on orientation. It's merely a point of pride to be able to say "yeah, I was only on for 8 weeks", but honestly, the other floor nurses might look a little more skeptically at someone who fought so hard to get off of orientation...perhaps thinking they only did it to stroke their own ego.

    In the long run, orientation is simply that...enjoy it IMMENSELY while you can. It has nothing to do with how well you perform your job.
  7. 1
    This is just so typical anymore. It sucks how they just won't implement objective systems with weekly evaluations. An orientee should NEVER go a week or two w/o objective evaluation and feedback. You should not have to guess where you are, and you should not be hit cold on the plan for you in the process.

    This kind of cr@p seriously annoys me.

    It's OK that you are getting more orientation time.

    What's wrong is that you have not been made aware of your progress in the most objective and constructive manner. This requires the use of objective metrics that are documented and reviewed consistently on at least a biweekly basis, and it includes you knowing what the plan for the next week or weeks is--specifically--in objective detail. Does your area employ a nurse educator?


    Sound prognostic indicators are desperately needed in nursing--especially for those on orientation/precepting.

    Huge pet peeve of mine.


    WEEKLY evals should mean specifics on goals and what the plan for you is within the next week! So regardless of whatever you were told in your weeklys, the process appears to leave a lot to be desired.

    Orienting people takes time and commitment. This is why I say preceptors should have some of their load cut--so they can focus fully on the preceptee.

    On top of that, objective, prognostic indicators are FAR better than subjective two-cents from preceptors. Limit the subjectivity, and the person will have a better idea of where they stand, so will everyone else, and the system is fair and constructive.

    Without limiting the subjectivity and not using objective prognostic indicators, it often becomes a he said/she said kind of deal, and the process lacks constructivity and anything really meaningful.
    Last edit by samadams8 on Sep 21, '12
    mariebailey likes this.
  8. 1
    Just be greatful you have a great job! I graduated in June 2011 and must have submitted over 500 applications....only thing I got was assisted living and it is HELL! So count yourself LUCKY!!!
    RN12PTL likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from RN1Each
    However, and PLEASE believe me here...NO ONE is judging your competence by how long (or short) you are on orientation. It's merely a point of pride to be able to say "yeah, I was only on for 8 weeks", but honestly, the other floor nurses might look a little more skeptically at someone who fought so hard to get off of orientation...perhaps thinking they only did it to stroke their own ego.
    Exactly. That's almost like telling people you passed NCLEX with a perfect score.


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