To any and all footcare nurse business owners - page 6

Hi there, Gosh I am so excited to be done with my footcare course that I attended in San Diego through Shelly Taylor! The course was awesome and I learned alot. Now just passing the test. I have... Read More

  1. by   NedRN
    Sorry, I still don't believe that a local practitioner would lurk on a national forum to find local competitors in a subforum with very low traffic and screen names that usually do not identify a real name. That would be the same odds as a lightning strike, not impossible, but dumb odds.

    It is much more likely that a local podiatrist with concerns about local competition investigates locally, and then Googles that practitioner to find online information, including social media. That is almost certainly what happened on those blogs you mention. Probably the blogs were personal to the person writing them and identified them clearly. I'd be interested to know why they might have been removed, but conspiracy theories about other sites are really off topic on this forum and people stop posting blog entries for all kinds of reasons.

    Bottom line is there is no reason to fear posting on this forum. If something we propose are are doing is against regulations in some jurisdiction, I think we would all learn by freely posting that here.
  2. by   sav3alif3RN
    Hi yrmajesty3, Just read this thread and it's good to know others are joining this area of Nursing. I haven't been on in a while so I can't send you a private message due to the new policy on here. I have my own business and I'm doing well. Consequently, I need to get my policies written. I would love to get more insight from you on how you went about doing it. Can you PM me and then I can reply privately?
  3. by   raenice4life
    Hello, I am a RN in NJ. I took a foot care training course at Emory University in January 2014, I would like to start my own foot care biz soon, do I have to take the exam to have my own independent business?
  4. by   yrmajesty3
    My understanding is NO, you do not have to take the test. Many practice without it. You do need to show that you have been trained though. Keep your curriculum materials to prove that you have this knowledge. I encourage you to take the exam though... it shows competency.
  5. by   raenice4life
    Ok, thank you for the reply back.
  6. by   RavinM
    This discussion is very interesting, My name is Ravin, Registered Practical Nurse from Canada. i am looking forward to start my own business as a Foot Care Nurse. please give me some suggestions and tips. i will join in advanced foot care course for nurses next month. but before i join i would like to know more about the scope for this business. i live in toronto, already poppulated with all healthcare professionals.. if anyone could guide me that will be more appreciated..
    waiting for your comments. thanks
  7. by   Charbear2200
    Are you still doing foot care in Idaho? Did the clinic ever work out? Interested in how it is going. Are you in Boise?
  8. by   litbitblack
    Marketing suggestions I would check with the DON's at the long term care facilities and let them know the service is available. We have 2 podiatrist that make facility visits in my city and you have to have a doctors order as well as consent from family d/t billing issues. Medicare now requires the PCP to see a pts feet and document the issue before the podiatrist can be consulted so I think if you get your name and your service in with the people that would know the patients that need your service you might pick up some more business. We do have some residents that families pay a private massage therapist and even a councelor that were recommended by the DON &social worker at our facility.
  9. by   mandii7
    Hello! I know this thread is years old; however, I'm interested in entering this a new career venture as a foot care nurse. I'm an RN with my MSN and certified in case management. I'm working towards a certification in foot care as well. I would like to communicate with you more about your business and how things are going.
  10. by   Gizmo21
    I am not sure how old this post is, however, after seeing this post I felt compelled to answer. I spoke to my GP with regards to foot care which I do. He gave me some very good advice which I thought I might share with you. He told me to go to all the Pharmacies and doctors and explain what you do with regards to what you offer, I for instance cut Ram's Horn Nails, corn and calluses and minor ingrown toenail removal. My doctor was really happy to hear this as he stated that although they deal with the major problems, they would prefer not to have to do the above if possible as this is really time consuming and not life threatening, and free's them up to deal with more pressing issues with patients.

    I hope that this is of some help to you.

    Kindest regards
    Carol (South Africa)
  11. by   JgCare
    I have read through the foot care nurse posts and find that few are getting positive responses from podiatrists/almost all are not. May I give you some info/suggestions?? Podiatrists who are not surgeons are very territorial about their Routine Foot Care practice - that is a hur part of their income. CONVERSELY, podiatrists who are successful podiatric SURGEONS do not want to do routine foot care - it is too expensive for them to do since they could be working in the surgical aspect of their business instead. So, my suggestion is that 1) check your state guidelines to see where you stand on how to work (in an independent office, as a concierge practice, set up with a podiatrist but independent, etc etc), then 2) design a marketing packet to take to podiatric SURGEONS, and to other physicians who might be interested in referring to you, s/as vascular surgeons (work with a lot of diabetics), primary care physicians, endocrinologists, gerontologists, etc. Brochures in hospice care units and for home care RNs to carry. The secret is getting past the front desk, of course. That is why you have the in-hand presentation ready to hand over to the office manager instead of asking to see the physician (they see it as intrusive and demanding.) If you do your leg work (DO NOT send them in the mail or call - it does not work), you will find physicians who are delighted to refer to you/you refer back to them. They HATE to trim toenails - you just need to get out there and call on the offices and clinics (wound care clinics?) to find them.
    Marketing just takes opening your mind, once you get the drift of it. It appears that I need to write some blogs on this on my site, Professional Education – "Providing excellent continuing education for nurses.". I love working with RNs etc who are not familiar with marketing and watching them become successful! This is important care in our current healthcare system! And RNs and LPNs who love to do this are performing a huge service to the chronically ill!
  12. by   JgCare
    I apologize about the double entry - I am new at this site!
    I have read through the foot care nurse posts and find that few are getting positive responses from podiatrists/almost all are not. May I give you some info/suggestions?? Podiatrists who are not surgeons are very territorial about their Routine Foot Care practice - that is a huge part of their income. CONVERSELY, podiatrists who are successful podiatric SURGEONS do not want to do routine foot care - it is too expensive for them to do since they could be working in the surgical aspect of their business instead. So, my suggestion is that 1) check your state guidelines to see where you stand on how to work (in an independent office, as a concierge practice, set up with a podiatrist but independent, etc etc), then 2) design a marketing packet to take to podiatric SURGEONS, and to other physicians who might be interested in referring to you, s/as vascular surgeons (work with a lot of diabetics), primary care physicians, endocrinologists, gerontologists, etc. Send brochures in hospice care units and for home care RNs to carry. The secret is getting past the front desk, of course. That is why you have the in-hand presentation ready to give to the office manager instead of asking to see the physician (they see it as intrusive and demanding). If you do your leg work (DO NOT send them in the mail or call - it does not work), you will find physicians who are delighted to refer to you/you refer back to them. They HATE to trim toenails - you just need to get out there and call on the offices and clinics (wound care clinics?) to find them.
    Marketing just takes opening your mind, once you get the drift of it. It appears that I need to write some blogs on this on my site, Professional Education – "Providing excellent continuing education for nurses.". I love working with RNs etc who are not familiar with marketing and watching them become successful! This is important care in our current healthcare system! And RNs and LPNs who love to do this are performing a huge service to the chronically ill!
    Last edit by JgCare on Sep 19 : Reason: double entry

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