Can a nurse be part of the Special Operations and Response Team (SORT)? - page 2

by Cowboy Thug 6,845 Views | 16 Comments

Hello, I was wondering if anyone had an information on the SORT team in the BOP. I wanted to know if it was possible for te SORT team to have a nurse on board. The Special Operations and Response Team (SORT) are, from what I have... Read More


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    Clearly, the role of a nurse does not include "activities such as SORT, pat downs, area searches, forced cell moves, etc. etc. etc." .. this is clear whether it has been established as an official policy and/or standard or not.

    The moral and ethical quandary of "serving two masters" within the correctional environment -- an environment in which patient advocacy is most crucial, often lacking and necessarily overiding -- would be severe, to say the least. To pepper spray an inmate one minute (in one's security role) only to then ask the patient the next minute "what's wrong with your eyes?" (in one's nursing role) is obviously counterintuitive, to say the least.

    I believe this one is quite obvious. The nursing cuffs are for blood pressure, the correctional officers' cuffs are to protect society.

    The mere fact that this may not be settled understanding, practice or debate really is the hot topic here to consider. How is that this is actually considered valid for consideration? How is that it is even possibly, remotely, considered okay? wow...

    Logistically, how would something like that really work? Let's say a nurse participates in a cell extraction. Ok, so the nmate is subdued, bruised, tased, sprayed and hog-tied....ok,... um.... its time for the nurse...where is she?? "Nurse!... nurse... we need you."... shouts the team leader.

    The nurse team member then releases the inmate's left leg long enough to quickly pull off her black face guard, padded vest and hand her chemical cannister to her closest teamate. She then would quickly and discretely pull her baby blue scrubs over her head (you know.. the one with the panda bears on it) then tilt her head back slightly and tighten her lips in an effort to respond from the corner of her mouth: "Okay,... be right there!"

    I will say this, however, it would go a long way to help in the assessment process. After all, the injuries would be well known at that point as they would have been inflicted by the "healer."

    sorry, I guess I just don't understand.
    betty boop23 likes this.
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    To the best of my knowledge and what I've read, please correct me if I'm wrong, but the FBI uses EMT's and nurses in their SWAT for the benefit of both hostages and team members. I understand how conflicting both roles may be and I value all your opinions, I just wanted to be as useful as possible. I do not want or desire to "subdue, bruise, tase, spray and hog-tie", I simply wanted to help our staff. But yes, it is conflicting. No need to be sarcastic, but thank you for your input.
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    I think in the case of a SWAT team, there is not so much of a conflict. The medical staff are not part of the team, but rather an auxiliary. In addition, they have an ongoing relationship with the team but not the criminals they interact with. Thus, the potential for conflict is reduced.

    Just my first pass thoughts on it.
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    Quote from BSNinTX
    I think in the case of a SWAT team, there is not so much of a conflict. The medical staff are not part of the team, but rather an auxiliary. In addition, they have an ongoing relationship with the team but not the criminals they interact with. Thus, the potential for conflict is reduced.

    Just my first pass thoughts on it.
    Exactly. The healing role is different than the custody role. Someone inside the facility has to treat the inmates' medical conditions from a perspective of advocacy, albeit, limited and narrowly constructed. Someone inside has to view them as humans in need of care, when care is needed. If the nurse is knocking heads and subduing people, then the people with the smashed faces (the inmates) are going to be a bit hard pressed to view the guy/gal as a "healer."

    I'm sorry if I sound (read) a bit sarcastic on this point. I guess I just sort of took this as a given -- something that didn't need to be pointed out, so to speak. I do get frustrated with this stuff sometimes.
    Phyxius likes this.
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    I belong to our SORT team in a metropolitan city in the southern US. I am the medic for the team. I am a LPN & EMT-IV & gradually acquiring my training @ each of our monthly training days. Last training day, we did a 15+ mile wilderness hike along with open water survival training @ one of our local lakes. I have only been with out SORT team for 6 months & to date, do not forsee the department allowing a nurse/EMT to train with firearms in the near future.
    Last edit by ninjanurseemt on Jul 27, '11 : Reason: misspelled word
    lindarn likes this.
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    Thank you all for your input. I have been told I am an adrenaline junkie so I am always trying to find a thrilling avenue to my job. I accept it is a conflicting position to be in and now understand why the nurse is not directly involved. I guess I'll go into a trauma ER and use firearms (SAFELY) on my own time outside of work. Thanks again.
  7. 0
    perhaps having the medical team on stand by versus in full ERT gear would show both officers and inmates that "Medical" is standing by.


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