three days of precepting left! eeeek! but YAY! (advice needed)

  1. So I am almost on my own after six weeks of full time training. This is my first ICU Job. I worked in a PCU for a year and a half before this transition. The last 5 months in the PCU were in this same facility which I didn't love, management needs some help so I accepted the transfer to the ICU when they approached me. (They were short night nurses in the ICU but I let them treat it like they wanted ME there LOL)

    Anyway. I am so excited to be on my own, having a preceptor has been amazing but good lord she needs to learn how to be bored - she gets bored and comes over to me and totally interrupts my flow, I totally get it, she has to make sure I am being safe and not about to kill a patient. I would probably be the same way. But I am so excited to be able to go about my day without someone coming up to me right after I do something to make sure I did it - i.e. she will come up and ask if I have enough Levo- I always make sure I have enough- including the extra bag of pressors on the pole (as allowed in our policy) No running out on my watch! Just things like that that are totally important. However I am not a 'new' new nurse, granted 1 and a half years in a PCU isn't a ton of experience but it is enough for her to back up a little so I can figure out when I need help.

    I start my last week of training tomorrow. I am really hoping she will let me do my thing with very little intervention- maybe just be a resource so I can ensure her and myself that in just four shifts I will be fine with no preceptor. Any tips on how to get her to back up some next week without hurting her feelings- again, I completely see where she is coming from but I am on my own as of Sunday- three 12's with her and I am alone. ((eek))

    Thanks in advance!
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  2. 2 Comments

  3. by   Ruby Vee
    Since your preceptor is the one actually responsible for your patients, I don't see any way to get her to "back off." After six weeks of precepting, you may know nearly enough to be out on your own, but I'm hoping that you realize you'll still need mentoring. You don't have the skills and the knowledge yet to take care of every patient in every situation. That comes with time. Even with your 18 months of experience, you are still a novice in the ICU.

    Take the mentorship with good grace. And make sure you aren't so overconfident that you make mistakes.
  4. by   WestCoastSunRN
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Since your preceptor is the one actually responsible for your patients, I don't see any way to get her to "back off." After six weeks of precepting, you may know nearly enough to be out on your own, but I'm hoping that you realize you'll still need mentoring. You don't have the skills and the knowledge yet to take care of every patient in every situation. That comes with time. Even with your 18 months of experience, you are still a novice in the ICU.

    Take the mentorship with good grace. And make sure you aren't so overconfident that you make mistakes.
    This. Perfectly said. I will add -- I understand what the OP is feeling and sometimes preceptors will be amenable to becoming more the "silent partner" towards the end in order to give the new nurse the feeling of truly being on his/her own -- but they are absolutely in the know about everything going on, they are just savvy about following behind the orientee. You could ask her about this -- but make sure you frame it from a place of humility not because you think you don't need her. You need her. Trust me. BUT.... ICU is a team sport -- you will/should never be alone.

    Good luck to you on your new job!

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