Differentiating IV Dialysis Catheters

  1. 0
    I'm looking for articles and/or photos of different types of dialysis catheters.
    How does one tell what type of catheter it is, if not told, or are they documented simply as dual lumen dialysis catheter, etc.? Thanks in advance.
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  5. 0
    The only dialysis catheters we use at my facility are Shileys. Maybe you could do a web search on those?
  6. 0
    Hi,
    There are several types of caths. The name is usually on the cath. unless it is old and the name has faded away. Some are temporary and others are permanent tunnelled caths.

    Kaffenoir
  7. 0
    Quote from Gldngrl
    I'm looking for articles and/or photos of different types of dialysis catheters.
    How does one tell what type of catheter it is, if not told, or are they documented simply as dual lumen dialysis catheter, etc.? Thanks in advance.
    There are numerous different brand names of dilaysis catheters... just different manufacturers.

    Most, if not all, will have the name stamped on them somewhere.. such as "ashsplit", etc. along with the cc amount each lumen holds, such as the arterial would be stamped 2.4cc, the venous 2.5 cc.
    Last edit by jnette on Nov 10, '07
  8. 0
    I need to look more closely then at the catheter lumen; it's easy to see the cc labeling on the clamps, but I haven't noted the catheter name and I've been identifying it as ie: "right subclavian dual lumen dialysis catheter" etc as part of my assessment...I can't really on others to tell me its identification because I'll get two different answers Thanks for your responses.
  9. 1
    Are you a dialysis nurse? Frankly, there's not much difference between catheters, unless you have to work with them directly, i.e. doing dialysis. Some nurses and vascular surgeons prefer one brand over another, for various reasons, but in terms of assessing the site you don't really need to know the brand any more than you need to know the name brand of an IV catheter. Now, you should know the difference between and IJ and a SC placement, or, in some cases, a femoral.
    Hellllllo Nurse likes this.
  10. 0
    Quote from mwcia12
    Are you a dialysis nurse? Frankly, there's not much difference between catheters, unless you have to work with them directly, i.e. doing dialysis. Some nurses and vascular surgeons prefer one brand over another, for various reasons, but in terms of assessing the site you don't really need to know the brand any more than you need to know the name brand of an IV catheter. Now, you should know the difference between and IJ and a SC placement, or, in some cases, a femoral.
    Ditto ! There's no need to know the brand of the cath... and the type (SC, IJ, etc.) is already printed on our flowsheets, so we have no need to add anything to it.
  11. 0
    No, I'm not a dialysis nurse, but our pt population presents w/ these catheters freq and we're allowed to access them for IVF/meds/labs if no other access available. I want to chart accurately, if for no other reason, but when in doubt I believe that describing location, #lumens, and the fact pt has a dialysis catheter w/ dressing dated, etc. will suffice. Thanks again.
  12. 1
    Quote from Gldngrl
    No, I'm not a dialysis nurse, but our pt population presents w/ these catheters freq and we're allowed to access them for IVF/meds/labs if no other access available. I want to chart accurately, if for no other reason, but when in doubt I believe that describing location, #lumens, and the fact pt has a dialysis catheter w/ dressing dated, etc. will suffice. Thanks again.
    You do know that these caths are blocked with heparin blocks ? Either 5 or 10 thousand units... and that these must be removed before pushing anything, or flushing, or even drawing labs....?

    I've never heard of using these caths for anything but dialysis... waaaaaaaaay too much potential to invite infection. This practice is very much discouraged. The more these caths are messed with, the more potential for problems with them, be it occlusions, infection, or other. Kinda scary to me.
    dayshiftnurse likes this.
  13. 2
    Quote from jnette
    You do know that these caths are blocked with heparin blocks ? Either 5 or 10 thousand units... and that these must be removed before pushing anything, or flushing, or even drawing labs....?

    I've never heard of using these caths for anything but dialysis... waaaaaaaaay too much potential to invite infection. This practice is very much discouraged. The more these caths are messed with, the more potential for problems with them, be it occlusions, infection, or other. Kinda scary to me.
    Yes, I know the catheters are blocked w/ heparin, we have a very specific policy and we're one of three units in the hosp that can access the dialysis caths. I don't like to and believe me, we try to obtain any other access we can and we are a teaching facility, but if no access is to be found...you may find it interesting to know that some of our patients that have dialysis caths that undergo transplants come back with no additional access, other than that and we're expected to run everything (Nipride, Esmolol, Fenoldopam, MIV, Replacement IV, PCA, etc) thru it. Not an ideal situation at all. I follow the access/deaccess policy to the letter and maintain sterile technique and I personally have more of a problem w/ the stories I hear about unlicensed personnel's ability to access these catheters for HD.


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