DNP required soon? - page 2

"The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has recently released a position statement calling for the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree to be the terminal degree awarded for... Read More

  1. by   Little Fish
    Quote from Ekklesia
    Good question, as I am wondering the same thing.

    Is "Hello, I'm Doctor Smith your Nurse Anesthetist" going to fly?
    No!

    Its stupid. And any nurse that would pass themselves off as doctor is a fraud. We can receive our doctorates but that is reserved for the academic setting. Not the clinical setting. It would be misrepresenting yourself.
  2. by   deepz
    Quote from Little Fish
    No!

    Its stupid. And any nurse that would pass themselves off as doctor is a fraud. We can receive our doctorates but that is reserved for the academic setting. Not the clinical setting. It would be misrepresenting yourself.


    Are you for real?

    ??
  3. by   Biotechnology
    Quote from Little Fish
    No!

    Its stupid. And any nurse that would pass themselves off as doctor is a fraud. We can receive our doctorates but that is reserved for the academic setting. Not the clinical setting. It would be misrepresenting yourself.
    I agree with little fish. Calling yourself a doctor in the clinical setting is a sure misrepresentation to the public. There is enough confusion with patients not knowing or understanding peoples job titles in the hospital as it all ready is. No need to make it worst.:uhoh21:
  4. by   Ekklesia
    Quote from deepz
    Are you for real?

    ??


    No kidding. Especially since "little fish" answered his/her own question!


    Quote from Little Fish
    So the next logical question in my mind is, if any of you get your DNP will you call yourself doctor in the clinical setting?
    Quote from Little Fish
    No!

    Its stupid. And any nurse that would pass themselves off as doctor is a fraud. We can receive our doctorates but that is reserved for the academic setting. Not the clinical setting. It would be misrepresenting yourself.
  5. by   Little Fish
    I will add that nurses wearing white lab coats is also misrepresnting.
  6. by   deepz
    Quote from Little Fish
    I will add that nurses wearing white lab coats is also misrepresnting.

    So, what...? -- you'd have nurse go back to wearing their CAPS?!

    Antedeluvian.
  7. by   Biotechnology
    There are plenty of people in a hospital setting that where white lab coats. As a scientist I wear a white lab coat ( in the hospital). I also wore a white lab coat as a surgical technician and as a surgical assistant because it is policy in my hospital that if you go off of the OR floor you must have a lab coat on to cover your scrubs. If you do not, then you will have to change scrubs. Not everyone heeds to that though. Just food for thought.....
  8. by   Little Fish
    Quote from Biotechnology
    There are plenty of people in a hospital setting that where white lab coats. As a scientist I wear a white lab coat ( in the hospital). I also wore a white lab coat as a surgical technician and as a surgical assistant because it is policy in my hospital that if you go off of the OR floor you must have a lab coat on to cover your scrubs. If you do not, then you will have to change scrubs. Not everyone heeds to that though. Just food for thought.....
    Of course. I'm just giving some pet peeves of mine. They may be mine only but they are mine. I usually see the OR staff cover up with the gowns that are the same color as the scrubs.
  9. by   deepz
    Quote from Little Fish
    ...... I'm just giving some pet peeves of mine. They may be mine only but they are mine. ..........

    Yesterday I saw this bumper sticker:

    Earth is the Insane Asylum of the Universe

    Seems about right........

    d
  10. by   UTRN2005
    The argument of misrepresentation as a basis for lower educational requirements is asinine.

    Why would anyone be against CRNAs having higher education? CRNAs are here to administer anesthesia to the public and as such we should want the public to be as well cared for as possible. Anesthesiologists also care for the public and they either believe we can do a good job now (in which additional education is not needed and as such supervision should not be required) or they think we are not educated enough (therefore they should believe in furthering education and in the mean time be for supervision). Logically, there is not a category for pro-supervisioin and anti-education. In my opinion there is no good reason to be against higher education for anyone.

    As far as the title goes I understand the concern about not confusing patients and deceiving them to believe that I am a medical doctor. I am not. But PhDs go by the title Dr and they are not medical doctors. Pharmacists are now PharmDs and I have met some of them that go by Dr. What about chiropractors, optomotrists, physical therapists, lawyers (doctorate of jurisprudence). All of them have some form of a doctoral degree and could be correctly identified as Doctor. If you earn the degree, you earn the title.

    Perhaps our patients just need to be better educated about our profession and qualifications.
  11. by   hogan4736
    Quote from deepz
    Are you for real?

    ??
    I think most nurses would agree...

    Calling onself (as an rn) "doctor" is a complete misrepresentation, and likely just a nurse chest thumping...
  12. by   proclivity
    Quote from UTRN2005
    The argument of misrepresentation as a basis for lower educational requirements is asinine.

    Why would anyone be against CRNAs having higher education? CRNAs are here to administer anesthesia to the public and as such we should want the public to be as well cared for as possible. Anesthesiologists also care for the public and they either believe we can do a good job now (in which additional education is not needed and as such supervision should not be required) or they think we are not educated enough (therefore they should believe in furthering education and in the mean time be for supervision). Logically, there is not a category for pro-supervisioin and anti-education. In my opinion there is no good reason to be against higher education for anyone.

    As far as the title goes I understand the concern about not confusing patients and deceiving them to believe that I am a medical doctor. I am not. But PhDs go by the title Dr and they are not medical doctors. Pharmacists are now PharmDs and I have met some of them that go by Dr. What about chiropractors, optomotrists, physical therapists, lawyers (doctorate of jurisprudence). All of them have some form of a doctoral degree and could be correctly identified as Doctor. If you earn the degree, you earn the title.

    Perhaps our patients just need to be better educated about our profession and qualifications.
    most people with their PhDs do, in fact, go by doctor but they certainly don't do so in a hospital setting. A person with a PhD in organic chemistry would not introduce themselves as Dr. So-and-so for obvious reasons.

    I do understand that organic chemistry degrees are rarely seen in the medical setting attached to people that have less than an MD degree, or PhDs for that matter. (I am not saying that they don't exist or that people who do not have an MD are not smart enough to get a PhD......so get all of that rebuttal crap out of your system before responding).

    There is a distinct problem with introducing oneself as Dr. SO-and-so when in fact they are not a medical doctor. We can all see the reasons for that.....avoid confusion of the patient and prevent the representation of yourself as a physician.

    The other side is.....what is the point of getting a PhD if you can't say doctor? The point is to improve patient care and be the best anesthetist you can. We should police ourselves if we do want to say the Dr. title by adding the fact that you have an advanced nursing degree, the DNP, and you are a CRNA administering the anesthesia.

    Since i am a nurse, i know all of the stuff that is going on with someone just by reading their badge, however, not everyone is as well versed in the health care hierarchy as we are....we owe it to all of our patients to prevent misrepresentation and discern between a DNP and an MD with every single introduction....if one chooses to use the Dr. title.

    JMHO
  13. by   Biotechnology
    Quote from UTRN2005
    The argument of misrepresentation as a basis for lower educational requirements is asinine.

    Why would anyone be against CRNAs having higher education? CRNAs are here to administer anesthesia to the public and as such we should want the public to be as well cared for as possible. Anesthesiologists also care for the public and they either believe we can do a good job now (in which additional education is not needed and as such supervision should not be required) or they think we are not educated enough (therefore they should believe in furthering education and in the mean time be for supervision). Logically, there is not a category for pro-supervisioin and anti-education. In my opinion there is no good reason to be against higher education for anyone.

    As far as the title goes I understand the concern about not confusing patients and deceiving them to believe that I am a medical doctor. I am not. But PhDs go by the title Dr and they are not medical doctors. Pharmacists are now PharmDs and I have met some of them that go by Dr. What about chiropractors, optomotrists, physical therapists, lawyers (doctorate of jurisprudence). All of them have some form of a doctoral degree and could be correctly identified as Doctor. If you earn the degree, you earn the title.

    Perhaps our patients just need to be better educated about our profession and qualifications.
    Some of these that you have mentioned do not call themselves Doctor in a hospital setting. For example, the professor that has a docotorate in English does not walk into the hospital and call himself/herself doctor "So -n- So". I agree that patients need to be better educated... but somehow I dont see that coming fast enough. In the meantime, there has to be a distingiushing factor of Who's Who in the medical field. Oh, By the way, I have a friend that is a Doctor of Epidemiology and people are constantly asking her medical questions because they are confused about what type of doctor she is....She hates explaining so she just hand them her card and tells people to call her by her first name.. but around her collegues she is Doctor....

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